THE REMAKE REBELLION CONTINUES! (BAAGHI 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Vishal-Shekhar, Rochak Kohli, Pranaay Rijia, Sachet-Parampara, Bappi Lahiri & René Bendali
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Tanishk Bagchi, Panchhi Jalonvi, Ginny Diwan, Gurpreet Saini, Gautam G. Sharma & René Bendali
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th March 2020
♪ Movie Released On: 6th March 2020

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Baaghi 3 Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 3 is an Bollywood action film starring Tiger Shroff, Shraddha Kapoor, and Riteish DeshmukhThe film is directed by Ahmed Khan and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. Introduction to this film franchise is futile, everyone knows about it and everyone also knows how it is just stretching itself longer than it can hold. Ah, well, going by the reviews, I can see a ‘Baaghi 4’ has bleak prospects, but that is all the more reason for the filmmaker to actually make a ‘Baaghi 4’. Anyway, the film franchise boasted of an all-original album for the first film, followed by a bearable album for the sequel. Here comes the second sequel in the franchise, and in this age of remakes and recreations, I’m not surprised that the first four songs of ‘Baaghi 3’ are remakes! Hoots and cheers for the remake artist Tanishk Bagchi for handling two of these remakes, while Vishal-Shekhar successfully claimed rights to their song ‘Dus Bahane’ and remade it themselves, and Pranaay comes back to recreate his theme song that features in all ‘Baaghi’ films till now. As such, one awaits the original compositions by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli. Let’s see just how well this remake rebellion fares.


Vishal-Shekhar risk entering a multicomposer album in order to salvage their 2005 hit ‘Dus Bahane’ (Dus) which is the opening song for ‘Baaghi 3’. Dus Bahane 2.0 definitely lacks the punch that the original had, and just increasing the tempo of the original track makes the song sound a bit weird, making K.K. and Shaan’s voices sound highly processed. Tulsi Kumar’s portions are awkwardly low in pitch, and composed really uncreatively. That kind of makes me think if Vishal-Shekhar really did contribute any new melody to the remake or just asked Meghdeep Bose to create a ‘Vishal-Shekhar Mix’ or something, of the Tanishk Version. That being said, the beats are well placed, and the song works as a crowd-pleaser, since this is clearly what pleases the crowd these days.

Moving on to Tanishk’s actual remakes, he picks up yet another Bappi Lahiri classic after ‘Yaar Bina Chain Kahan Re’ was remade in ‘Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan’. This time ‘Ek Aankh Maarun’ (Tohfa) gets chosen to be recreated. The song’s catchphrase Bhankas becomes the title of the remake, and all that I notice in the first listen is the good choice of singers — Dev Negi and Jonita Gandhi. They bring the fun of the song to the forefront, and while Bagchi’s beats are just a modern mix of South kuthu beats with that 80s dhakkachika rhythm, the beats kind of work to the song’s favour. Songs like this do not really need their lyrics to be talked about, so I will do just that and go on to Tanishk’s next remake in the album, this time that of a foreign song, Do You Love Me by René Bendali. The song has already been remade by an English pop artist TroyBoi, and now T-Series picks it up for a Hindi reinterpretation. The Arabian setup isn’t new to Bollywood; we have had many original Hindi songs better than this, with the same musical setting. The new compositions with Hindi lyrics barely fit into the hook, but the creativity in the programming and beats makes it worth a listen. Nikhita gets not much space to shine, with very simplistic lines to sing, and before you know it, the song is thankfully over. Also, the Hindi lyricist for the new lyrics hasn’t been mentioned, so I’m guessing it is Tanishk.

Moving over to the franchise theme song by Pranaay, Get Ready to Fight Reloaded, which is probably the most ignored song from every ‘Baaghi’ album, but the makers still seem to be revamping it in hopes that it will get noticed by the audience this time around. The first time, it released as a single after the entire album released, so it went under the radar, while in the second album, it was very badly promoted. And this time, I finally do feel like it will get noticed. First of all, Pranaay packs it with a punch, and some interesting elements like EDM, electronic tablas, whistles, and a groovy beat coupled with Siddharth Basrur’s powerful vocals. The song doesn’t try too hard to be a ‘theme’, as in it doesn’t try too hard to do too much just to stick in the audience’s head, like the previous two versions of it, did. There is also a melodious antara to the song, and Ginny Diwan’s lyrics too make the song worthy of your attention. So this year, we saw the third version of ‘Bezubaan’ in ‘Street Dancer’ failing, but we get to see the third version of ‘Get Ready to Fight’, succeed in the same year. 🙂

Lastly, the two original, melodious songs of the album, one each by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli, two of the music composers that really impressed me with their original music last year. Sachet-Parampara follow their usual ‘Khwabfaroshi’ (Jabariya Jodi) and ‘Dilbara’ (Pati Patni Aur Woh) template in Faaslon Mein, a melancholic Bhatt-ish song that makes you wonder why nobody has taken them to Vishesh Films’ office yet. The piano, intense never-ending lines of singing, followed by a line of singing without any music in the background, and Parampara joining as background vocalist halfway through, the song contains all the standard elements of a Sachet-Parampara song, and that is scary — it means they have been typecast so soon into their career. The song ends with a brilliant strings piece accompanied by a chorus, and even though the composition seems underwhelming, at least Sourav Roy with his arrangements and Sachet with his vocals, have done a good job.

