SACHIN-JIGAR DEFINITELY PASS! (SHAKUNTALA DEVI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu & Priya Saraiya
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st July 2020
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st July 2020

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Shakuntala Devi Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Shakuntala Devi is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Vidya Balan in the titular role while Sanya Malhotra, Amit Sadh and Jisshu Sengupta play other important roles. The film is about the Indian writer and “human computer”, Shakuntala Devi, and is directed by Anu Menon. The trailer of the movie showed that it has been given quite a quirky treatment, and one expected a lot of fun and frolic to ensure in its songs and in the film itself. To that intent, Sachin-Jigar, widely known in Bollywood for their quirky music (their association with Maddock Films is proof enough), have been roped in for the music, while their regulars Vayu and Priya Saraiya take care of the lyrics department. A bunch of talented seasoned singers like Sunidhi Chauhan, Shreya Ghoshal, Benny Dayal and Monali Thakur, feature on the singers list for the album, and that makes me all the more excited! 🙂


The guitars that kick off Pass Nahi Toh Fail Nahi get you grooving right away, and the layering of a thumping drum beat to that just increases the likability until songstress Sunidhi Chauhan joins in. The two-and-a-half minute song progresses with not a very reliable composition, except for the hook line, and frankly, it seems more than enough for a song like this. Reminiscent of other Bollywood songs set in the school classroom a la ‘Bum Bum Bole’ (Taare Zameen Par), ‘Maths Mein Dabba Gul’ (Nil Battey Sannata) and ‘Madamji Go Easy’ (Hichki), the song relies on its quirky lyrics by Vayu that appeal to little ones. The underlying motivational message is a nice inclusion, and the children’s chorus does a nice job backing Sunidhi up. That said, it is a song that is completely dependent on its hookline.

Sunidhi, who seems to be the singing voice of Vidya Balan in the film, returns for the second song Rani Hindustani, an O.P. Nayyar-esque take on Shakuntala Devi’s days in London. Sunidhi’s fun-filled rendition immediately reminds you of ‘Bloody Hell’, the song she sung for Vishal Bhardwaj’s ‘Rangoon’, especially the way she rolls her “r” in the word “Angrrrezi“. One could imagine it being delivered to a tee by the legendary Geeta Dutt, if this song were made in those times. Sachin-Jigar put up an amazing retro-themed arrangement for the song, complete with accordion, guitars and an energetic rhythm. Again, Vayu adds an endearing patriotic streak (“Duniya ki rani Hindustani!”) in his lyrics, which, if you aren’t looking for it, seems like just another upbeat song. The lack of an antara upsets me, however, because the creators decide to end the delightful song at a miserly 2 minutes and 24 seconds!

Continuing with the retro streak, Jhilmil Piya is a sultry romantic number, set to a tempting rhythm in which Sachin-Jigar put the Spanish guitars, piano and percussion instruments (cajon+güiro?) to wonderful use. The song does intermittently resort again to the brassy upbeat-ness that defined the previous song ‘Rani Hindustani’, but always manages to slow down again after that momentary interruption. Monali Thakur, who we are listening to after a long time, steals the show in the song, while Benny Dayal seems like a slightly less energetic version of himself, as though deliberately modifying his vocals to sound huskier. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are fun, and Sachin-Jigar fit them into the meter quite creatively, especially in the hook portions. This is the pick of the album for me.

The last of the lot is Shreya Ghoshal’s Paheli, where we return to the standard Sachin-Jigar guitar and piano-led melody a la ‘Khushamdeed’ (Go Goa Gone) and ‘Afeemi’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu). The composition is adorable, complete with the quintessential Bollywood lullaby vocals “Taa raa ree raa raa roo”, but the song is in essence a song from daughter to mother, probably going to be picturised on Sanya Malhotra and Vidya Balan. I couldn’t help but wonder whether Shreya’s voice doesn’t sound like it usually does, but she carries the song through capably. Priya’s lyrics depict the daughter-mother relationship beautifully and peculiarly say “Maa bann jaa na tu meri” (Become my mom!) Well, only the film can answer that query for us!


Sachin-Jigar provide an aptly upbeat album to celebrate the human computer’s life, and Vidya Balan bringing these songs to life will be a pleasure to watch! With half of the album sticking to the retro theme and the other half being more situational than theme-based, the songs have the potential to make the film an enjoyable watch. Close on the heels of the could-be-better ‘Angrezi Medium’ soundtrack, Sachin-Jigar are back in their element. Sachin-Jigar need not worry about failing because they have definitely passed!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 7.5 + 8 + 6.5 = 29

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jhilmil Piya > Rani Hindustani > Pass Nahi Toh Fail Nahi > Paheli

Which is your favourite song from Shankuntala Devi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CRAZY LABEL VS DECENT COMPOSER DUO! (ARJUN PATIALA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa & Akash D
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Priya Saraiya, Benny Dayal & Akash D
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 26th July 2019

 

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Arjun Patiala is a Bollywood spoof comedy film starring Diljit Dosanjh, Kriti Sanon and Varun Sharma in lead roles. The film is direccted by Rohit Jugraj and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Sandeep Leyzell, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s first poster credited Sachin-Jigar for its music, but that culminated in the album jukebox crediting Guru Randhawa and Akash D alongside the duo. How they ended up there and for what, let’s see!


