THE REMAKE REBELLION CONTINUES! (BAAGHI 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Vishal-Shekhar, Rochak Kohli, Pranaay Rijia, Sachet-Parampara, Bappi Lahiri & René Bendali
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Tanishk Bagchi, Panchhi Jalonvi, Ginny Diwan, Gurpreet Saini, Gautam G. Sharma & René Bendali
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th March 2020
♪ Movie Released On: 6th March 2020

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Baaghi 3 Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 3 is an Bollywood action film starring Tiger Shroff, Shraddha Kapoor, and Riteish DeshmukhThe film is directed by Ahmed Khan and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. Introduction to this film franchise is futile, everyone knows about it and everyone also knows how it is just stretching itself longer than it can hold. Ah, well, going by the reviews, I can see a ‘Baaghi 4’ has bleak prospects, but that is all the more reason for the filmmaker to actually make a ‘Baaghi 4’. Anyway, the film franchise boasted of an all-original album for the first film, followed by a bearable album for the sequel. Here comes the second sequel in the franchise, and in this age of remakes and recreations, I’m not surprised that the first four songs of ‘Baaghi 3’ are remakes! Hoots and cheers for the remake artist Tanishk Bagchi for handling two of these remakes, while Vishal-Shekhar successfully claimed rights to their song ‘Dus Bahane’ and remade it themselves, and Pranaay comes back to recreate his theme song that features in all ‘Baaghi’ films till now. As such, one awaits the original compositions by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli. Let’s see just how well this remake rebellion fares.


Vishal-Shekhar risk entering a multicomposer album in order to salvage their 2005 hit ‘Dus Bahane’ (Dus) which is the opening song for ‘Baaghi 3’. Dus Bahane 2.0 definitely lacks the punch that the original had, and just increasing the tempo of the original track makes the song sound a bit weird, making K.K. and Shaan’s voices sound highly processed. Tulsi Kumar’s portions are awkwardly low in pitch, and composed really uncreatively. That kind of makes me think if Vishal-Shekhar really did contribute any new melody to the remake or just asked Meghdeep Bose to create a ‘Vishal-Shekhar Mix’ or something, of the Tanishk Version. That being said, the beats are well placed, and the song works as a crowd-pleaser, since this is clearly what pleases the crowd these days.

Moving on to Tanishk’s actual remakes, he picks up yet another Bappi Lahiri classic after ‘Yaar Bina Chain Kahan Re’ was remade in ‘Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan’. This time ‘Ek Aankh Maarun’ (Tohfa) gets chosen to be recreated. The song’s catchphrase Bhankas becomes the title of the remake, and all that I notice in the first listen is the good choice of singers — Dev Negi and Jonita Gandhi. They bring the fun of the song to the forefront, and while Bagchi’s beats are just a modern mix of South kuthu beats with that 80s dhakkachika rhythm, the beats kind of work to the song’s favour. Songs like this do not really need their lyrics to be talked about, so I will do just that and go on to Tanishk’s next remake in the album, this time that of a foreign song, Do You Love Me by René Bendali. The song has already been remade by an English pop artist TroyBoi, and now T-Series picks it up for a Hindi reinterpretation. The Arabian setup isn’t new to Bollywood; we have had many original Hindi songs better than this, with the same musical setting. The new compositions with Hindi lyrics barely fit into the hook, but the creativity in the programming and beats makes it worth a listen. Nikhita gets not much space to shine, with very simplistic lines to sing, and before you know it, the song is thankfully over. Also, the Hindi lyricist for the new lyrics hasn’t been mentioned, so I’m guessing it is Tanishk.

Moving over to the franchise theme song by Pranaay, Get Ready to Fight Reloaded, which is probably the most ignored song from every ‘Baaghi’ album, but the makers still seem to be revamping it in hopes that it will get noticed by the audience this time around. The first time, it released as a single after the entire album released, so it went under the radar, while in the second album, it was very badly promoted. And this time, I finally do feel like it will get noticed. First of all, Pranaay packs it with a punch, and some interesting elements like EDM, electronic tablas, whistles, and a groovy beat coupled with Siddharth Basrur’s powerful vocals. The song doesn’t try too hard to be a ‘theme’, as in it doesn’t try too hard to do too much just to stick in the audience’s head, like the previous two versions of it, did. There is also a melodious antara to the song, and Ginny Diwan’s lyrics too make the song worthy of your attention. So this year, we saw the third version of ‘Bezubaan’ in ‘Street Dancer’ failing, but we get to see the third version of ‘Get Ready to Fight’, succeed in the same year. 🙂

Lastly, the two original, melodious songs of the album, one each by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli, two of the music composers that really impressed me with their original music last year. Sachet-Parampara follow their usual ‘Khwabfaroshi’ (Jabariya Jodi) and ‘Dilbara’ (Pati Patni Aur Woh) template in Faaslon Mein, a melancholic Bhatt-ish song that makes you wonder why nobody has taken them to Vishesh Films’ office yet. The piano, intense never-ending lines of singing, followed by a line of singing without any music in the background, and Parampara joining as background vocalist halfway through, the song contains all the standard elements of a Sachet-Parampara song, and that is scary — it means they have been typecast so soon into their career. The song ends with a brilliant strings piece accompanied by a chorus, and even though the composition seems underwhelming, at least Sourav Roy with his arrangements and Sachet with his vocals, have done a good job.