Rochak Kohli brings on board Shaan for his song Tujhe Rab Mana, getting him his second song in the album, if ‘Dus Bahane’ can be counted since it didn’t make him re-dub anything new. The song is a melodious ode to brotherhood, sort of like Rochak’s friendship anthems ‘Atrangi Yaari’ (Wazir) and ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety). However, the song is musically set in a different space, intermediate to both of those aforementioned songs. Not as lively as the former, but not as melancholic as the latter, it finds its niche somewhere in the middle. The composition is sweet and uses the phrase “Tere jaisa yaar kahaan” in its lyrics, so that is enough to strike the brotherly string in Indians. 😂 Shaan delivers the piece with finesse, and Rochak aptly arranges strings, guitars and piano pieces to accompany the composition. However, I wouldn’t voluntarily go and listen to this song, it being around 5 minutes long.


As expected, ‘Baaghi 3’ relies on its remakes to propel it forward. And when the remakes actually do seem to be made and promoted with more efforts than the original tracks, it says a lot. Rochak and Sachet-Parampara’s songs are good but just that. The only great song was the ‘Get Ready to Fight’ remake by Pranaay. An album where not even one song is memorable.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 5 + 7.5 + 6 + 6.5 = 36.5

Album Percentage: 60.83%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Get Ready To Fight Reloaded > Tujhe Rab Mana > Faaslon Mein = Bhankas > Dus Bahane 2.0 > Do You Love Me

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DANCE, ROMANCE AUR GANGSTERPANTI!! (SAHEB BIWI AUR GANGSTER 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rana Mazumder, Siddharth Pandit, Anjjan Bhattacharya & Madan Mohan
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Revant Shergill, Sandeep Nath, Kausar Munir & Raja Mehdi Ali Khan
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 26th July 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th July 2018

Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 is a Bollywood action / crime thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Jimmy Shergill, Chitrangada Singh and Mahie Gill in lead roles, directed by Tigmanshu Dhulia and produced by Rahul Mittra and Tigmanshu Dhulia. The film opened to mostly negative reviews, but thankfully, we music reviewers don’t have to poke our little noses into that. The music album of the film is primarily composed by Rana Mazumder, who made a spectacular  debut last year with Tigmanshu Dhulia’s ‘Raag Desh’, in which the guest composer was Siddharth Pandit, also featuring as guest composer here. They are joined by Anjjan Bhattacharya too, the second guest composer. Now, I barely remember any tracks from the previous installments of this franchise, showing how short their repeat value was. Let’s see whether the tracks in this instalment are any better.


Let’s get the songs by the two guest composers covered first — just my OCD, nothing else. 😂

Kesariya Jugni is another of the countless takes on the ‘Jugni’ folk song, but other than the tumbi nothing reminds me of the original, so I don’t think I’d classify it as a recreation! Anjjan Bhattacharya, who I always believed to be the melody master when Meet Bros. Anjjan was still a trio, takes the opposite path here; he relies more on the sound to propel his song forth. The aforementioned tumbi gives the song its required Punjabi energy, while other techno sounds help give it a universal connect. Dhols and all are present, but don’t contribute much. My favourite touch was the “Aao ji aao sarkar…” portion sung by Amit Gupta. The Nooran Sisters (whose surprisingly it is the first song of the year ONLY! 😕) carry the entire song on the shoulders; whenever it starts getting remotely repetitive, the Noorans keep it interesting and listen-worthy. Kumaar’s lyrics are something that would fit into a ‘Tanu Weds Manu 3’ as well, but Anjjan’s music it what makes it suit the vibe of this franchise.

The other guest composer Siddharth Pandit creates the Baba Theme, which succeeds as a gangster song, but fails to keep the listener attentive. Revant Shergill’s rendition is weak, the composition is closer to a recitation of sorts, and the arrangements are way too repetitive (more than Sanju’s ‘Baba Bolta Hai’ too!) for my liking. Revant Shergill even pens the lyrics, which again, are unsatisfactory. This song is something to skip if you get bored of repetitive sounds in songs.

Rana Mazumder starts his portion of the album with a recreation (more like a cover) of Lag Ja Gale from ‘Woh Kaun Thi’. After Lata Mangeshkar, the only singer who’s gotten even close to her rendition was Shreya Ghoshal, who I’ve been fortunate enough to hear singing this live! Rana Mazumder though, ropes in Jonita Gandhi, who had me floored by her rendition! Obviously not close to Lata di’s rendition, but from the current crop of singers, it’s only Gandhi who can get even this close to Shreya’s rendition too. What’s an added bonus, is that Mazumder keeps the arrangements really, really wonderful. The calmness and emotion of the original song has been kept intact, since Rana has used a beautiful orchestra, wonderful twinkling sounds, a mellifluous flute, chimes, and even a well-placed, iconic sitar. Of course, Madan Mohan ji‘s song is immortal, but I’m pleasantly surprised with this presentation of it. It is definitely a recreation I’d want to reach a million views in a day, but sadly, that kind of ‘recognition’ is in some other song’s fortune. 😦

As we veer over to Rana Mazumder’s original part of the album, we see a shift in the music from the modern, gangster-y music which the two guest composers had used in their songs, to a noticeably Pancham-ish vibe in Mazumder’s original songs. Three of the next five songs have that distinct Pancham touch, the first one being Andheron Mein Rishtey, which features in two versions, both with the same jazzy arrangement, which was a staple arrangement for detective/gangster films in the 70s or so. The trumpets are fascinating, as is the bass, and the composition is aptly sinister, as are Sandeep Nath’s lyrics. The Male Version by Arijit Singh falls below the Female Version by Mandakini Bora (newcomer?) though; Arijit’s sleepy voice just didn’t suit the theme of the song. Mandakini renders the song sensuously; such songs are best in female voices, I feel. That said though, her voice isn’t something I’d listen to the song solely for.