It’s not as much surprising as it is sneaky of the music label to add Guru Randhawa as a co-composer, along with the already capable Sachin-Jigar, in two songs out of their four. Starting with that note, we get a very dull sad song, Dil Todeya, the name of which is quite representative of my feelings after learning that there’s another person along with Sachin-Jigar composing some songs of the film. The song is the standard-issue Punjabi pop song, and surprisingly the only song sung by leading man Diljit Dosanjh, though the rest of the soundtrack does leave plenty scope for him to have sung! Nothing in the composition or arrangements shows that the song involves Sachin-Jigar in any way, but ironically the arrangements are solely by Sachin-Jigar, so maybe they are deliberately this typical, given that the movie is a spoof after all. The only interesting element in the song perhaps is the Qamancha/Kamancheh, an Armenian bowed string instrument related to the violin, performed here by Rasalila, and it sounds wonderful. The lyrics by Randhawa again are standard Punjabi pop sad song lyrics. Diljit renders the song with the required sorrow, but it’s nothing compared to his previous songs in ‘Udta Punjab’, ‘Phillauri’, ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ and ‘Soorma’. Coincidentally, Sachin-Jigar were the first Bollywood composers to use his voice, back when he didn’t act in Bollywood, in ‘Pee Pa Pee Pa Ho Gaya’ (Tere Naal Love Ho Gaya) way back in 2012! Ah well, something has to be sacrificed at the altar of including Guru Randhawa as co-composer. Another coincidence (?) was that Guru’s debut or big break in Bollywood was in an album for which Sachin-Jigar did the original songs — ‘Hindi Medium’, which leads to the third coincidence — this film too was a Maddock+T-Series joint production! Want another coincidence? Sachin-Jigar were the first composers to use Randhawa in a film song, as a singer for a song he didn’t compose, ‘Lagdi Hai Thaai’ (Simran)! Phew!
The second song that the duo composes along with Randhawa though, fares much better, and this time, I contradictorily feel like the song sounds nothing like Guru Randhawa in terms of composition or arrangements! Also, when T-Series released the song, titled Main Deewana Tera as the opening promotional song for the film, they didn’t mention Guru as a composer. Some shady business going on in the crediting of this album. Anyway, Sachin-Jigar (and Guru Randhawa, apparently) create a funky party song (marketed as ‘Ek aur Remix gaana’ with the word ‘remix’ slashed out and replaced with the word ‘Original’) which throws you back to the duo’s own ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), what with the whole R.D. Burman sound (the second soundtrack in a row which harks back to Burman’s music, without remixing it!) It also sounds like Pritam’s ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani) owing largely to the wonderful trumpet solos (Kishore Sodha). Guru Randhawa sounds thankfully well in this one, and along with Sachin-Jigar, he manages to concoct a catchy composition, writes functional but stale lyrics and to top it all, Nikhita Gandhi ends the song with her stray line.
Sachin-Jigar’s third song is one that sounds entirely like something Guru would compose, but to my surprise (or no surprise at this point, since we’ve seen two songs composed by both of them together, both of which sound nothing like a collaboration between the two) Guru Randhawa isn’t a composer for this one! Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda ends up being catchy in parts only, Sachin-Jigar totally imitating Guru’s musical style in the beats, with a very heavy bass line in the hookline, which, by the way, has been composed very catchily. The other great attraction in this song is Benny Dayal’s Arabic interlude (which he has also written, apparently!) The song loses its appeal towards the second verse, though, but Guru’s rendition of Sachin-Jigar’s tune is not annoying, and thankfully keeps him out of his comfort zone, the high pitch, which unfortunately for his comfort, makes us uncomfortable as listeners.
Sachin-Jigar finally get one song without any apparent interference from the music label (except maybe choice of singer). Sachiya Mohabbatan turns out to be a song that seems like a mélange of two super-hit songs from Maddock Films’ last venture ‘Luka Chuppi’ — ‘Photo’ and ‘Duniyaa’. The tune resembles ‘Duniyaa’, while the arrangements resemble ‘Photo’. Again, the fact that the film is a spoof provides some background as to why the music too must have been made like this. Sachet Tandon, getting songs for other composers as a result of his ‘Bekhayali’ (Kabir Singh) gaining more popularity than its Arijit Singh variant, delivers the melody with finesse, his notes and the occasional grunge on point. The flute (Shirish Malhotra) and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) complement the melody well, and the trademark Punjabi pop beats make the song perfect as a spoofy one. The flute is actually what makes it sound like ‘Photo’ in the first place. Priya Saraiya, appearing in a Bollywood soundtrack after quite some time, pens a nice and sweet Punjabi piece, but nothing we haven’t heard before.
To end the album, we have the mandatory daaru from every film that contains a Punjabi lead character, and another mandate that dictates this song is that it is a T-Series Punjabi pop single by Akash D, who therefore becomes guest composer with the song Sip Sip, used as is in the album. Aditya Dev programs and arranges this one, in the most typical way imaginable, and Guru Bhullar along with the composer himself, renders the cheesy lyrics (also by the composer). The opening synth music especially is really banal, making you reluctant to continue at all. If you do manage to continue, however, you’ll quit soon anyway.


An album devoid of the usual quirks of a Sachin-Jigar album, maybe thanks to the dictatorship of the music label involved, this album does witness them give some temporarily enjoyable party tracks and one melodious romantic song, but nothing compared to their previous works with Maddock Films (Go Goa Gone, Happy Ending, Badlapur, Stree)!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 8 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Main Deewana Tera > Sachiya Mohabbatan > Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda > Dil Todeya > Sip Sip

 

Which is your favourite song from Arjun Patiala? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

REMAKE-GIRI, BAHUT HUI, THAK GAYI HAI ABB JANTA!! (LUKA CHUPPI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, White Noise Studios, Abhijit Vaghani, Tony Kakkar, Goldboy, Dilip Sen, Sameer Sen, Gurmeet Singh & Bob
♪ Lyrics by: White Noise Studios, Anand Bakshi, Nirmaan, Tony Kakkar, Mellow D, Harmanjit, Kunaal Vermaa & Raja
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd February 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 1st March 2019

Luka Chuppi Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Luka Chuppi is a Bollywood film starring Kriti Sanon, Kartik Aaryan, Pankaj Tripathi, Aparshakti Khurrana, and Vinay Pathak. The film is the directorial debut of Laxman Utekar, and is produced by Dinesh Vijan. The film is a social comedy revolving around a couple who decide to enter a live-in relationship, and the problems they face from their relatives and the society in general. The music from Maddock’s productions has usually been good, though there was a slight dip in the quality of the music in Sachin-Jigar’s album to ‘Stree’. Well, here, the music is credited to multiple composers, including Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture White Noise Productions, last heard in ‘Laaj Sharam’ (Veere Di Wedding), Abhijit Vaghani, and the lead ‘composer’ (read remake artist) Tanishk Bagchi. I just call him the lead remake artist, because the other two composers, too, have presented recreations, and coupled with Bagchi’s three remakes, that makes this album full of remakes. So basically, my review is going to be like a race where remakes are pitted against each other: knowing fully well that they have almost zero chance to cross the finish line.


