NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

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RATHER ‘DEAD’Y!! (DADDY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Olefonken & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Danish Sabri, Prashant Ingole & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 8th September 2017

Daddy Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Daddy is an upcoming biographical crime film, starring Arjun Rampal, Aishwarya Rajesh, Anand Ingle and Nishikant Kamat. The film is directed by Ashim Ahluwalia, and produced by Arjun Rampal and Rutvij Patel. The film documents the life of gangster-turned-politician Arun Gawli. The film has music by Sajid-Wajid and a Norwegian DJ named Olenfonken, and I would expect something good from a movie about a gangster’s life. Let’s see how close to my expectations the composers deliver!


1. Eid Mubarak

Singers ~ Shabab Sabri & Tanvir Hussain, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

Sajid-Wajid are usually great at Qawwali, and here they present a Qawaali as the first song. Well, the composition is the traditional Qawwali, and so it isn’t hooking right away, but if you’re the Qawwali lover, you would love it. As always, for a Sajid-Wajid song, they give it booming arrangements, making it worth listening to as a Qawwali. Harmonium, tablas, dholaks make the arrangements very rich and beautiful. As for the vocals, Shabab and Sa Re Ga Ma Pa 2016 contestant Tanvir Hussain (who’s exceptional with those aalaaps), handle them well. Lyrics are suitable too. A trademark Sajid-Wajid Qawwali.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Zindagi Meri Dance Dance

Singers ~ Alisha Chinai & Vijay Benedict, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Olefonken, Lyrics by ~ Anjaan

Now I know I’m breaking my own rules, but this song is so bad it calls for a long review. 😅 Get ready. So the song starts with a nice, retro beat (the beat from Bappi Lahiri’s old song “Zindagi Meri Dance Dance” from “Dance Dance”, the song which this song is a “remake” of). After that an emcee announces that we, the audience are now going to be taken to the moon, and asks us to look at a rocket, in which the whole audience will apparently fit, without any food supply, water supply or anything. Then he erases all our doubts and tells us that a particular Mehbooba and her Mehboob are going to climb out of this rocket, and dance, in the “pyaar ki masti“, on the moon. Then we get to hear the Mehbooba, who says “Hi Darling, I want to daaaaance with you. Daaaaance. Daaaance of love. Daaaaance on the moon.” It’s so cringeworthy you feel like stopping the song then and there, but you continue for the sake of it. Later we learn that the boy’s life is “Dense” (“Zindagi Meri Dense Dense“). Well of course bro, life is a dense jungle, you need to bear with it. Luckily for us, the girl pronounces “Dance” well enough. All throughout the song, a good composition is spoiled by various stupid interjections by the characters, and it is so irritating. Midway, the Mehboob decides he has the money and brains enough to take his Mehbooba to Venus. Now if I were him I would die before going to Venus, because I would anyway die on Venus. Someone please tell him he’s gonna die on Venus. His Mehbooba, stupid as she is, complies, and gets all happy about going to Venus, and even counts down! And then the stupid backing chorus sings “Venus! We Are Venus!” I don’t know if they know they’re speaking incorrect English or whether they think they are Venus. The Mehboob and Mehbooba further go on to romance on Venus! She says “Dekhe Jo Tu Aise Mujhe, Mere Kadam Dagmagayein!” Well, I bet that’s because of the poisonous gases, lady. But she doesn’t get the point, and keeps romancing him. Later she gets bored of Venus (Or maybe an alien is after them) so the lady very casually points out, “Darling, Chalo Kisi Aur Duniya Mein Chalo” (Let’s go to another world.) And the smart Mehboob immediately says “Mars.” Ugh, idiot!! Thankfully they don’t romance on Mars, and the makers stop the song there, instead of going till Pluto. Still, the song ends at a staggering six and a half minutes! 😛 Olefonken has basically remixed the old song, but nobody will like it anyway. The only thing this is good for, is a hearty laugh.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

3. Aala Re Aala Ganesha

Singers ~ Wajid & Ganesh Chandanshive, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

Where the first song was a Qawwali, the last song is a Ganesha song. And very badly composed too. Such a dark composition doesn’t suit a Ganpati song at all. It’s a typical Sajid-Wajid bad composition with no appeal at all. Those percussions are the same percussions they use everywhere, the dhol taashas, but that’s actually the best part of the song. The vocals are terrible, Wajid doing it himself. He is accompanied by Ganesh Chandanshive (‘Deewani Mastani’ fame) who disappoints as well. Lyrics are just so cringeworthy, like “Shambhu Cha Baal Kon?” (Who is Shankar’s son?). And then the chorus answers ‘Ganesha’. Another bad Ganesha song to release in the season, after the one from ‘Sniff’.