More along the Panchamda vibe is Dil Ka Parinda, which is crooned by the composer along with Usha Uthup. It starts with a pacy Latin rhythm with amazing Spanish guitars and Caribbean-style percussions. The first time around, the song sounds a bit pretentious, but it grows on you with the number of times you listen to it; Usha Uthup as usual is at her best in such songs; she leaves no stone unturned in making it her own song. Even composer Rana Mazumder tries to pull off a Pancham, but he doesn’t do it as well as he had done under Vishal-Shekhar’s music direction in ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ (The Dirty Picture). Even if you don’t like retro songs, you should listen to this song if only for the guitars and percussions. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics, yet again, are fun, though nothing exciting.

Rana departs from the Pancham vibe gradually, but Aye Huzoor still has some distinct Pancham touches in the arrangements. Rana uses sitar wonderfully again, and a very commendable use of muffled tabla sounds makes it a very delightful composition. The ‘Hey Shona’ (Ta Ra Rum Pum) duo Shaan and Sunidhi Chauhan render the song beautifully; Sunidhi is singing in the same voice which she had sung in, in that song as well. Though the composition is listener-friendly, I don’t think I see myself revisiting it many times in the future. Kausar Munir has written some cliché Bollywood romance lyrics, but they’re not dated as in irritating at all.

The last song, Davaa Bhi Woh, is drastically different from the previous songs of the album. It is entirely reminiscent of the Ismail Darbar – Sanjay Leela Bhansali combinations in ‘Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam’ and ‘Devdas’, especially the latter. Right from the female chorus in the beginning, to the overbearing tablas and kathak sounds, like the ghungroos and bols, this song is splendid. The new singer Saberi Bhattacharya is wonderful as well, and reminds me of Alka Yagnik in places. Rana Mazumder spins a beautiful melody based on Raag Khamaaj (I believe; don’t quote me) and reminds you of other songs like ‘Jagaave Saari Raina’ (Dedh Ishqiya). The conclusion to the song is magnificent as it should be, and I wonder what it is doing here in this soundtrack. 🙄


Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 turns out to be the most memorable album of the franchise; I can see myself humming most of these tunes in the near future at least! Rana Mazumder manages to churn out entertainingly varied songs even for a gangster flick!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 4 + 8.5 + 6 + 6.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 9 = 55

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Davaa Bhi Woh > Lag Ja Gale > Aye Huzoor > Dil Ka Parinda > Andheron Mein Rishtey (Female) = Kesariya Jugni > Andheron Mein Rishtey (Male) > Baba Theme

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 29 (from previous albums) + 01 = 30

Which is your favourite song from Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAI MIXED BAG!! (ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil & Ranjan Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Yogesh, Amir Khusro, Pratibha Tiku Sharma & Pradip Sharma Khusro
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 9th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 18th May 2018

Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain is a Bollywood romantic drama starring Sanjay Mishra, Pankaj Tripathi, Anshuman Jha, Brijendra Kala, Ekavali Khanna & Shivani Raghuvanshi, directed by Harish Vyas and produced by Manav Malhotra. The film has music by three new composers – Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil and Ranjan Sharma. Let’s see how these three newcomers fare!


This album is the perfect example of equitable distribution of songs in a multicomposer album, each composing entity gets two songs each!
Praveen Kunwar starts the album with a pleasant romantic song Meri Aankhein, where we get to hear the composer singing a nice pahaadi type folksy portion before the real song starts. The melody is a typical Shaan melody — simple, heard-before, but pleasant. Shaan always gets such songs right, and he does so here too. Vaishali Made, who we hear in Bollywood only now, after her big break (which wasn’t her debut) in “Bajirao Mastani”, sounds great too, but not irreplaceable. The song has pleasant arrangements consisting of guitars and strings mostly, and all in all, is a fun listen.
Whatever composing talent Praveen seemed to have with his first song, seems to have evaporated with his second song Piya Mosey Rooth Gaye, a painfully slow and sombre 90s-ish sad song, in which singer Satyendra Tripathi tries (and succeeds about halfway) to sound as much as he can, like Udit Narayan. The composition bores you, but can’t even put you to sleep; it’s just boring. The flute in the arrangements too, can’t do anything to rouse the listener from the depression that the composition and the vocals forces him into. I doubt this would be well received even if it were released in the 90s.
The next composer, Ranjan Sharma, composes two songs on traditional lyrics, the first and the better one being Ab Maan Jao Saawariya, which is almost (almost) suitable for a period film, but not the Bhansali and Gowariker kind, more like the ones for which Ismail Darbar would compose (without Bhansali backing him, of course). That being said, though, the classical composition is soulful, and the tablas and sarangi do a wonderful job together, to make it sound better. Mahua Chakroborty’s vocals are pitch perfect, for such a song. The song will unfortunately bore those who haven’t warmed up to Hindustani classical music.
Ranjan’s second song More Banni Ki Mehendi, starts off as an entertaining wedding song, but in just one minute it turns into a painfully stretched and slow bidaai song with the usual Bollywood BIDAAI tropes — a slow duff rhythm, paayal sounds, and a composition that tries to tear your heart open. The singer Archana Thammala has a great voice though, I have to admit. Ranjan Sharma’s auto tuned voice could’ve been avoided!
The reason I write about composers Oni-Adil at the end, is because their songs are the only two songs that are both by the same composers and are both good.
Tera Hua Main Jab Se is a really pleasant romantic song, just like ‘Meri Aankhein’, but any day, Mohit Chauhan is a better pick than Shaan for such a song. This song is probably the freshest song of the album, because the arrangements just make you feel so good. The hookline too, is catchy, and it almost sounds like the kind of song Pritam would compose for a non-Bhatt film around 2008-2010. The guitars really sound amazing here.
The composer duo surprises me when they do a complete 180 degree turn, for their next song Aaj Rang Hai, a traditional number with lyrics by Amir Khusro. It is my favourite song from the album, because it is a really well done Qawwali, and the composers have splendidly done the arrangements — harmonium, tablas, chimtas, dholaks. The composition is spiritual and perfect for such a song! The vocals by Jatinder Pal Singh, and others, is amazing. If you don’t like Qawwalis, you should still hear this one; kmaybe you’d start appreciating the musical prowess it takes to create them!