Right from the beginning of the opening track of the album, Poster Lagwa Do, the Sachin-Jigar vibes hit you square in the face. The beats, distinctively similar to those of ‘Johny Johny’ (Entertainment) give away that this song has been worked upon by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R company, White Noise Productions (though i suspect it has been ghost programmed by the duo themselves, because of their close association to Dinesh Vijan). Anyway, the song, which is a remake of Dilip-Sameer’s ‘Yeh Khabar Chapwa Do Akhbaar Mein’ (Aflatoon), rides on the success of ‘Simmba’s ‘Aankh Marey’, in that the makers rope in Mika Singh to do the honours with the male vocals. Well, it doesn’t work half as well as it did in the former song, and another reason for that may be because the female singer there was a more effervescent Neha Kakkar as opposed to an amateur-sounding Sunanda Sharma here. One of the singers who I’d actually like to see the female portions of the song to have been sung by, though, is Nikhita Gandhi, who is instead relegated to an embarrassing two lines of rap that are easy to miss! The composition, though kept intact, gets new lyrics for the antara, and the lyrics have been credited to White Noise Studios too — I wish Sachin-Jigar would follow Pritam’s JAM8 when it comes to crediting individual artists (though their lack of individual credits just makes me believe stronger in my theory that they are the men behind all the music credited to White Noise and just don’t want to be named because of the album being a multicomposers album!) That said, the song is levels below any previous Sachin-Jigar presentation; the beats are dated, there’s no originality or innovativeness in the programming and the song ultimately lacks appeal and repeat value.
The other ‘guest’ composer, Abhijit Vaghani, presents his take on Akhil’s song ‘Khaab’, originally composed by Bob. Duniyaa is a pleasant recreation of the already present original romantic song, with completely different lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, replacing Raja’s lyrics from the original. The new lyrics are sweet, and the new composition for the antara too, is appreciated. Akhil has been roped in to sing this version as well, which is a good choice, as the singer of the original also gets his Bollywood break in the bargain. Dhvani Bhanushali sings the female portions alongside him, and does quite a good job too; she sounds much better in low notes here (though clearly autotuned), than she does in high notes in songs like the recently released T-Series pop single ‘Main Teri Hoon’ by Sachin-Jigar. The flute is quite melodious, and is one of the features taken from the original. Thankfully, the beats of the original, which were quite passable, have been changed and made to sound a bit more melodious, with guitars and strings accompanying the composition.
Tanishk Bagchi, who ‘composes’, or ‘recreates’ the next three songs of the album, starts off with Coca Cola, a funky and more glitzy touch to the original by Tony Kakkar. Of course, Neha Kakkar gets to pitch in, and while her brother’s original composition’s tempo is cranked up quite considerably, she gets to sing a new antara, which seems to end as soon as it starts. Again, the choice of retaining the original singer’s voice is a commendable move. Tanishk’s programming saves the song; it’s uptempo beat and strings make it a fun one-time listen — unfortunately, it is not so fun that I would press the repeat button. There is that infectious digital beat that starts the song off though, and it thankfully plays for quite some times for those who loved it. To Tony Kakkar’s original lyrics are added some new lines by Mellow D — the lines sung by Neha Kakkar and the rap by Young Desi. Obviously enough, this is going to be the next club anthem though, for lack of anything better these days.
Tanishk goes on to present another love song, named Photo, this one being a remake of Karan Sehmbi’s ‘Photo’, composed by Gold Boy. Again, the singer is retained, and again, I commend that decision. Tanishk’s beats are really basic though, and provide nothing new to the original song — which was already sufficiently catchy if this was supposed to be catchier. The flute is a nice attraction, but the original had guitars, which I am missing here. The short length of the song keeps it thankfully not boring, but the repetitive composition by Gold Boy would not have been so pleasant if it had gone on for longer. The singer Karan Sehmbi has a nice folksy texture to his voice, which explains why T-Series backed him for a pop single, and agreed to let him sing its remake, which wasn’t the case three years ago when ‘Soch Na Sake’ (Airlift) was sung by Arijit Singh. Nirmaan’s lyrics are cute, with the lyricist also throwing in a clever self-reference in the second verse. A melodious song, but loses appeal because of the digital beats, which makes it sound more like a pop song than a film song.
The last song, Tu Laung Main Elaachi, a remake of ‘Laung Laachi’s title track by Gurmeet Singh, is probably my least favourite of the album. And there are quite a few reasons for that. First of all, a really sweet Punjabi song sung by a really good Punjabi singer, Mannat Noor, has been redubbed by Tulsi Kumar — the first bad choice. Second, the beats have been degraded in sound; there is no freshness in the song as one should expect from a recreation. It sounds like the song has just been recreated for the sake of doing so. The chorus singers at the beginning and the end are nothing short of irritating! The bass has been increased in the recreation, though, it seems, and wow, I’m sure that required a lot of effort! :/


Luka Chuppi is the result of the remake trend in Bollywood going far overboard. I am not sure how the makers always come up with stupid reasons to justify their including remakes in their albums, but I’m sure nothing can justify completely avoiding original music in your album! Atleast for the sake of art, and music in general, if they would have planned out the music of this album less hastily, maybe it would have been better. And it isn’t like these remakes are great, either! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 = 32

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Duniyaa > Coca Cola > Photo = Poster Lagwa Do > Tu Laung Main Elaachi

Which is your favourite song from Luka Chuppi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A MUFFLED SOUND EXPLOSION!! (PARMANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Srivastava, Dr. Kumar Vishwas, Sachin Sanghvi & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Parmanu Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Parmanu is a Bollywood drama/thriller film starring John Abraham, Boman Irani and Diana Penty, directed by Abhishek Sharma and produced by Zee Studios, JA Entertainment and Kyta Productions. The film revolves around the 1998 bomb test explosions conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan under the leadership of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam during PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s tenure. The film has opened to mixed reviews, but what had me most excited about the film (since the subject matter isn’t really the kind I like) was the music by Sachin-Jigar. Well, Sachin-Jigar and Jeet Gannguli, as I learned after the album released.