Rating: 1.5/5


Daddy is such a bad album, it is unbelievable. Two composers who used to be on the A-list of Bollywood composers once upon a time, now making this kind of music, is really sad. The guest “song” by Norwegian DJ Olefonken too, is dumb. Rather than “Daddy”, it should be called “Dead-y”!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 6

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Eid Mubarak > Zindagi Meri Dance Dance= Aala Re Aala Ganesha

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 29 (from previous albums) + 01 = 30

 

Which is your favourite song from Daddy? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOTHING ROYAL ABOUT THE ALBUM!! (BAADSHAAHO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Ankit Tiwari, Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, A1 Melody Master – Fana, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Sahir Ludhianvi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 1st September 2017

Baadshaho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baadshaho is an upcoming crime action thriller, starring Ajay Devgn, Emraan Hashmi, Vidyut Jammwal, Ileana D’Cruz, Esha Gupta and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film is directed by Milan Luthria, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Milan Luthria. The film follows the story of a gold robbery from a train in the 1970s. The music album is yet another of those albums produced by T-Series wherein a load of people have been hired to remake songs. Here too, we have three remakes, two by Tanishk Bagchi, and one by Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café, who remake Saint Kabir’s songs. Ankit Tiwari has done the last song, and it is an original song. Let’s see just how un-royal this album is.


1. Mere Rashke Qamar / Mere Rashke Qamar (Female Version) / Mere Rashke Qamar (Remix)

Singers ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan / Tulsi Kumar / Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Additional Vocals by ~ Shabab Sabri & Altamash Faridi, Original Composition by ~ Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ A1 Melody Master – Fana & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, Remix by ~ DJ Chetas

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s Qawwali that has suddenly gotten a popularity spurt, had to be remade in a Bollywood film, and it happens to be this one. It appears in three versions. Tanishk ropes in Rahat, which is an apt decision, but nevertheless, the song is a letdown. Rahat sings in a very painfully high-pitched voice, and Tanishk gives it a very modern and digital based arrangement, making the song lose its soul. And those backing vocalists are just a pain to the ears. Tulsi Kumar’s version is surprisingly less high-pitched and hence less harsh to the ears. But the backing vocalists ruin it again. DJ Chetas’ remix is abominable. The lyrics have been modified to make it more Bollywoodish, but it gets more boring and tedious. The most tedious and loud romantic song ever!

Rating: 2/5 for Rahat Version, 2.5/5 for Tulsi Version, 1/5 for Remix

 

2. Piya More

Singers ~ Neeti Mohan & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s only song in the album is an item song, which features Emraan Hashmi with Sunny Leone. The composer has used the composition of his old song ‘Nasha Sar Pe Chadke Bole’ (Dee Saturday Night), and made it, and that had a very nice 50s-ish sound in the hookline. However, legal issues followed, and he changed the hook tune, making it sound so distorted, it is disgusting. So now I don’t like the hook tune, and the rest of the song was anyway a typical item song tune. Neeti’s vocals are awesome, but Mika (a double track of his vocals, God save us) sounds horrendous. The arrangements are nice, and the sarangi interlude is fun. Lyrics are bad. Could’ve been much better!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Socha Hai / Socha Hai (2nd Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan / Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sahir Ludhianvi, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Again, this song was a remake of ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ (Deewaar), until they changed it recently, and now it seems like they’ve tried to erase any trace of the old song. I don’t know why. Now it sounds so forced, I don’t know why they would interfere with art that way. The tune seems tweaked and stretched everywhere, to try to take it out of the ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ mould. The funniest part is that now, there’s no mention of ‘Socha Hai’ in the song, which was there before. The vocals are good, but for Neeti’s portion, it sounds like somebody has a cloth tied around her mouth, which made her voice muffled. That sounds bad! Tanishk’s new antaras are the best parts of the song. Previously they had parts of the old song there too, but sadly those are gone too. Oh and the two versions are just one that is edited out of the other — why couldn’t they just keep it one version?? I don’t know what’s going on, but this song got a horrible makeover.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Short Version, 2.5/5 for Long Version

 

4. Hoshiyar Rehna

Singer ~ Neeraj Arya, Music & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café

Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe remakes traditional folk songs by Kabirdas. Here they present us with a very staid and clichéd and very preachy folk number that tries to tug at your heart, but is too weak. The song proceeds very monotonously, and the dialogues thrown in increase its heaviness. The arrangements are good with the Rajasthani touch, but again, some variations in terms of arrangements would’ve been welcome! Even Neeraj’s vocals are quite bland. Very straightforward and preachy, boring song.

Rating: 2.5/5


Baadshaho Is the typical below average multicomposer, full of remakes fare. It has four songs, out of which three are remakes, and then it has three versions of the remade songs. The only original song too, sounds like a distorted 50s song. There’s nothing Royal about this album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2.5 + 1 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 44.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: You Decide!

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 26 (from previous albums) + 03 = 29

 

Which is your favourite song from Baadshaho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NO ‘IRADA’ TO HEAR IT AGAIN! (IRADA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Neeraj Shridhar
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Times Music / Junglee Music
♪ Music Released On: 1st February 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th February 2017

Irada Album Cover

Irada Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Irada is a Bollywood thriller film, starring Naseeruddin Shah, Arshad Warsi, Sharad Kelkar, Sagarika Ghatge and Divya Dutta. The film is directed by Aparnaa Singh, and produced by Falguni Patel and Prince Soni. The movie is an eco-thriller about a mysterious bomb-blast at a factory, and the repercussions that follow. The movie having released already, and I being as lazy and late as I can to write the review for some reason, I should just hurry and get on with it. So the music has been composed by someone who we have been hearing behind the mic for years, (and also somebody who hasn’t sung a “good” song for quite a long time) Neeraj Shridhar. The singer-turned-composer isn’t composing something for the first time in his life; I believe he debuted with one song in Akshay Kumar’s ‘8×10 Tasveer’. Neeraj has composed four songs for the thriller film, and hopefully they bring the thriller touch to the film very nicely. Also expecting him to have sung a song. That being said, let’s dive on into the soundtrack of ‘Irada’!