This is one of those albums where certain songs are amazingly beautiful, while others are just bad and boring. Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain ‘mixed bag!’ 😂

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 5 + 6.5 + 4 + 8.5 + 8 = 39

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hua Main Jab Se > Aaj Rang Hai > Meri Aankhein > Ab Maan Jao Saawariya > Piya Mose Rooth Gaye > More Banne Ki Mehendi

Which is your favourite song from Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

HOPE TO HEAR MORE OF RUPERT’S MUSIC!! (HOPE AUR HUM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rupert Fernandes
♪ Lyrics by: Saurabh Dikshit
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st May 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

Hope Aur Hum Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Hope Aur Hum is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Naseeruddin Shah and Sonali Kulkarni, directed by Sudip Bandyopadhyay and produced by PVR Pictures and Thumbnail Pictures. The music for this film is given by newcomer Rupert Fernandes, so let’s wait no longer to see how he scores in his debut!


Rupert Fernandes opens his debut album in Bollywood with a groovy title song. Hope Aur Hum works because of its catchy arrangements, composition, and the hook which repeats so many times — almost like a commercial jingle. The composer provides nice padding though, around the hookline. I must say that the song gets repetitive towards the second half, because of the mainly whispery nature it has been sung in. Speaking of which, Bhoomi Trivedi and Suraj Jagan are the perfect choices for such type of vocals. The arrangements consist of engaging rock guitars, drums, and the nice banjo-ish plucked instrument. Saurabh Dikshit’s lyrics suit the children’s movie theme, but that doesn’t mean adults won’t appreciate them too!
Sonu Nigam’s Acche Bacche Rote Nahin is another song where the hookline is repeated a time too many, but the song still hits the nail on its head, because of the way it handles the emotional quotient. Rupert doesn’t make it too melodramatic, and it works just well enough to be an engaging listen throughout! Sonu Nigam’s different variations of the hookline is one reason why the repetition of the line doesn’t matter too much! When you have a performer like Nigam, you can have only one line and repeat it all throughout your song; as if it’ll matter, because he’ll do the rest! Saurabh Dikshit’s limited lyrics still manage to do well in the ‘sad song’ genre, where lyricists usually just beat around the bush, rinse and repeat. I loved Rupert’s addition of engaging guitar riffs throughout the song; it’s the only instrument in the song, and oh, how wonderful it sounds!
Shaan’s Aye Zindagi happens to be the star song of the soundtrack; Dikshit’s verse “Aye zindagi, khelenge phir kabhi, aaj mood nahin hai!” hooks you instantly, and thankfully, Rupert accompanies Dikshit with a just as cute composition to go with the words. Again, guitars feature as the prominent (maybe only) instrument in the song, and the vocalist is depended upon to do the rest — Shaan manages that quite easily! It is a pleasure to hear him in a song he deserves, after a long time! And I commend the composer for roping him in, when the ideal choice would be Arijit Singh or Mohit Chauhan! Anyway, it is another case where the best song is saved for the last! 🙂


A short and sweet soundtrack; I can only hope we get to hear more of Fernandes’ music in the future, because this one will probably, sadly, go unnoticed!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 7.5 + 8 = 22.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aye Zindagi > Acche Bacche Rote Nahin > Hope Aur Hum

 

Which is your favourite song from Hope Aur Hum? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

NOT QUITE BLACK SHEEP ANYMORE!! (BAA BAAA BLACK SHEEP – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan), Jaidev Kumar, Sajid-Wajid & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Sunil Sirvaiya, Rajesh Manthan & Jalees Sherwani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd March 2018

Baa Baaa Black Sheep Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baa Baaa Black Sheep is a Bollywood comedy film starring Maniesh Paul, Manjari Fadnnis, Anupam Kher, Kay Kay Menon Annu Kapoor in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishwaas Pandya and has music by Superbia, which is Gourov-Roshin-Shaan’s band. They have given one full album in the past (‘Coffee with D’) which was terrible, but this one seems to be slightly better! Let’s see!