Sachin-Jigar April start the album off with a refreshing song Shubh Din, which follows the folksy Gujarati/Rajasthani template to the tee, but still manages to turn out as an entertaining number. They recreate their own ‘Aavi Re Hoon Aavi Re’ (from the Gujarati movie Carry On Kesar), and the song has a catchy instrumental loop after the hookline, which Sachin-Jigar have made sure, hooks the audience. The arrangements give the impression that the makers were going for something grander, but had to settle for less than what they intended. The folksiness doesn’t come out full-fledgedly as one would expect from Sachin-Jigar, but ends up sounding muffled. The vocals by Keerthi Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri are amazing though, as is Sachin-Jigar’s composition, so at least the song is entertaining for as long as it plays.
The next folksy number by Sachin-Jigar, Thare Vaaste, is like a patriotic recreation of their song ‘Chunar’ (ABCD 2), especially lyrically. Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics are aptly poignant and patriotic, but sadly, the composers’ tune doesn’t match up to that level; it fails to move the listener. The anthemic tune gets repetitive after some time, and though Divya Kumar does well in trying to make the song sound energetic, it is again the fault of the muffled-sounding arrangements, that the song doesn’t come to life as would be expected.
Kasumbi, the best song of the album, also sees the duo follow the folksy template, but this time Vayu’s lyrics are Punjabi, in a film set in Rajasthan. This one starts off like another ‘Chunar’ spawn, but soon sets in as a moving patriotic number — the shehnaai is the most remarkable instrument used here; it harks back to the old patriotic songs. Again, the arrangements sound muffled here too (what’s with the poor programming throughout the album?) but Sachin-Jigar’s tune is so strong, it can be overlooked. Also, Divya Kumar gives an amazing performance, especially in that gem of a hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are beautiful, incorporating the word ‘Kasumbi’, which is probably the name for the saffron colour associated with patriotism in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
The last two songs composed by Sachin-Jigar in this album, have soothing tunes and less of a folksy impact than the previous songs. Sapna is the trademark Sachin-Jigar romantic melody (a la ‘Meet’ from ‘Simran’) in its composition, but the lyrics by Sachin Sanghvi are not romantic at all. Overall it is a pleasant listen, which Sachin-Jigar doing their signature method of repeating an instrumental loop after the hookline. (The loop in this song sounds a lot like the one in ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ from “Meri Pyaari Bindu”). Arijit Singh is himself in the song, and carries it off like he carries off every song he’s ever carried off. The guitars are enjoyable and soothing, and the sarangi is beautiful, and the song itself is fortunately short — any longer and it would’ve been too long.
The last song by Sachin-Jigar, De De Jagah, is yet another in the same vein as ‘Sapna’, but this time, the lyricist (poet and politician Dr. Kumar Vishwas) complements it with romantic lyrics. What strikes me right away, yet again, is that something is wrong with the mixing, making Yasser Desai’s voice sound like it has been recorded on WhatsApp. Sachin-Jigar’s vibrant composition is one of the best of theirs over the period of 2016-2018, and Yasser Desai, barring the bad use of his vocals, tries to do his best, and succeeds fairly enough. The guitars and tablas complement each other surprisingly well, and the harmonium provides the soul in the song. The tune of the hookline is what will get you hooked to this song, just like songs traditionally are supposed to do.
Now, the reason I described that as Sachin-Jigar’s last song, is because there’s a kind of guest composer we have in the album; he has been waiting patiently for his turn, and I’m more than happy to talk about his song. The man in question in Jeet Gannguli, who has somehow bagged a romantic (read Mohit Suri-like sob-inducing) song in a movie like this. Jitni Dafa is one of those songs we have heard enough of in Bollywood, and I can’t believe the makers would proactively damage their own music album by including such a song in the album. It starts off painfully simple, and until those ‘Aashiqui 2’-ish beats start, it isn’t that painful, but when they do start, you keep waiting for the song to end. Rashmi-Virag write great lyrics, but hey, I’m quite sure John’s character in the film has time to weep like this at such a critical time and dire situation. And the singer is Yasser Desai, trying his best to be a mix of Mustafa Zahid, Arijit Singh, Saim Bhatt and Atif Aslam.


Parmanu has a soundtrack that mostly sticks to the point (barring that guest song) but something is definitely wrong with the arrangements; if they had been better mixed and mastered, the sound would’ve been grander and more enjoyable!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 39

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kasumbi > Shubh Din > De De Jagah > Thare Vaaste = Sapna > Jitni Dafa

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 19 (from previous albums) + 01 = 20

Which is your favourite song from Parmanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SACHIN-JIGAR’S GANGSTA BLUES!! (HASEENA PARKAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Kirthi Shetty & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 8th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Haseena Parkar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Haseena Parkar is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Shraddha Kapoor in the titular role, and with Siddhanth Kapoor and Ankur Bhatia playing key characters in the film. The film is directed by Apoorva Lakhia, produced by Nahid Khan. It revolves around the life of Haseena Parkar, Dawood Ibrahim’s sister. It witnesses Shraddha Kapoor trying out a role that might just transform her career to a new phase, different from all those annoying girl-next-door-who-is-also-a-singer roles. The music in Lakhia’s films is generally inconsequential, but here he ropes in Sachin-Jigar, a duo who I know, won’t compose for films where music is just an attraction. Anyway, this is their sixth and penultimate album of the year (we are left with ‘Parmanu’ which will release in December) so let’s see how they fare after the above average ‘Bhoomi’!


1. Tere Bina / Tere Bina (Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Priya Saraiya / Priya Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s shortest album of the year (not counting ‘Hindi Medium’ in which they did only two songs) starts with a romantic ballad that really gives a cordial invitation to those goosebumps, and the goosebumps on your skin in turn have a nice gala time for the entire duration of the song. Of course, the makers opt for Arijit, but I must say this is the best Sachin-Jigar have used Arijit this year. His voice is best suited for this, unlike in ‘Haareya’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) which was sung in Ayushmann style, and ‘Laagi Na Choote’ (A Gentleman) which was in everyday Arijit style. But this one has an entire different charisma and charm to it. Priya’s sugary voice returns after the duo autotuned it too much in ‘Baat Ban Jaaye’ (A Gentleman), and so, she sounds amazing as always. The Priya-Arijit duo really gives off big ‘Jaise Mera Tu’ (Happy Ending) vibes. The composition, however, is the least Sachin-Jigar-ish I would expect it to be. In fact, it has more shades of Rahman’s composing style, or some places even Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The hookline is so mellifluous, you just can’t get it out of your head if you listen to the song for just two times. The Antaras are amazing, and I especially appreciated Priya’s portions, because of her beautiful voice that melts in your ears! (Did that sound awkward? Well, it does!! Just like sugar melts in your mouth, her voice melted in my ears and it was bliss!) Sachin-Jigar excel with the strings this time and Tapas Roy’s creative plucked strings again feature as one of the best parts of the song. The song itself starts with Tapas Roy’s plucked instruments, like a beautiful folksy song, full of rawness and earthiness. The beats throughout the song are simple though, and resemble slightly Rahman’s beats in ‘Maahi Ve’ (Highway) and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s beats in ‘Tere Naina’ (Chandni Chowk To China). The flute interludes are scintillating. The Reprise Version of the song has the duo rearrange the song on a more haunting base, with wind blowing, and piano notes, and dramatic percussion. Priya handles it solo, and that helps people like me who love her voice get attracted to it. The lyrics of both versions are by her too, and she writes beautiful lines, comparing how the two lovers are incomplete without each other, to things like “What if the sky was colourless?” and it is just so fun to listen to these metaphors. 🙂 A beautiful romantic song, with an apt sad version too!