1. Mahi

Singers ~ Harshdeep Kaur & Shabab Sabri

“Birha mein tere, kamli hui main,
Japdi hoon mala, main tere naam ki…
Kehnde ne saare, pagli hui main,
Abb na khabar mujhe subah Shaam ki!”

The first track on the album starts off the album very romantically, with a charismatic romantic song, high on Rajasthani folk elements and a very scinitllating tune. The composition by Neeraj Shridhar really took me by surprise. But then again, he coming from a pop background, such a composition could be expected from him also, as pop is a genre where you are free from the bindings of the script and whatnot. The song starts off with a wonderful folksy introductory couplet, sung by an uncredited backing vocalist, and she sounds great trying to emulate Rajasthan’s folk vocalists. As soon as the song starts, and right away starts with the hookline, you can’t help but be reminded of Anu Malik’s ‘Hamein Jab Se Mohabbat Ho Gayi Hai’ (Border; 1997), and coincidentally, that song too had a heavy use of the word “Maahi”. 😀 Here, Neeraj has beautifully made a hookline from that word, but it also sounds quite ordinary. One can’t help but keep waiting for something path breaking to arrive, but it doesn’t. Both the antaras have a nice tune too, a mélange of high and low notes. There is a kind of conclusion to the song after the second antara ends, and one just feels that it was completely unnecessary. It stretches for almost one minute, in a Qawwali style, which could have instead taken place in one of the interludes. But it looks like since Shabab had hardly anything to do for the first four minutes of the song, one minute was allotted solely to him at the end. Neeraj’s arrangements are fascinating. Rajasthani folk instruments find their way into his song, the sarangi and other strings being the most prominent. The beats for the rest of the song are digital, and I also feel that could’ve been replaced by traditional dholak beats. And then during that one minute of Qawwali, Neeraj adds the necessary tablas and harmoniums. The flute that starts the song is just fascinating. Harshdeep Kaur renders the song with ease, but I can say that it is the first time I’ve heard her sound so dull and melancholic; she could’ve put in more expression instead of just singing the song! She always sounds so beautiful! Shabab, as I said has almost nothing to do except yell (yes, I do mean yell) “aaaja maaaahiii” behind whatever Harshdeep is singing. Sameer’s lyrics are clichéd to the core, as always. A middling start to the album. Good tune and arrangements, but boring execution.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Irada

Singer ~ Nikhil Uzgare

(Nothing to showcase; what a belch-like song)

The next song takes the form of a hard-hitting rock song which fails to impress except in the rock itself. Neeraj’s composition sounds very rash and all over the place. We know rock can sound very orderly if done well, but sadly, this one is not that. The mukhda seems detached from the hookline, which in turn seems a separate entity in itself. The lines don’t flow into one another as they should in any good song. The hookline sounds like a tune made by a debutant composer. (Well, technically Neeraj can be regarded as one, but he’s been around in Bollywood for so long so as to judge what works and what doesn’t!) The singer (debutant Nikhil Uzgare) belts out the hookline convincingly as a rock singer, but his voice lacks the connect that voices like Suraj Jagan and the like have. The arrangements are impressive, with the rock hitting the right notes. Rock guitars have been played impressively, as are the drums. Sameer’s lyrics are good, but get lost somewhere in the noisy singing and weird tune. Only the rock rocks, and that doesn’t help when the tune is bad!

Rating: 1.5/5

 

3. Chaand Rajai Odhe

Singer ~ Papon

“Chaand rajai odhe, gum jaaye chaandni,
Dastak dena hawa, chup rahe raagini,
Nindiya ki duniya mein khoyi rahe tu,
Akhiyon ke paalne mein, soyi rahe tu,
Main gaauun loriyaan, main gaaun loriyaan,
Main gaaun loriyaan, main gaaun loriyaan!”

Now we are treated with another dulcet melody, this time a male-sung song, which is a lullaby. The song immediately reminded me of ‘Masoom Sa’ (Madaari; 2016), another song from father to child. This time too, Neeraj gets it right as far as the composition is concerned. The composition has all that it needs to succeed as a lullaby, and especially the “Main gaaun loriyaan” hook is impressive. The antaras are also impressive, and the tune treads over the low octaves so wonderfully, that it gives a really fascinating touch to the low notes. The man rendering these notes is responsible too for that though. Papon, fresh from the success of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre; 2016) sings this song in his metallic voice so splendidly that it just touches your heart directly. His voice has the glint of magnetism that makes sure your audience falls asleep, but doesn’t, while you sing a lullaby (if you get what that means!) Arrangements are tranquil, with guitars racing ahead of everything else and making sure things are in right place. Strings help to infuse that orchestral quality into the song, while shakers sound marvellous, shaking subtly in the background. The piano notes that you can hear if you listen carefully, are BEAUTIFUL! The only wrong thing I can point out in this song is its duration; it gets quite testing to sit and hear an almost seven-minute-long lullaby! But that’s not a creative fault. Sameer’s lyrics are just marvellous here, suitable for a lullaby and very moving. A well-done lullaby, with a lilting touch.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Mitran De

Singers ~ Master Saleem, Kaur B & Earl Edgar

(Nothing to showcase here!)