Superbia’s stint in music composition continues after the cringeworthy album to “Coffee With D” (2017). This time, they start the album off with much more promise, recreating a sort of medley that T-Series calls ‘Mixtape’. They recreate Abhijit Vaghani’s recreation/amalgamation of Galla Goriyaan/Aaja Soniye, the two original songs respectively by Harbhajan Mann (a pop single) and Sajid-Wajid (from ‘Mujhse Shaadi Karogi’). I must say, the song works to whatever effect the makers wanted. It is an enjoyable Punjabi club number rendered surprisingly enjoyably by Mika Singh, and Kanika’s voice is as always, addictive. I just wish ‘Aaja Soniye’ had more parts in the song than it does. Harbhajan Mann’s composition to ‘Galla Goriyaan’ does the rest of the work, making this an enjoyable dance song.
Heer, the romantic song, is also surprisingly well sung by Mika Singh, who has sung such numbers in the past, and should sing them more often. Not that it is a soulful number, but still softer than the songs he’s known to sing, like the previous song on the album. Mahalakshmi Iyer is heard after a long, long time, and is pleasant to the ears. The only fault if any, in this song, is the irritating repetition of the hookline, which almost demolishes whatever fun we were having listening to it. The arrangements are nice, with amazing guitar work, but not never-heard-before. Lyrics are functional.
The song that tries to be its own “Ek Do Teen” (Tezaab/Baaghi 2), except this time, counting age instead of days, is Angelina, a typical 2000s type of song sung very 2000s-ishly by Sonu Nigam. The effect of the Latino touch in songs has been wearing off these days, and it just makes them sound dated. The vocal onomatopoeia is just cringeworthy, too.
Then there are two songs that up the quirk quotient, except one does it the right way and the other, the bad way. Baa Baaa Black Sheep is as cringeworthy as a title song can get, sounding contrived at every note. Shaan sings like he had no choice, and the female backing vocalist just sounds weirdly happy singing whatever lines she’s given. The lyrics are just bad, so there’s no point of talking about them.
Ram Leela, on the other hand, had me in splits when I heard it for the first time, especially because of the hilarious “dhikichyaoun” after every hookline. 😂 This one has to be heard to understand, and all I can tell you is that it’s kind of a spoof of the Ramayana with enjoyably funny lyrics.


Superbia’s second full album turns out to be balanced between bad and good, but largely just an album that you’ll forget after listening to it, if at all you stumble upon it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 5 + 4 + 6 = 31

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Galla Goriyaan / Aaja Soniye > Heer > Ram Leela > Angelina > Baa Baaa Black Sheep

 

Which is your favourite song from Baa Baaa Black Sheep? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Baa Baaa Black Sheep) = 17

SUPERBIA’S TASTELESS COFFEE! (COFFEE WITH D – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 2nd January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th January 2017

Coffee With D Album Cover

Coffee With D Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Coffee With D is an upcoming Bollywood satirical film directed by Vishal Mishra, and produced by Vinod Ramani. The film marks the debut of popular comedian Sunil Grover, who we all know as “Guthhi” from the defunct “Comedy Nights with Kapil”, and now as Dr. Mashoor Gulati on “The Kapil Sharma Show”. Supporting sarcastic includes Zakir Hussain, Dipannita Sharma and Anjana Sukhani. The film is the story of a news reporter, Arnab Ghosh (which Sunil Grover claims, isn’t based on Arnab Goswami, and when any actor or actress or director says this, we know that it definitely is based on that person) who is going through a rough phase in his career, until he gets the golden opportunity to get back his TRP ratings — an interview with an underworld don name ‘D’ and we all can only guess who that ‘D’ is. The music for the movie has been composed by Superbia, which (don’t get too excited; it’s no foreign band or anything) is just a fancy term for Gourov-Roshin when Shaan joins them. So Gourov-Roshin-Shaan are behind the music of this, whose discography boasts of films like ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ (one song) and ‘Great Grand Masti’ (One song). Now they get the full album for his movie, and have composed four songs for it. Gourov-Roshin as a duo had worked previously for four albums, with three songs in ‘Force 2’, one in ‘Tum Bin 2’, one in ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ and two in ‘Kaabil’. One song from ‘Kaabil’ and the song from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ was listenable; others were strictly atrocious. So now, let’s see if the addition of Shaan does any special magic to this duo. Not that their songs in ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ or ‘Great Grand Masti’ were excellent either!


1. Coffee With D

Singer ~ Anu Malik

(No line from the song is worth writing here!)

The first song takes the form of a kind of theme song for whatever show Sunil Grover’s is the anchor of in the movie. The composition is so bland and boring and dull and icky, that it just suits as a theme song to some talk show. Superbia do a good job in stringing together the most weird-sounding notes, trying to give it a gangster-rap touch, but it is the mukhda itself that sets you off. The song could’ve worked just as well with only the mukhda , and then it would actually sound like a theme song. What’s more, the way they’ve repeated the hookline for so many times, that it actually sounds like some stupid talk show on Doordarshan is going to follow. The two unnecessary antaras take away any interest the listener might’ve gained from the mukhda. The composers don’t add anything enticing as far as he arrangements go. A stale and outdated sound looms over the whole song like thunderclouds. The digital beats sound veryyyyy outdated. Anu Malik is at his obnoxious best with his vocals, though he doesn’t sound like he did in his earlier songs — it is a different kind of obnoxious. Also, Sameer’s lyrics are horrible. Not at all meant for repeat listening!