Rochak Kohli brings on board Shaan for his song Tujhe Rab Mana, getting him his second song in the album, if ‘Dus Bahane’ can be counted since it didn’t make him re-dub anything new. The song is a melodious ode to brotherhood, sort of like Rochak’s friendship anthems ‘Atrangi Yaari’ (Wazir) and ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety). However, the song is musically set in a different space, intermediate to both of those aforementioned songs. Not as lively as the former, but not as melancholic as the latter, it finds its niche somewhere in the middle. The composition is sweet and uses the phrase “Tere jaisa yaar kahaan” in its lyrics, so that is enough to strike the brotherly string in Indians. 😂 Shaan delivers the piece with finesse, and Rochak aptly arranges strings, guitars and piano pieces to accompany the composition. However, I wouldn’t voluntarily go and listen to this song, it being around 5 minutes long.


As expected, ‘Baaghi 3’ relies on its remakes to propel it forward. And when the remakes actually do seem to be made and promoted with more efforts than the original tracks, it says a lot. Rochak and Sachet-Parampara’s songs are good but just that. The only great song was the ‘Get Ready to Fight’ remake by Pranaay. An album where not even one song is memorable.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 5 + 7.5 + 6 + 6.5 = 36.5

Album Percentage: 60.83%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Get Ready To Fight Reloaded > Tujhe Rab Mana > Faaslon Mein = Bhankas > Dus Bahane 2.0 > Do You Love Me

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A TRIPLE-DEBUT TREAT TOILET!! (TOILET: EK PREM KATHA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar & Sachet-Parampara
♪ Lyrics by: Siddharth-Garima
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

Toilet – Ek Prem Katha Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an upcoming Bollywood satire, starring Alshay Kumar, Bhumi Pednekar, Divyendu Sharma and Anupam Kher,  directed by Shree Narayan Singh, and produced by Aruna Bhatia, Shital Bhatia, Abundantia, Viacom Motion Pictures, Arjun N. Kapoor and Hitesh Thakkar. The film comes in support of PM Modi’s ‘Swacchh Bharat Abhiyaan’ by raising fingers at the issue of open defecation, prevalent in remote and underdeveloped parts of the country. Now it is a really good topic, but somehow, by the trailer and promos, I am not sure whether it will be carried out in a humorous way without looking dramatic. Anyway, the music, very surprisingly, has been scored by three debutant music composers, two duos and one individual. Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar and Sachet-Parampara are the five lucky people who got to debut in Bollywood with an Akshay Kumar album, and how wonderful an opportunity is that!! I hope they make great use of it though, and provide us with a nice and clean ‘Toilet’! {Sorry for the desperate joke!}


1. Hans Mat Pagli

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

The first newcomer starts off the album with a cute romantic song which sends off a great rural-setting vibe. The song’s composition is nothing innovative as such, but it still manages to hook the listeners, since it is so cute and such a throwback to Bollywood of the 90s. The only grouse I have with the composition is that the hookline sounds a lot like the antara of ‘Pardesi Pardesi’ (Raja Hindustani), which would be where the 90s vibes are coming from. The song is structured quite oddly, with a male mukhda, a male antara, and then a female mukhda followed by a female antara. Why couldn’t they just club the mukhdas together and the antaras together? That way, the listener would get some variation from male to female and then back to a male voice. Anyway, as they wish. The composition for all these stanzas is very cute again. The recording seems a bit faulty and raw, but that’s probably deliberate? The arrangements are again, not anything new or innovative, but that soft Qawwali setting to the hookline gives a soothing feeling, and the dholaks have been played beautifully, as are the plucked string instruments throughout the song, and the guitar itself. There is a wonderful rapid tabla piece before Sonu sings his antara. The rhythm is heard before, but the cuteness of the composition helps you listen to such a rhythm yet again without complaining. The vocals send you back to 2005-2007, when Sonu-Shreya duets were the thing. Every director wanted a Sonu-Shreya duet in their film; sadly, nowadays, that happens only in films where the director knows only about the old singers, and hence his music ends up sounding outdated. But here, there is no datedness whatsoever. It is more like a nostalgia. Both singers do an amazing job, though I somewhere thought that Shreya was struggling with such a high-pitched line in the antara. Siddharth-Garima choose the perfect line for the hookline; it increases the cuteness quotient of the song. The rest of the lyrics are cute too, but not too innovative. A good song to start the album with, but it has its own faults.
Rating: 4/5

 