The last song comes and you are sure that Neeraj has played ‘Alternate the Genres’ in this album. First a romantic song, then a loud rock song, then a lullaby, and finally, a loud Punjabi party song. This song literally follows the Punjabi alcohol party template to the tee. The mukhda starts the song off as frivolously as possible, but by the time the hookline arrives, you start getting used to the song. It sounds like those Punjabi songs everyone in Bollywood used to make during the 2007-2010 period. The antara actually has a good tune, by which I mean enjoyable. There are two antaras, one sung by Kaur B, and the other by Master Saleem. That brings us to the vocals. Three vocalists in a song that Neeraj himself could have very well sung himself seems quite preposterous. Okay, at least Master Saleem was a good choice. But Earl Edgar’s portions seem too forced to believe. His rap is believable, but the parts he tries singing sound bad! Kaur B gives us a good break from Neha Kakkar with her unique voice. Arrangements are typical club song arrangements, with heavy techno sounds and the Punjabi instruments pitching in to do all they can to help increase the loudness. The tumbi stands out here too, but then again, give me a song where it doesn’t. The dhols are very pompous, and contribute to the noise pollution. In all this, I feel the song hasn’t been recorded properly, as there’s a harshness to every singer’s voice. Sameer’s lyrics don’t go beyond the usual ‘Let’s drink till our liver breaks down’ stuff we hear everyday in Bollywood. (Am I overdoing it? Because nowadays we don’t hear that stuff everyday! Maybe that era has passed!! If so, I’m happy! :P) A Punjabi song that is enjoyable, but with every enjoyability in life, you get unwanted problems. 😉

Rating: 2.5/5


Irada turned out to be not as inspiring as its name. Neeraj Shridhar could’ve made a spectacular soundtrack! But sadly, the songs don’t live up to the mark. Two of the songs fare quite good, the other two are weak. Overall, the album isn’t one which you would be listening even one month down the line.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 1.5 + 4 + 2.5 = 11.5

Album Percentage: 62.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Chaand Rajai Odhe > Mahi > Mitran De > Irada

 

Remake Counter
No.of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 00 = 04

 

Which is your favourite song from Irada? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SUPERBIA’S TASTELESS COFFEE! (COFFEE WITH D – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 2nd January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th January 2017

Coffee With D Album Cover

Coffee With D Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Coffee With D is an upcoming Bollywood satirical film directed by Vishal Mishra, and produced by Vinod Ramani. The film marks the debut of popular comedian Sunil Grover, who we all know as “Guthhi” from the defunct “Comedy Nights with Kapil”, and now as Dr. Mashoor Gulati on “The Kapil Sharma Show”. Supporting sarcastic includes Zakir Hussain, Dipannita Sharma and Anjana Sukhani. The film is the story of a news reporter, Arnab Ghosh (which Sunil Grover claims, isn’t based on Arnab Goswami, and when any actor or actress or director says this, we know that it definitely is based on that person) who is going through a rough phase in his career, until he gets the golden opportunity to get back his TRP ratings — an interview with an underworld don name ‘D’ and we all can only guess who that ‘D’ is. The music for the movie has been composed by Superbia, which (don’t get too excited; it’s no foreign band or anything) is just a fancy term for Gourov-Roshin when Shaan joins them. So Gourov-Roshin-Shaan are behind the music of this, whose discography boasts of films like ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ (one song) and ‘Great Grand Masti’ (One song). Now they get the full album for his movie, and have composed four songs for it. Gourov-Roshin as a duo had worked previously for four albums, with three songs in ‘Force 2’, one in ‘Tum Bin 2’, one in ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ and two in ‘Kaabil’. One song from ‘Kaabil’ and the song from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ was listenable; others were strictly atrocious. So now, let’s see if the addition of Shaan does any special magic to this duo. Not that their songs in ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ or ‘Great Grand Masti’ were excellent either!


1. Coffee With D

Singer ~ Anu Malik

(No line from the song is worth writing here!)

The first song takes the form of a kind of theme song for whatever show Sunil Grover’s is the anchor of in the movie. The composition is so bland and boring and dull and icky, that it just suits as a theme song to some talk show. Superbia do a good job in stringing together the most weird-sounding notes, trying to give it a gangster-rap touch, but it is the mukhda itself that sets you off. The song could’ve worked just as well with only the mukhda , and then it would actually sound like a theme song. What’s more, the way they’ve repeated the hookline for so many times, that it actually sounds like some stupid talk show on Doordarshan is going to follow. The two unnecessary antaras take away any interest the listener might’ve gained from the mukhda. The composers don’t add anything enticing as far as he arrangements go. A stale and outdated sound looms over the whole song like thunderclouds. The digital beats sound veryyyyy outdated. Anu Malik is at his obnoxious best with his vocals, though he doesn’t sound like he did in his earlier songs — it is a different kind of obnoxious. Also, Sameer’s lyrics are horrible. Not at all meant for repeat listening!