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original, 4/5 for the Reprise

 

2. Bantai

Singers ~ DIVINE & Kirthi Shetty, Lyrics by ~ Kirthi Shetty

Apoorva Lakhia’s ‘Shootout At Lokhandwala’ had an utterly ridiculous music album, but the song everyone still remembers is Mika’s gangster song, ‘Aye Ganpat’. Now, Lakhia tries to make Sachin-Jigar recreate that vibe in ‘Haseena Parkar’. The duo’s composition is obviously better than Mika’s composition for ‘Ganpat’. The hook is especially catchy. It is the antara where things start going helter-skelter, and the song starts to fall out. It has a horrible composition. (Maybe because right before that, we hear them pouring alcohol into glasses — clearly, it got to the character’s heads so Sachin-Jigar must have deliberately made it a weirdish composition. 😂). Mumbai rapper DIVINE comes on board, supported by Saavn’s movie reviewer, Kirthi Shetty of ‘Bhai ke Rapchik Reviews’. The vocals are suitable for such a song, and increase the repeat value, but just to an extent. The lyrics by Kirthi Shetty, too, are apt for the situation. The arrangements are quite underwhelming, but you can’t expect much more than this. Sachin-Jigar do not fare exceptionally at this, but manage to create a sketchy gangster song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Piya Aa

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava

I guess, just as a gangster song is a regular in Apoorva Lakhia’s films, so is a Pancham-da flavoured item song. So now Sachin-Jigar make that for him. And though my choice of words makes me sound as if I’m irritated, I’m not. The song is good, with a punchy vibe to it. Sachin-Jigar very exceptionally channel their inner R.D. Burman, and churn out a melody to match the catchiness of ‘Parda’ (Once Upon A Time In Mumbaai), ‘Ice Cream’ (The Xposé) and ‘Balma’ (Khiladi 786), some Pancham-da flavoured songs which weren’t by him! 😃 The hookline is trademark Pancham, and you might suffer from a serious bout of nodding your head side to side in that signature dance step of such songs. 😂 The arrangements are the usual fare for such songs, with trumpets and the sax leading, and those bongo-congo percussions that make Pancham songs what they are. Sunidhi’s energetic vocals help make the song more lively, whilst Vayu writes suitable lyrics. The song is short, and so is my review for it. An almost perfect R.D. Burman styled song!

Rating: 3.5/5


Haseena Parkar is one of those albums, like ‘Bhoomi’ that Sachin-Jigar seem to have picked up for experience. They get a chance to compose stuff here, that they never get to compose in their usual rom-com fares, and they do quite a good job at it too. With only three songs, this one is quite a Lilliput of an album, but Sachin-Jigar prove that they have it in them!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 2.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Bina > Tere Bina (Reprise) > Piya Aa > Bantai

 

Which is your favourite song from Haseena Parkar? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

SACHIN-JIGAR STAY GROUNDED!! (BHOOMI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Anvita Dutt, Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 28th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Bhoomi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bhoomi is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Aditi Rao Hydari and Sidhant Gupta in lead roles. The film has been directed by ‘Mary Kom’ and ‘Sarbjit’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Sandeep Singh. The film is a revenge saga revolving around a father trying to avenge his daughter, who is a rape victim. Now, this filmmaker Omung Kumar, has been known for making loud and sobby dramatic films, but also, both of his previous films have had amazing music albums as well, featuring in the Music Mastani’s Top 20 Albums of the respective years they released in. While ‘Mary Kom’ featured music by newcomers Shashi-Shivamm, and ‘Sarbjit’ featured a nice mix of T-Series-affiliated artists (Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli), and newcomers Shail-Pritesh, this time Omung raises the bar by roping in highly busy composers Sachin-Jigar. Now this is probably the first time I remember seeing the duo compose for a drama like this, so it’ll be something new for them and for us. But expectations are still sky high because of Omung! So let’s see how far above the bhoomi (ground) Sachin-Jigar’s music flies!


1. Trippy Trippy

Singers ~ Neha Kakkar, Benny Dayal, Brijesh Shandilya & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s fifth album of the year starts off with a song I can’t believe they have made!! The song is a club song with a composition that I would expect from someone like Badshah or Yo Yo Honey Singh, and not Sachin-Jigar! The composition is very weird, and not in the good way. It is basically just a typical item song composition, and coming from Sachin-Jigar, that is quite shocking. The male portions especially, are very disappointing. Those are actually the parts that could’ve been the best. Also, the antara is quite similar to their own “Teri Mahima Aprampaar” (Entertainment). The hookline is just Badshah belching out the words in an expressionless tone. Here, it is evident the composers were trying to experiment, just to make the song sound a bit better, but sadly, they couldn’t make those experiments work. For example, the flute and dhols arrangement was clearly done to increase the quirkiness of the song, but it backfires, sadly. The beats too, aren’t addictive or anything — it is just a straightforward song to listen to and forget. The vocals by Neha Kakkar are very disappointing after that amazing rendition of hers in ‘Ghungta’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz)! Here she doesn’t even sound half as energetic as she did there! Benny Dayal and Brijesh Shandilya (and of course Badshah) are used very less, and their portions are just repeated over and over. Good, because those parts are very irritating. Also, the ‘Hicky hicky’ sung by Neha is kind of irritating too! The lyrics by Priya Saraiya are the usual fare we get to hear in such songs, and nothing really makes sense. A song that must be a mistake!!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Lag Ja Gale

Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Next up, the composers present a romantic song, very saccharine-sweet, and following a Sufi template to the tee. Again, it is shocking that Sachin-Jigar’s music gets so predictable, but let’s not complain just yet. The composition here is very beautiful, and doesn’t take time to like. The mukhda and antara are especially very beautiful. It is the hook line “tere mere pyaar nu“, that is very predictable and sounds out of place, in an otherwise beautiful song. I can’t remember which, but it sounds an awful lot like a very famous 90s song too. The presence of Rahat almost impeded me from liking the song a lot. His voice has been making songs heavy and inaccessible these days (Like it did for ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ from ‘Baadshaho’), but thankfully, Sachin-Jigar have employed his voice prudently, and not overdone the high pitch or the aalaaps, and it comes out very beautiful. The “Rab Varga” loop gives the song a very unconventionally abrupt start, and it’s one of the best effects of the song. The arrangements by the duo are the trademark Sufi dholaks and tablas, but because of the composition, you bear with it. Also, a wonderful sarangi keeps you engaged throughout the song! The major part of the song also has acoustic guitars, making it a kind of fusion between Sufi and acoustic guitars. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are very cute, and very simple-sweet. A rare song by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan that will be known for simplicity! I wish there was some innovation though, as it has turned out very predictable!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Will You Marry Me