Rating: 1/5

 

2. Ali Ali

Singer ~ Shabab Sabri

“Hoke mayoos koi, maangne waala na gaya,
Hey tune itna diya, mangaton se sambhala na gaya”

The next song is a Qawwali, one which closely sticks to all the trademark Qawwali clichés used in Bollywood. It starts off with a long and almost neverending ad-lib, which, but for the good lyrics, just sounds sleep-inducing. After that ad-lib, though, the trio hopelessly resort to the very typical Qawwali beats (which they could’ve brought some variations into!) that we heard already in ‘Bhar Do Jholi Meri’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The exact same beats, along with quite tedious arrangements of harmonium and tablas, which usually sound great, if done perfectly or innovatively (Like the Qawwalis ‘Allah Hu Allah’s and ‘Meherbaan’ from ‘Sarbjit’), but sound tedious here. Shabab Sabri sounds different in this song; usually, his voice sounds low-pitched and booming (I still love his rendition of Sajid-Wajid’s awesome rock Qawwali ‘Jadoo Tone Waaliyan’ from ‘Daawat-e-Ishq’) but here, he sounds quite high-pitched. To his credit, he has rendered he composition with the right amount of perfection required. Just that the composition and arrangements are too tedious to support him. Towards the end, the composers go for that quintessential rise in tempo that any Qawwali is incomplete without. Something that could’ve been interesting, though, they make it a repetitive portion, and it leaves the song ending in such a way that listener feels incomplete. Sameer’s lyrics might be something that might be working for the song, but it’s not that lyrics are what a listener first pays attention to, to decide whether he will like the song or not! A tedious Qawwali! Still waiting for a great Bollywood Qawwali! My favourite folk genre is betraying me these days! 😦

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Nation Wants To Know

(Named as ‘Teri Duniya Di’ on Saavn)

Singer ~ Shaan

“Hazaaron ke taadaad mein karodo ke ghotale,
Paisa power se jab chaahe jisse jo karwaale,
Har ghante breaking news,
At least a million views,
Arey ainvayi faltu issues banaaye asli mudde taale!”

The next song follows with the mediocrity, but only in terms of composition. The trio’s composition once again falls into their category of below average tunes. There isn’t anything catchy in the composition, and the only part that’s supposed to be catchy (‘Teri duniya di bajj gayi band…‘) seems dated. The rest is like a rap song, so it has almost no tune. The arrangements are another miserable fail from the trio’s sound, mixing various club beats with Punjabi dhols and seeing whether they work. Well, they didn’t. It just seems like a song from 2006. At least they haven’t overdone the club beats and it isn’t a bombardment to the ears, like Gourov-Roshin did in ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil). The song has been sung by one of the trio’s members, Shaan. And he has sung the song in a very different way than his usual style. At least he got rid of that sugary-sweet image he had created in so many songs of his that released nowadays. I’m still waiting for a good song from Shaan since ‘Chaar Kadam’ (Pk), but he seems more interested in judging ‘The Voice’. 😦 Anyway, he sounds mediocre here. The lyrics by Sameer Anjaan might be the best part of the song, which, in all my boredom, I forgot to tell you, is a satirical song. He sticks to the satirical theme and gives some nice lines to ponder on. Especially the second stanza, which I’ve written up in the ‘Lyrics Showcase’ portion, was quite good. Another mediocre song, but saved by the lyrics.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Tumhari Mohabbat

Singers ~ Aakanksha Sharma & Shaan

“Mujhe din lagega, bhale raat ho, tumhari mohabbat agar saath ho.”

So not even this movie escapes from the ‘Romantic Song Bug’ that has infected all the filmmakers these days. The next song is a romantic song, and I wouldn’t say it is too impressive either, but it is quite pleasant. Again, the composition sounds very old-school, in neither a negative nor positive way. It really didn’t matter much to me this time, probably because it was the first pleasant and non-repetitive thing to hit my ears in this album. The composition is like a 90s Jatin-Lalit song, and does quite well in catching your attention too. Sajid-Wajid (‘Saanson Ne’ from ‘Dabangg 2’) and Himesh Reshammiya (‘Dhoom Dhaam’ from ‘Action Jackson’) occasionally give such old 90s-styled songs, and now Superbia follows their lead. The hookline pleases you, if not impresses and fascinates. You think, ‘At least it is better than everything else in the album!’ The mukhda doesn’t quite intrigue, but the antara is relatively better, as far as the composition goes. The arrangements are cool too, with a heard-before but pleasant tabla rhythm gracing the hookline. Harmonica is a prominent instrument used throughout the song, and that’s another main attraction of the song. The vocals are good, and Aakanksha gets to sing the mukhda and one antara, while Shaan sings only the last antara, so it doesn’t quite seem like a duet. Shaan is back to his mushy self, but tries not to be extra-mushy, while Aakanksha tries hard to imitate Monali Thakur. And even succeeds in places. Sameer’s lyrics belong to the 90s like everything else does, but like you did everything else, you overlook that too, just because. A ‘chalta hai‘ type of song.