Rating: 1/5

 

2. Ali Ali

Singer ~ Shabab Sabri

“Hoke mayoos koi, maangne waala na gaya,
Hey tune itna diya, mangaton se sambhala na gaya”

The next song is a Qawwali, one which closely sticks to all the trademark Qawwali clichés used in Bollywood. It starts off with a long and almost neverending ad-lib, which, but for the good lyrics, just sounds sleep-inducing. After that ad-lib, though, the trio hopelessly resort to the very typical Qawwali beats (which they could’ve brought some variations into!) that we heard already in ‘Bhar Do Jholi Meri’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The exact same beats, along with quite tedious arrangements of harmonium and tablas, which usually sound great, if done perfectly or innovatively (Like the Qawwalis ‘Allah Hu Allah’s and ‘Meherbaan’ from ‘Sarbjit’), but sound tedious here. Shabab Sabri sounds different in this song; usually, his voice sounds low-pitched and booming (I still love his rendition of Sajid-Wajid’s awesome rock Qawwali ‘Jadoo Tone Waaliyan’ from ‘Daawat-e-Ishq’) but here, he sounds quite high-pitched. To his credit, he has rendered he composition with the right amount of perfection required. Just that the composition and arrangements are too tedious to support him. Towards the end, the composers go for that quintessential rise in tempo that any Qawwali is incomplete without. Something that could’ve been interesting, though, they make it a repetitive portion, and it leaves the song ending in such a way that listener feels incomplete. Sameer’s lyrics might be something that might be working for the song, but it’s not that lyrics are what a listener first pays attention to, to decide whether he will like the song or not! A tedious Qawwali! Still waiting for a great Bollywood Qawwali! My favourite folk genre is betraying me these days! 😦

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Nation Wants To Know

(Named as ‘Teri Duniya Di’ on Saavn)

Singer ~ Shaan

“Hazaaron ke taadaad mein karodo ke ghotale,
Paisa power se jab chaahe jisse jo karwaale,
Har ghante breaking news,
At least a million views,
Arey ainvayi faltu issues banaaye asli mudde taale!”

The next song follows with the mediocrity, but only in terms of composition. The trio’s composition once again falls into their category of below average tunes. There isn’t anything catchy in the composition, and the only part that’s supposed to be catchy (‘Teri duniya di bajj gayi band…‘) seems dated. The rest is like a rap song, so it has almost no tune. The arrangements are another miserable fail from the trio’s sound, mixing various club beats with Punjabi dhols and seeing whether they work. Well, they didn’t. It just seems like a song from 2006. At least they haven’t overdone the club beats and it isn’t a bombardment to the ears, like Gourov-Roshin did in ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil). The song has been sung by one of the trio’s members, Shaan. And he has sung the song in a very different way than his usual style. At least he got rid of that sugary-sweet image he had created in so many songs of his that released nowadays. I’m still waiting for a good song from Shaan since ‘Chaar Kadam’ (Pk), but he seems more interested in judging ‘The Voice’. 😦 Anyway, he sounds mediocre here. The lyrics by Sameer Anjaan might be the best part of the song, which, in all my boredom, I forgot to tell you, is a satirical song. He sticks to the satirical theme and gives some nice lines to ponder on. Especially the second stanza, which I’ve written up in the ‘Lyrics Showcase’ portion, was quite good. Another mediocre song, but saved by the lyrics.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Tumhari Mohabbat

Singers ~ Aakanksha Sharma & Shaan

“Mujhe din lagega, bhale raat ho, tumhari mohabbat agar saath ho.”

So not even this movie escapes from the ‘Romantic Song Bug’ that has infected all the filmmakers these days. The next song is a romantic song, and I wouldn’t say it is too impressive either, but it is quite pleasant. Again, the composition sounds very old-school, in neither a negative nor positive way. It really didn’t matter much to me this time, probably because it was the first pleasant and non-repetitive thing to hit my ears in this album. The composition is like a 90s Jatin-Lalit song, and does quite well in catching your attention too. Sajid-Wajid (‘Saanson Ne’ from ‘Dabangg 2’) and Himesh Reshammiya (‘Dhoom Dhaam’ from ‘Action Jackson’) occasionally give such old 90s-styled songs, and now Superbia follows their lead. The hookline pleases you, if not impresses and fascinates. You think, ‘At least it is better than everything else in the album!’ The mukhda doesn’t quite intrigue, but the antara is relatively better, as far as the composition goes. The arrangements are cool too, with a heard-before but pleasant tabla rhythm gracing the hookline. Harmonica is a prominent instrument used throughout the song, and that’s another main attraction of the song. The vocals are good, and Aakanksha gets to sing the mukhda and one antara, while Shaan sings only the last antara, so it doesn’t quite seem like a duet. Shaan is back to his mushy self, but tries not to be extra-mushy, while Aakanksha tries hard to imitate Monali Thakur. And even succeeds in places. Sameer’s lyrics belong to the 90s like everything else does, but like you did everything else, you overlook that too, just because. A ‘chalta hai‘ type of song.