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

After two slightly disappointing songs, Sachin-Jigar get to make a wedding song for the film. Now, this song seems to be one of those disappointing songs which grow with time, because that’s what happened with me. I found it a bit weird at first, but in the successive listens, I started to like it bit by bit. Now this is purely subjective, but I still think Sachin-Jigar didn’t try to make this song (or any song from this film) complicated and layered, and that’s why this is happening. The songs are straightforward, something we hardly get from Sachin-Jigar, and that’s why we might be disappointed at first. Anyway, the composition is a peppy wedding number, complete with Punjabi phrases and effective Indian wedding arrangements. The hookline seems very cheesy at first, but becomes catchy later on. The beginning is quite entertaining, with those dialogues, and after that, Jonita’s weird programmed voice singing something gibberish, I believe. That is one of the best parts of the song. The female chorus too, is very entertaining, and the word “ponga pandit” specifically caught my interest. Lyricist Anvita Dutt has utilised it so nicely. As the hookline gets closer though, the song increases its heard-before-ness, and it becomes an ordinary wedding song by the time the hookline arrives, though it is catchy. The antara is no better. Vocals are entertaining, especially Jonita’s, and the female backing vocalists. Divya gets the same part to sing twice, and he sounds good too, but it is the composition of his parts that sounds too flat. Arrangements consist of digital beats accompanied by Indian wedding instruments like the shehnaai (wonderful interlude on that!), dhols etc. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are very innovative at parts and very ordinary at parts. A confusing song! You don’t know whether you like it or not!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Kho Diya

Singer ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Now comes what I’ve been expecting from Sachin-Jigar ever since ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ released and I loved all the songs. After that, frankly, I didn’t love any Sachin-Jigar song as much as I loved the song ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’, in any of their albums that released. But now, in ‘Bhoomi’, they come up with a deserving opponent for ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ with this song, another ghazal, and in my opinion, even better than ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ itself. I’ll explain why. The composition is genuinely ghazal-like, as in an actual, authentic ghazal! Though that song was also a ghazal, it did have minor Bollywood-ish touches. But in this song, Sachin-Jigar do not bow down to peer pressure in order to make a Bollywood-friendly song. The song still does carry many nuances of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s style of composition though. I sincerely hope SLB catches this song and ropes Sachin-Jigar in for his next project! The antara is one of the most beautiful compositions I’ve heard in a while. The arrangements too, are amazing, with soothing tablas, divine manjeeras, beautiful Guitars, and scintillating strings that provide an atmosphere of love and divinity. The water drop sounds, so characteristic of SLB, sound beautiful. Sachin Sanghvi says this is his first solo song in Bollywood (He also sang a duet with Shreya Ghoshal in ‘Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story’ before this), and he does his solo debut in a smashing manner! His voice has that amazing metallic touch, which people might mistake for programming, but it is his raw voice! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are yet again, one of the most brilliant she’s written this year. A lovely number that is surely going to stay with me for a long time!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Daag

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The pathos enters now, as it always does. Of course, because this is an Omung Kumar film after all. There has to be an overtly dramatic sad song. And that happens to be this song. Now, the composition is really good, if I have to judge as per it’s genre. But as an individual song, this doesn’t take me anywhere. After the magic that the former song had me possessed with, this song falls flat! The duo try to lift it up with an intriguing and mysterious arrangement (this guitar riffs do the trick), but how much can a song be able to be saved by good arrangements if the composition isn’t appealing? Sukhwinder adds to the tedium, with his heavy voice, and it sounds very uncomfortable. Even though the composition is so poignant, it all sounds fake due to the overcooked nature of the music and vocals. The hookline itself too, is very tedious. It sounds like something that should have released around 2008. Sadly, this one isn’t memorable at all!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Jai Mata Di

Singers ~ Ajay Gogavale & Sanjay Dutt, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani

To wrap up the album, Sachin-Jigar present a devotional song. Now Ganeshotsav has ended, and Navratri is about to start, and with the film opening just one day after Navratri starts, it seems an apt decision to include a song entitled ‘Jai Mata Di’ in the album. Now, the song is primarily a very dramatic devotional song again, to make it fit with Omung Kumar standards of drama. However, it fares a bit better than that one, thanks to the divine touch. The composition is amazing, and Sachin-Jigar mould themselves into a very trademark Ajay-Atul mode to compose this one. Actually, if Ajay-Atul had composed for the ‘Sarkar’ series, and the chants would’ve been ‘Jai Mata Di’ instead of ‘Govinda’, then this would have been the perfect background score for the ‘Sarkar’ franchise. To add to the Ajay-Atul feel, Sachin-Jigar even rope in Ajay as the lead vocalist. As always, he aces the song. Sanjay Dutt starts the song with a mantra, bt his interventions throughout the actual song when he sings “Jai Maa Jai Maa’, sound better. The arrangements are good, and Especially the strings are amazing. Other sounds like the tabla, and the pathos-filled composition make it sound like yet another SLB song, a la ‘Gajanana’ (Bajirao Mastani), and ‘Dola Re Dola’ (Devdas). This song isn’t something to enjoy with your earphones, but something to experience in theatres!