Rating: 3/5


Coffee With D turns out to be even worse than expected. Not even one song adheres to today’s music sensibilities, and none of the songs proves for a pleasant respite. The songs may be situational, but I don’t think he movie too will excel too much with such dated tunes. An album that is best forgotten (if you hear it, that is)! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 1 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tumhari Mohabbat > Nation Wants To Know > Ali Ali > Coffee With D

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes This Year: 03 (from previous albums) + 00 = 03

 

Which is your favourite song from Coffee With D? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NEITHER GREAT, NOR GRAND, BUT DEFINITELY FULL OF MASTI!! (GREAT GRAND MASTI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjeev-Darshan, Sharib-Toshi & Superbia (Shaan-Gourov-Roshin)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan, Manoj Yadav & Kumaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 7th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th July 2016

Great Grand Masti

Great Grand Masti

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Great Grand Masti is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Aftab Shivdasani and Urvashi Rautela in lead roles. The film has been directed by Indra Kumar, and produced by Sameer Nair, Aman Gill, Ashok Thakeria, Sri Adhikari Brothers and Anand Pandit. The film is the third of its type to release this year, and all I know is that both of those, namely ‘Mastizaade’ and ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’, fell flat on their noses, and I expect this one to do so, as well, so all I’m concerned about is the music. The music of ‘Mastizaade’ was a one-hit wonder, with ‘Rom Rom Romantic’ by Amaal Mallik being the only song I loved out of four other songs by Meet Bros Anjjan and Anand Raaj Anand. In ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’ too, only one song — ‘Jawaani Le Doobi’, was really addictive, out of the four, all by Sajid-Wajid. Here, we have three entities — firstly, the thrice-in-a-blue-moon (please understand what that means) composers Sanjeev-Darshan, sons of Shravan Rathod of Nadeem-Shravan. They had composed the title track for ‘Grand Masti’ and now get two songs out of four in the sequel. Next up is the consistently disappointing (at least this year) duo, Sharib-Toshi, with one song, and last up is the band Superbia, with its members being singer Shaan, and Gourov Dasgupta and Roshin Balu. They too, get one song, and so the album is very conveniently made up of songs composed by two duos and a trio. What we have to see, is exactly how enjoyable the songs actually are. (because those of ‘Grand Masti’ weren’t at all!)


1. Teri Kamar Ko
Singers ~ Sanjeev Rathod, Darshan Rathod & Kanika Kapoor, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

An ode to the “Mastiiiiiii” from Anand Raaj Anand’s title track of the first ‘Masti’ movie, begins the album to the third instalment of the franchise. Not before long, the title of this movie comes and the peppy song takes off. Sanjeev-Darshan, who had composed a very dull and uninteresting title song fro ‘Grand Masti’, actually make up for their mistake there, with this song. This is the ideal song you want in a comedy movie — peppy, enjoyable, addictive and hummable. The duo have proved themselves in the 90s and it is commendable how they’ve evolved and are composing contemporary music, till date. Here, they do get in a bit of the templatised late 2000s sound of Bollywood, but everything is done very craftily. By craftily, I don’t mean it is a musical gem or something, but it is quite catchy, as it should be! The hook is infectious and energetic. It makes you groove along to it. The duo has composed a just as infectious tune, with three parts repeating, which are 1) the “Teri Kamar Ko” hook, 2) Kanika’s “darliiing” part, and 3) the 90s bhangra piece that goes like “oh baby teri look kamaal lagti hai…” . All three parts repeat throughout the song and mutually complement each other, to result in quite an appealing composition, overall. There is not even one word above the three parts I have mentioned, and that is kind of weird for a Bollywood song. So the mukhda is the antara and vice versa. Sanjeev-Darshan’s energetic singing too, gives the song half of its catchiness. Kanika sounds good, but not as unique as she does in other songs. It is Sanjeev-Darshan, who steal the spotlight. Arrangements are good as well. That groovy beat is present throughout the song, which is unforgettable. Brass has been used generously and it sounds great. The Punjabi part I spoke about has a great Dhol rhythm to it. Kumaar’s lyrics are enjoyable too. Especially true female part, is hilarious. Indifferent to the boys’ pleas, the clever girlfriends want a party, a ride in the car, a margarita, a diamond AND a meeting with his parents, before, in Kumaar’s words, “Jo bhi chaahe karle”! Surprisingly VERY catchy, and something that will play everywhere for a while! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Resham Ka Rumaal
Singers ~ Toshi Sabri & Soniya Sharma, Original Song by ~ Ila Arun, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Sharib-Toshi are back after an unsuccessful stint in the first half of this year, with bad or just below average songs from ‘1920 London’, ‘Veerappan’ & ‘Housefull 3’. After composing for two ‘third instalments’ — those of ‘1920’ and ‘Housefull’, they are back in the third instalment for ‘Masti’, and this time, they remix a traditional folk song by Ila Arun, ‘Resham Ka Rumaal’, with, of course, many modern club beats and whatnot. The song actually starts off with a funky groove, but when the actual composition starts, you can’t help but daydream and get bored. The composition is really dull, and also a desperate mix of their very own ‘Emotional Fool’ (Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania) and ‘Pyaar Ki’ (Housefull 3). It is just the typical Sharib-Toshi composition for dance songs. {They have typical compositions in dance as well as romance!! :\ } The hookline is taken as it is from Ila Arun’s song, and I don’t actually like the composition of that either, so this was a nightmare, especially with the masculine voice of the female voice! That brings us to the vocals. Toshi sounds dull and bland, and as feminine as ever. The female singer sounds more masculine than him. Both sound bad, in short. She has included unnecessary nuances in order to sound cool, especially in the hookline, adding the “ha” sound everywhere she can, to make it sound kind of like this — “Rehesham kaha ruhumaahal galehe pehe dahalke tu aajana, o dude mere main, main dillihi kaha surma lagahake arree, khadi hun ca-lub kehe darwahajje pehe.” It is so irritating! I was as irritated while hearing it, as you were while reading that! And then there’s a rap that sounds stupid. The arrangements are not interesting at all, with club beats trying to elevate the song’s quality, but reducing it in the bargain. Manoj Yadav changes the hookline to make it sound more modern and ‘cool’, like changing “dildar” to “dude”, and “kab Se khadi hun darwaje pe” in the original to “khadi hun ca-lub [club] Ke darwaaje pe.” Disgusting. And then another disgusting line goes “Where are you, where are you, mujhe taiyaar karke”, to which the female singer answers with the hookline of the song in that annoying voice and pronunciation. Sharib-Yoshi and Manoj Yadav are back with another bad song! Skip!