Rating: 3/5


Coffee With D turns out to be even worse than expected. Not even one song adheres to today’s music sensibilities, and none of the songs proves for a pleasant respite. The songs may be situational, but I don’t think he movie too will excel too much with such dated tunes. An album that is best forgotten (if you hear it, that is)! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 1 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tumhari Mohabbat > Nation Wants To Know > Ali Ali > Coffee With D

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes This Year: 03 (from previous albums) + 00 = 03

 

Which is your favourite song from Coffee With D? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DOESN’T DESERVE TO BE WELCOMED!! (WELCOME BACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Meet Bros. Anjjan, Anu Malik, Mika Singh, Music MG (Milind Gaba), Siddhant Madhav, Yo Yo Honey Singh & Abhishek Ray
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Manoj Muntashir, Shabbir Ahmed, Music MG (Milind Gaba), Arafat Mehmood, Nitin Raikwar, Deane Sequeira, Manvendra & Abhishek Ray
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th August 2015
♪ Movie Released On: 4th September 2015

Welcome Back Album Cover

Welcome Back Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Welcome Back is a Bollywood action comedy film, that stars an ensemble cast consisting of John Abraham, Shruti Haasan, Anil Kapoor, Nana Patekar, Paresh Rawal, Naseeruddin Shah, Dimple Kapadia, Shiney Ahuja and Ankita Shrivastava. The film is directed by Anees Bazmee, and produced by Firoz Nadiadwala. As even the newest born baby in the country must be knowing by now, owing to the delay my review has made in arriving, the film is a sequel to the 2007 superhit ‘Welcome’. The absence of Akshay Kumar was already a cause of negative buzz surrounding the film even before its release, and after release, it’s as if the film has been forgotten by most people. Anyways, the music has been given by a horde of music directors, which you can read up in the “Album Details” section, because I’m really too lazy to even copy-paste all that (mostly because of the GENIUS music composers that the list contains). It seems to be an album where T-Series has very little say in what songs to include and what to not, because it has turned out very BAD, frankly. So my review for it will be written with the same amount of interest that the composers have seemed to put into the making of the songs; be ready! 😀 Also look out for many lines where you can point out how irritated I was with the composers as I went through this unnecessarily loooooonnnnnggggg album!


1. Tutti Bole Wedding Di
Singers ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan & Shipra Goyal, Backing Vocals by ~ Ambresh, Ved, Ashish, Ruchir & Bipin, Music by ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

To open up this grand album, we have a wedding song that tries to be grander than it should. Larger-than-life arrangements coupled with a staid band-baaja tune is something that is doomed to fail. The Bollywood audience has already had enough of the wedding themes in the 90s and early 2000s itself, and another song along the same lines, without any hint of innovation or evolution is definitely not going to all of a sudden change the mind of the public. Meet Bros. Anjjan, releasing one of their pre-split songs, must’ve been too over-excited after getting a song in such a big-budget movie, that they lost their senses halfway through the process of making it. The stale pe-pe-pein template, a must in Bollywood wedding songs, makes an appearance in this song as well, and it couldn’t have got any more clichéd than this. I have to admit, the good recording and arrangements do give some reason to hear the song despite the boring composition. Meet Bros, making a smart move by not hiring Mika for the song, have also avoided another chance of making the song sound even more stereotypical. Their voices sound way better than Mika would have sounded! Shipra also sounds good in her parts, but again, could’ve added a bit more energy to hear voice. On the arrangements front, dholaks, tumbi, flutes, trumpets and all the other wedding instruments don’t shy away from making appearances at least once in the song. A guitar interlude before the second antara, is worth paying attention to, though! Kumaar’s Hinglish lyrics are neither catchy, nor do they generate any interest in the listener, which is normally the case with Hinglish lyrics. Towards the end, a tempo increase makes things livelier but not at all interesting, and it ends up sounding like a mess! Not an impressive start to the album by Meet Bros. Anjjan!! Arrangements are what makes it tolerable, or else you better just go hear some 90s wedding song — it would be more enjoyable!

 

2. 20-20
Singers ~ Anu Malik, Mamta Sharma & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ Anu Malik, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir & Shabbir Ahmed 

Anu Malik enters the soundtrack with the second track itself, as if trying to say, “Fear not, I’m here!” But then, does it even apply here? Earlier this year, he gave us a great soundtrack in ‘Dum Laga Ke Haisha’, composing songs that both catered to the audience as well as suited the theme of the movie. He had to compose in 90s style there, as the film was set in the 90s. But does that mean he should eternally compose as if it is always the 90s? Because apparently, he seems to be under the impression that what worked 20 years ago, will work even now, even though not required in the film. So, he churns out a song that seems to have been rotting in his music bank ever since he debuted! Right from the beginning, you instantly feel that you are in that era when stupid lyrics and a “catchy” tune would work no matter what. The arrangements make sure you feel that way. And what should I say about the composition? I’ve already said it sounds like a stale 90s item song, and that is it! Nothing more, nothing less. Add Mamta Dharma’s annoying vocals to it, and crude interruptions from Anu himself, and you can increase the cheapness value by infinity! :/ The only one who seems to shine as far as vocals go, is Shadab Faridi (that too, backing vocals!) And his is the only part I liked! About the lyrics, I would say that I never expected Manoj Muntashir to participate in such a song; Shabbir is at least imaginable! Watching a 20-20 cricket match a thousand times would be a more productive work than listening to this thing which has been unfortunately called a “song”! SKIPPPPP!