Rating: 3.5/5


Bhoomi is a great example of an album composed by talented composers, but which suffers due to their inexperience in the genre of drama. Sachin-Jigar have composed for drama films very less; they usually go for rom-coms or musicals, but in this one, their discomfort is visible while composing for such a film. They still do try to add their own elements into the album, like the quirkiness of ‘Will You Marry Me’, which diffuses into thin air later on in the song. The best song in definitely ‘Kho Diya’, which I’m sure you will agree with, and so might they themselves. Anyway, it is one of those rare occasions where Sachin-Jigar disappoint, and it will surely pass!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 3 + 3.5 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kho Diya > Lag Ja Gale > Will You Marry Me = Jai Mata Di > Daag > Trippy Trippy

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhoomi? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: SIMPLE REHNE DE!! (SIMRAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Simran Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Baras Ja” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Baras Ja” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ To hear “Baras Ja” on YouTube:


Simran is an upcoming Bollywood drama film, directed by Hansal Mehta, produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Shailesh R. Singh, and Amit Agarwal. The film stars Kangana Ranaut, Soham Shah, Mark Justice, Hiten Kumar and Esha Tiwari Pande in crucial roles. The film revolves around a Gujarati lady settled in the United States of America, who gets involved in crime. The film does seem quirky and very racy, and definitely very humorous. Now, Hansal Mehta usually does not rely on music to carry his films forward, as is evident from the fact that out of his recent film, ‘Shahid’ had just one song (not even released properly by a music label), and ‘Aligarh’ had no songs. Then there was ‘Citylights’, which, due to it being a joint venture with the Bhatts, had a stellar album by Jeet Gannguli. This film seems to be Hansal’s lightest film in a long time, and the result is that we can read the names of Sachin-Jigar in the credits, for music. Now, roping in Sachin-Jigar can’t mean anything except that Hansal wants great music for this film, doesn’t it? Accordingly, Sachin-Jigar have scored six songs for the film, and very situational too. Still, before I reveal much, let’s see how the music fares!!


1. Lagdi Hai Thaai

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Doodho nahaao, phoolo phalo tum,
LED jaisi karna glow tum,
Sabko duayein yeh naseeb rakhna,
Jodi sada ye muskuraaye!
Maike ki photo ik kareeb rakhna,
Aisa na ho ki bhooli jaaye, jaaye, jaaye!
Jadon nache baby sajj dhajj, Lagdi hai thaai!”

– Vayu

It must be so difficult to compose for seven film albums in a year, but Sachin-Jigar are up and about, composing for the fourth album, which happens to be ‘Simran’. The first song matches Sachin-Jigar’s roots, as it is a Gujarati track by soul, but Punjabi by sound. Actually, it’s a beautifully thought out fusion of Gujarati and Punjabi, something nobody would ever be able to do this well and this seamlessly! The composition is perfectly suitable for a song that should make you get up and dance, and the desi touch, both Punjabi and Gujarati, add to the enjoyability of the song. Both the mukhda and the antara have been composed on the same tune, and Sachin-Jigar follow the trend to keep the song short and more appealing. The short length never hampers the beauty of the song. The hookline is amazing as well, but it is the arrangements that makes the song sound amazing. When it starts, you may be quick enough to dismiss it as yet another typical Punjabi number, added into the album just to be another ‘London Thumakda’ (Queen), but later you realise the magic, when the Gujarati dhols begin to awe you. The brass band (Trumpets by Kishore Sodha) is used very nicely here, and without sounding stale or heard-before, it provides a nice and fresh touch. But what is really amazing, is that wonderful flute (Naveen Kumar) which has been played in a very typical Gujju style, and it does nothing but inspire you to learn how to play flute! 😛 But I’m sure this kind of a flautist would take years to become so good! The vocals are amazing. At first, I thought Guru Randhawa has been chosen just because he has a history of many pop songs with T-Series, but turns out, he has given the Punjabi touch to the song very genuinely, and keeps aside all his pop song background for this one filmy song! Jonita is a surprise package; singing in Gujarati and all — though I think she is Gujarati. Anyway, she sings the old lady portions with as much ease as she does the lead heroine’s portions! In fact, she sings the Dadi Maa portions in Gujarati even better!! One thing I didn’t enjoy was the drunk part at the end, it seemed forced. Vayu’s lyrics are some of the most positive wedding song lyrics I’ve seen in Bollywood, a place where people come to weddings only to eat, drink and dance. But here, Vayu makes the characters sing things like “LED Jaisi Karna Glow Tum!” I swear, it is one of the most positive blessings I’ve heard in a Bollywood wedding song, and so less dramatic than the blessings they used to sing in songs like ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kal Ho Naa Ho) and all! All in all, this is a very enjoyable Gujju-Punjabi fusion, with amazing arrangements to accompany the energetic vocals!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Pinjra Tod Ke

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jannat ke saaye, jannat le aaye hai,
Baahon mein, ab zindagi,
Kismat ki dori jo, baandhi woh kholi,
Jeene chali, main abb zindagi,
Pinjra tod ke, tod ke, udd jaana hai,
Baahein kholke, kholke, udd jaana hai!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song starts off as a mellow composition, with piano notes almost assuring you that this is going to be a sad number. However, it is wonderful to see how Sachin-Jigar seamlessly change the mood of the song, making it uplifting and motivational as the song progresses. That is almost like a symbol infused into the song by Sachin-Jigar. The lyrics by Priya Saraiya talk about breaking free of restrictions, and flying freely — so Sachin-Jigar have probably structured the song in a way to resemble that, starting off very slowly, but breaking free subsequently! What a wonderful form the song takes on, once you realise that! Sachin-Jigar’s composition is nothing new, it is the usual Sunidhi pathos, but it works wonders even though it is heard-before. After all, it isn’t necessary for things to be complicated to like them, is it? The hookline is very motivating, as is the second antara, a sprightly conclusion to the otherwise soft song. It takes on a more energetic tempo and composition, and even has more energetic arrangements, since the electric guitars and drums truly break out in that part. The rest of the arrangements have a soothingly Western touch — starting off with amazing piano, progressing into a euphoric acoustic guitar-led arrangement, until the aforementioned second antara arrives. The interludes contain a wonderful “Oley Oley“, by a backing vocalist I suspect is Jonita Gandhi, she sounds exactly like her. This type of song nowadays, usually goes to Sunidhi, and she aces it, as always. It’s nice to see her finally getting recognised not only as a singer of those upbeat numbers she was terribly typecast for in the late 2000s. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics, as mentioned before, are motivating and uplifting, in the true sense! This is probably Priya’s best work in a long time! A beautiful song, with a simple and heard-before vibe, but still manages to impress monumentally!!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Meet