2. Bakheda

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

Vickey has the second song to his credit as well, making him the main composer on this album. This song takes a more lively route, but stays a romantic song. As soon as it starts, the folksy vibe hits you, and you are also relieved that Vickey has used a more modern recording style for this one; it proves that the recording was deliberately done that way for the previous song. The composition is a lively one, but the hookline is really a letdown — it is so staid and bland. Also, we have heard such a hook so many times where the mukhda builds up to it, and then after a pause, the hookline takes the song forward. The antaras are very well composed. Sukhwinder, at his usual energetic self, renders the song with ease, and creates a good impact on the listeners. The problem lies in Sunidhi’s vocals, which seem less energetic as usual. It really sounds like she wasn’t interested, or maybe the pitch was too low. That makes her portion sound very odd, despite the beautiful composition of the antara. The arrangements are lively folksy arrangements with the percussion leading, and a nice plucked instrument entertaining throughout. A sarangi can also be made out occasionally. The percussion is the star of the song though. Siddharth-Garima, again, write an effective song to go with the film, but the impact of the lyrics doesn’t reach the audience out of the film. A functional song, but won’t really stay with you for long.
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Gori Tu Latth Maar

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Palak Muchhal, Backing Vocals ~ Umesh Joshi, Vijay Dhuri, Swapnil Godbole, Karan Kagale & Rishikesh Patel, Music by ~ Manas-Shikhar

The Rahman vibe hits you as soon as this one starts with the beautiful chimey music at the beginning. Manas-Shikhar, another debutant duo, enter the album with this song, and with only one song to prove their worth, they seize the opportunity and let me tell you, they make the best use of it, better than both of the other composer teams on this album! They employ a very lively setting to a supposed-to-be sad song. It is the festival of Holi, but of course, Bhumi Pednekar’s character is mad at Akshay’s character, because of we know what! So this is a situational song, in which Akshay pleads to her for forgiving him. Against the backdrop of a Holi song, a very emotional song, and I’ve heard something like this for the first time. Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics reveal all the emotion in the best way possible. Now let’s go back to Manas-Shikhar’s music. Their composition is just so catchy, especially the mukhda, which should be catchy in order to hook the listeners right away. It sounds like something straight out of a Rahman song. The hookline also succeeds in being a very beautiful, and catchy line. The antara is the female part of the song, and it has a very beautiful tune as well, which will remind you of the 90s songs, that used to slow down in the middle for the female parts. There’s a nice tempo-rise towards the end, in which we hear the already popular “Radhe Radhe” chorus. Sonu Nigam renders the tune with such brilliance, knowing when to emote which emotion, and wonderful aalaaps. Palak too, sings beautifully, and the brilliant composition of her portion helps her do that wonderfully. The arrangements are ever fluctuating, with the emotional and soft sound from the mukhda alternating with the usual Holi sound of the dholaks and other percussions. The shehnaai is played in a very beautiful tune. Those bells at the beginning are the most beautiful though. A wholesome song that defines what Bollywood is all about — colour, festivity, emotion and dance! Oh, and congratulations to Manas-Shikhar for a smashing debut!
Rating: 5/5

 

4. Subha Ki Train

Singers ~ Sachet Tandon & Parampara Thakur, Backing Vocals ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rituraj Mohanty, Music by ~ Sachet-Parampara

The last of the debutants bring up the finale of the album, which happens to be yet another cute romantic song. This one is a little less folksy than the others, but it does have the effect that it should. Sachet Tandon and Parampara Thakur have composed a lilting melody, that, though situational, and very predictable, still makes you smile and feel good. The prelude gave off some vibes of “Tere Sang Yaara” (Rustom). The mukhda is very sweet and simple, and instantly grabs your attention. The letdown here is the hook, which is as staid and heard-before as imaginable. But the antara is mind-blowing; especially the second line of it. The arrangements too, follow a very simple template, with that cute Duff rhythm, and in a wonderful second interlude, the flutes assortment and strings orchestra just mystifies. The first interlude with the mouth organ is splendid too. Sachet and Parampara handle the vocals themselves, and strangely enough, employ Rituraj Mohanty and Sukriti Kakar as backing vocalists for the aalaaps. Parampara’s is a voice to look out for, while Sachet’s voice just blends in with the multitude of new male voices we have in Bollywood, other than Arijit. 😅 Again, Siddharth-Garima stick to situational yet catchy lyrics; the hook lyrics made me smile. A good finale, and a promising debut, but not a song that will stay in my head for more than a month.
Rating: 3.5/5


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an album just like Akshay Kumar movie albums usually are — fun, vibrant and groovy, but with an overbearing romantic theme. What makes it even more special is that all the composers are debutants and it is commendable of the makers to have accepted the three for a film which will reach so many people! Seizing the opportunity, all three newcomers do a good job, and especially Manas-Shikhar do an amazing one. The album is a triple-debut treat!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 77.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Gori Tu Latth Maar > Hans Mat Pagli > Subha Ki Train > Bakheda

 

Which is your favourite song from Toilet – Ek Prem Katha? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