 

3. Welcome Back (Title Track)
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Geeta Jhala & Music MG (Milind Gaba), Music by ~ Mika Singh & Music MG (Milind Gaba), Lyrics by ~ Music MG (Milind Gaba)

Of course, the title track of ‘Welcome’ was one of the main attractions in the soundtrack and so, as is Bollywood’s regular convention for a sequel, a remake of the title track is mandatory, isn’t it? So here, Sajid-Wajid’s catchy title track is bestowed into the hands of Mika and Milind Gaba, to try and make it more attractive for today’s audience. If you ask me, well, the two have done their job well, and have to be given credit for it! And by ‘it’, I mean turning the song into a complete club song with club beats and the stereotypical club sound and spoiling it. And also ordering everybody to jump while listening to it, even though what they’ve done isn’t even enough to make anybody react in any way whatsoever. It’s pretty much how you sit in history class, expressionless. Mika’s part that goes “Lachke…” is so irritating, that you keep waiting for it to get over, and when it is over, Music MG kicks in with a super-annoying rap, which will not surprise you even though he says it very fast. Geeta Jhala’s voice is one of those thousands of female voices these days that are programmed to suit the club atmosphere, and we never get to know what they really sound like! The beats are totally techno beats and might offer some respite from the obnoxious lyrics and tune, but just some. Sajid-Wajid should hear this, and laugh at Bazmee. Only good for clubs and functions, where half the people don’t even care or know what song plays!

 

4. Meet Me Daily Baby
Singers ~ Siddhant Madhav & Pawni A Pandey, Backing Vocals ~ Hyasinth D’Souza, Music by ~ Siddhant Madhav, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

Till now, we have heard three songs of the album, all three by established and well-known people of the industry, Meet Bros Anjjan, Anu Malik and Mika Singh. None of them really impressed me as such. So when the next song happens to be by a newcomer, naturally my reaction would be something like “Woah! Wait a minute! You mean to say that you’re gonna make me hear a song by a newcomer, after three atrocious songs by non-debutants? How do you expect me to trust you there?!” So I start listening without many expectations. Imagine how surprised I must have been when the song started in a funky, groovy and catchy way! Trumpets and other brass instruments welcome us into the song, and in a really catchy and addictive way. Pawni, whose voice has matured to the fullest by now, starts singing some English lines which don’t really matter as far as what they mean is concerned. The actual song starts when Siddhant Madhav, the composer comes behind the mic and sings his lines in a voice resembling that of Neeraj Shridhar a lot. The composition has been done with care and time, and that’s why I guess it has at least some power to grasp you. Everything is fine until the hookline comes which sounds really cheap and amateur, what with the bad blend of English and Hindi. The lyrics just keep getting worse in the antaras, with phrases like “you know na tere bin main kitni adhoori”, “Within a second tooney Ki Dil Ki chori” and other mixes of Hindi and English we would never even think of using in day-to-day life. Arafat Mehmood seems like another Shabbir Ahmed in making. Siddhant’s arrangements are really engaging, with a slight Latino touch to them, thanks to the wonderful brass instruments, guitars and other techno elements working in favour of the same. As far as the singers are concerned, Siddhant sounds a bit old at places, but that’s the requirement of the film (watch the video — he’s singing for Anil Kapoor and Nana Patekar, so…. You get it!) Pawni sounds as cheap as cheap can get in some places, kind of overdoing the accent when she has to sing some English words. Both the singers put unnecessary extra stress on the word “Baby” everytime they sing it, and they say it so many times in the song, it sounds like an overdose of babies. And the way they say it, it sounds like “Bayybaa”. 😒 Overall, one of the better songs of the album, but sometimes overflowing with cheapness. Anyways, since it’s one if the better songs, I would say, don’t underestimate the power of a newcomer!