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Tu hi mera meet hai ji,
Tu hi meri preet hai ji,
Jo labon se ho sake naa judaa,
Aisa mera geet hai ji!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song happens to be a very happy-go-lucky romantic song, sung by Arijit, the kind of song Sachin-Jigar have usually done many times with Atif. Since their songs with Arijit have always been unconventional and never-heard-before, this comes as a surprise, as it conforms to the regular Arijit school of romance. However, the composition is really charming, and has you hooked (at least to the hookline) in the first listen. In the subsequent listens you “try” to get hooked to the mukhda and antara. Sadly, I still can’t recall the tunes of these portions immediately, even after having listened to the song at least six times by now. Does that mean the song is bad? Not at all. The song is amazing. Sachin-Jigar weave magic even with those notes that evoke memories of compositions by other composers, but doesn’t really evoke memories of any song in particular. It has the charm of an old Bollywood song, and it is the kind of composition to which we would say “Ah, the nostalgia”, after listening to it after a long time somewhere in the future. It is for this reason that the song gets such a huge repeat value even though it isn’t hooking as such. The hook has wonderful variations Arijit takes not every time, so they remain exclusive, but you keep waiting for the times he does take those variations! The arrangements are just as soothing as the composition; again, a wonderful piano piece opens the song, coupled with a magical and fairy-tale-like strings portion, until the Acoustic guitars come in to lighten up the mood. The whole thing sounds so fulfilling with that wonderful composition. The guitar riff repeats throughout the song. The interlude has a nice flute portion, which keeps you listening, if not hooked. Arijit aces such songs, and does so yet again. Again, I must mention those wonderful aalaaps of his, in the hookline. Priya writes amazing lyrics here too, but here they’re quite simple, even more simple than ‘Pinjra Tod Ke’, and has a plain and straightforward theme — love. A charming love song, with simplicity ruling it.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Single Rehne De

Singers ~ Shalmali Kholgade & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Mere dad bole karle shaadi, varna marr jaayegi boodhi daadi,
Shaadi kar, shaadi kar, shaadi kar, aakkho din shaadi kar,
Aur koi kaam nahi hai kya??”

– Vayu

A laugh riot arrives next, with a song that’s evidently about the main character trying to convince her father to let her stay single. There is actually very less by way of composition in the song, whatever little there is, just keeps repeating. The song is more like a rap, but it is the lyrics that hold it higher than it would have been. Vayu cracks you up with humorous lines that usually don’t find their way into songs; they are typical to scripts of rom-coms, but I find it very cool for them to find their way into a song. The production too, is good, but very repetitive again. Nevertheless, it goes with the unconventional nature of the lyrics. Shalmali Kholgade renders the rap with a feisty attitude, and Divya Kumar, relegated to the background does his one line well. Shalmali says the conversational portions of the song, at the beginning in such a funny, humorous way, that you start to get interested in the song due to her! Not a very fresh composition, but fresh lyrics and vocals, and even arrangements, which are sadly repeated too much!

Rating: 4/5

 

5. Simran

Singer ~ Jigar Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Chulbuli hai, chulbuli hai, nakchadhi hai, manchali hai,
Palak jhapakte falak churaa le apni Simran!
Jaani anjaani, thodi si deewaani,
Deewaana sabko banaa de apni Simran!
Ho, suljha ke hi khud hi yeh badhaye apne dil aur dimaag ki uljhan!
Oye oye oye Simran, alhad si Simran!
Na jaane tu chali re kahaan!”

– Priya Saraiya

The title song which we heard in the trailer is presented to us next, and it is this song which is actually the one that took the most time for me to like. The composition is very likeable, and has a lilting charm to it, in a very playful way, and has a charming ‘Barfi’-esque vibe to it, with the numerous sound effects and the whole description of the main character. The composition is great, if you look at it, but the arrangements confused me. Firstly, I was apprehensive about them because they were so similar to the ‘Barfi’ title track, with the whole accordion, mandolin and vocal sound effects, that I wasn’t sure if I liked them! I love ‘Barfi’, but I just felt weird about this song being so close to that. Later on, I started appreciating the arrangements, because of their lilting European touch and it was definite that Sachin-Jigar’s music would be inspired by Pritam’s as they were his disciples after all! Jigar has sung the song himself, and he has carried it out very well, and his raw, Un-autotuned vocals make the song even better as it sounds more natural and casual! The lyrics by Priya too, do a great job in acquainting us with the character of Simran, and her nature. A good title song, with an amazing arrangement.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

♪ Bonus Song

♪ Baras Ja

Singer ~ Mohit Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jo nainon mein hai boondein,
Inhe rukhsaar ko, jee bhar ke chhoone de zara…
Ae dil, baras jaa, baras jaa na!
Abb toh aakar bhigo de tu mujhe!”

– Priya Saraiya

Now this song released later, a few days after T-Series had released the “Full Album”. Coincidentally, it had flooded in Mumbai on that day, and they came with a song called ‘Baras Ja’ the same night, so maybe they were waiting. 😶 Anyway, the song is probably the best, and least simple song on the soundtrack. It has a very complicated tune, but in spite of that, it is so easily loveable! It starts with a very sublime sound of the matka, and again, a soothing flute portion (Sachin-Jigar have really gotten it right with the flute in this album!!) that ensures you that this song was worth the wait! The composition is beautiful, very 90s, and very earthy at the same time, being very soothing. The antara is very, very amazingly composed, and Sachin-Jigar mix elements of Pritam’s and Rahman’s style of composition, to present to us a song, that is rooted to Indian music, especially in the arrangements. The song is decorated with beautiful flute pieces, and the Indian percussion really helps give it that earthy feel. Wonderful piano notes provide the much needed Western touch to the song too, but the Indian-ness overpowers it. Mohit Chauhan reminds us of his ‘Tum Se Hi’ (Jab We Met) days, and croons the song just as mellifluously. He does get a beautiful song all to himself after a long time, after having two songs by Pritam in ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’, sharing space with a co-singer in both of them. This is his first solo song after a long time! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics again, are very effective in bringing out the romance, and help give the song another thing to boast about. If it had been released earlier, it would’ve been easier for people to find, with all the other songs of the album, and got more audience! I am sad because this is definitely the best of the album!!

Rating: 5/5


Simran is yet another beautiful album from Sachin-Jigar. After three albums this year, out of which one was a multicomposer one, they strike gold yet again with their fourth one. I definitely think we can attribute the beauty of this album to one and only one reason — that it’s a solo composer album, and the director Hansal Mehta was clear in what he wanted. The freedom and creative liberty given to Sachin-Jigar is evident, because they’ve made some of the most beautiful melodies, without making things too complicated. That shows us how things can be made more attractive by following a simple formula — “Simple Rehne De!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Baras Ja = Pinjra Tod Ke > Meet = Simran = Lagdi Hai Thaai > Single Rehne De

 

Which is your favourite song from Simran? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