 

3. I Wanna Tera Ishq
Singers ~ Shivranjani Singh & Shivangi Bhayana, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This song starts off VERRRRYYY addictively. The percussion that starts off the song really helps in attracting the listener’s attention. And the rattles after that just increase his/her interest. Sanjeev-Darshan have cone up with another catchy and haunting tune, which grabs you, but not as great as the title song. Nevertheless, it is quite groovy! The hookline is something that irritates you the first time, but gets better and better with each listen. The antara is something that has gotten stuck in my mind. The mukhda, too, attracts the listener and makes sure he doesn’t leave halfway. The arrangements are another great aspect of the song, with catchy and addictive beats, Arabic arrangements like the percussion and the rattle, which reminds me of a snake rattle for some reason. 😀 A wonderful saxophone interlude fills the gap between two stanzas, and electronic tabla beats sound great. The two lead singers really sing the song the way it is supposed to, with a sensuous tone, to make it more addictive. I can’t differentiate between the two, but both sound good (irritating at first, but again, better each time) and also remind one of Neha Kakkar. It is the lyrics where the song lacks out, as was expected. The hookline makes no sense. 😛 “I wanna tera ishq” means “I want to your love” which is nonsensical. But again, the vocals and composition saves Kumaar! Another catchy song from Sanjeev-Darshan! #5StarHotelSong!! {I haven’t had tomatoes thrown at me for a long time!! Bring it on!!}

 

4. Lipstick Laga Ke
Singers ~ Payal Dev & Shaan, Music by ~ Superbia, Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjjan

The last song on the album goes into the calmest mode of the album, more like Indipop of 2000s, with Superbia (a trio comprising Shaan, Gourov Dasgupta & Roshin Balu) behind the composition and arrangements. The trio composes a decent song, which could’ve easily topped the charts, but in the time period I mentioned — the 2000s. In this decade, too, it is sounding good, but just that. The song is a like Punjabi pop number, with a slow-paced tune arranged on an overdose of tumbi, making it sound like a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor, and a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor is like ice cream without ice cream! 😦 😂😂😂 Nevertheless, the trio have made a nice instrumentation for themselves in the song, with a great guitar riff, and nice shehnais throughout. It is just the tumbi that sounds unnecessarily overdone. The “oh saiyyan ve” is crazily infectious, even in its slow pace! Payal Dev sounds good here, and at least she doesn’t sound irritating (like in “Veerappan”), but her voice sounds pretty addictive. And Shaan sings in a different avatar after a loooooonnnngggg time. His goody-goody songs are done I hope, and he features in an outright baddy-baddy song here, and sounds great rapping in Punjabi! A pleasant surprise for his peers. At least he didn’t add his too-sugary voice here, and spoil the song! Sameer’s lyrics are ATROCIOUS though. They’re too ridiculous to be talked about, but here are some highlights: “Lipstick lagake tenu loot liya ve / akhiyaan milake heart attack diya ve.” Excuse me, what’s “Myocardial infarction” then?? :\ I’m pretty sure Sameer learnt Biology with the lyricists of ‘Taang Uthake’, who are of the opinion that all our body parts have legs! A good composition, but a bit predictable and “on-and-off” type grooviness.


I never expected Great Grand Masti to have good songs. At the most, I was expecting one great song and the rest time pass. Yes, I know all are time pass songs, but for me, two of them stood out, and those are the two composed by the most senior composers, Sanjeev-Darshan. I know they’re ridiculous and I usually thrash such songs, but why thrash them when the movie needs such ridiculous songs. On one hand, we can have ridiculous songs with bad compositions (‘Housefull 3’) and on the other, they can have really addictive tunes (like these two). Even Superbia comes up with a functional composition, and partially gains my interest, but it is only Sharib-Toshi who disappoint. Again. And again. And again… All in all, it is an album that is neither great, nor grand, but full of ‘Masti’ for sure!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Kamar Ko > I Wanna Tera Ishq > Lipstick Laga Ke > Resham Ka Rumaal

 

Which is your favourite song from Great Grand Masti? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