 

5. Time Lagaye Kaiko
Singers ~ John Abraham & Anmol Malik, Music by ~ Anu Malik, Lyrics by ~ Nitin Raikwar

Those guitars start the song, and I immediately think of Salman Khan’s ‘O O Jaane Jaana’ for some reason. I guess the guitars have been played in a similar way in that song too. 😂 Anyways, this song is the second song by Anu Malik on the soundtrack, and is another one of the decent ones on it. The guitars have a pretty soothing effect, and the composition is tolerable too. But only until the singers don’t kick in. Because when they do, you might get confused and ask, “These are singers?” Well, I’ll tell you. The male voice isn’t that of a singer. It’s an actor. John Abraham singing his first song. Hello John, just because Salman, Alia, Shraddha et al are singing songs in their movies, it doesn’t mean that it’s compulsory for you! He has sung the song, and just had his voice programmed to try to make it sound good, but it doesn’t even sound good. And Anmol, who’s supposed to be a singer, sounds utterly atrocious, trying to torture us with that deliberate nasal twang in her voice. Shruti Haasan should’ve sung it, for all there was, because she’s featuring in the video. At least she would’ve sounded better. Anu Malik has rescued the song from doom by adding interesting guitar arrangements, though, so as long as you hear it by your own will, it’s all fine. The beats aren’t really captivating, by they’re not bad either. One con about the song is its duration, which is well over five minutes, and that is pretty much unbearable for such a song. Nitin has penned lyrics as if an actual tapori is singing. He has added that Mumbaiya language to the words and messed up English, to put in that effect. Nothing great, but just perfect to suit the visuals and situation, I guess. The composition is good at places, but the listener would lose interest in the antaras. But for the extremely stretched length, and the atrociously bad vocals, this one is pretty good!

 

6. Nas Nas Mein
Singers ~ Shabab Sabri, Rani Hazarika & Meet Bros. Anjjan, Rap by ~ Deane Sequiera, Music by ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Meet Bros. Anjjan return for their second song, and it takes the form of a gangster party track. Who knew gangsters partied with sinister music and I-wanna-kill-you type music? :p The song starts with a tune played on a really high-pitched horn or something like that. Deane says her rap portions, which really sound like a witch is singing them, thanks to their sinister feel. Techno sounds accompany her, which might make you groove for some time initially, but gradually the whole setup gets awfully boring and it starts sounding too monotonous. Shabab tries his luck at the club genre, and gets it right here, too. He sounds really great in this type of song. The antara sounds better, because it is slightly slower and calmer, plus Shabab shows some of his classical finesse in the notes of the antara. Rani Hazarika gets her one line only in the antara, one line in each of the two antaras, and when she says it, it sounds so much like a man at first, that you can’t make out the difference between her voice and Shabab’s. Deane’s second rap portion in the second interlude is much better than the one she got in the prelude, and keeps listeemers listening at least till the second antara. Meet Bros. Anjjan’s composition is a tad bit too grim and dark, and it sounds really over-the-top at places, and it gets the listener thinking, “Hasn’t Bollywood gotten over the days when gangsters used to party in clubs like this?” Because such songs were pretty common once upon a time. It just sounds outdated in today’s era. Lyrics are good, and suit the composition, with just as much grimness as the tune. The evil feel could have been slightly milder! Wonderful vocals by Shabab are the only attraction here!

 

7. Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar
Singers ~ Mika Singh & Yo Yo Honey Singh, Music by ~ Mika Singh & Yo Yo Honey Singh, Lyrics ~ Traditional, Additional Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This song really has the capacity to keep you moving and grooving to the music for as long as it plays, for four minutes. Yes, it has the names of two of the people whose songs I rarely like, Mika and Yo Yo Honey Singh, but this time, I’ve got to admit, they’ve co-composed something really funky yet divine! And that’s another rendition of the classic traditional song, ‘Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar’. I know the composition can’t be credited to them wholly, but the arrangements they’ve done are spectacular! Funky club beats grace the entire composition, and the awesome bass effect enhance the sound even more. Mika always sounds really sweet and awesome when he sings this song, be it under Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s direction in D-Day, or this one that he designed with Yo Yo Honey Singh. If you remember, they had released this as a single two years ago, and it had become a rage, playing on TV and radio numerous times. But in this time, it seems to have been forcefully thrust in, just because of lack of a superhit song in the album! Yo Yo’s parts are really low-pitched, and one of my favourite parts in the whole song! It sounds so divine, the way he kind of raps-cum-chants the words he has to sing. The lyrics are mostly the same from the original song, with additional verses written by Kumaar, like what Yo Yo has to sing. Something that I find tough to digest — the best song in the album is a remake, and that too, by Mika and Yo Yo, and the only #5StarHotelSong!!!

 

8. Welcome Back (Theme)
Singer ~ Abhishek Ray, Rap by ~ Abhishek Ray, Music by ~ Abhishek Ray, Lyrics by ~ Manvendra

The last song on the soundtrack (finalllyyy! — that seemed like eons!) is an utterly atrocious trying-to-be-too-cool kind of track, which calls the Welcome Back Theme. It consists of Abhishek Ray singing.. Or belching out words that don’t make an ounce of sense together, and they just seem to have been placed in the song to make it sound cool. The arrangements are bad except for when the tablas play occasionally. Female vocals keep saying “Woahh-ho-hoaa” throughout the song. Manvendra (who’s DAT?) didn’t have much to write here, just the most idiotic lines that could ever cross his thoughts. What an UNINTERESTING ending to this almost neverending album!


Welcome Back is an album that is a disgrace to Bollywood music. Neither does it contain anything original and good (because the best thing in it is remade), nor does it contain anything someone would want to come back and here multiple times. All the song have pathetic lyrics, most have bad vocals, and some even have bad arrangements. Only one song is perfect in all departments, that too is a remake. The album to its prequel also still sounds fresher than this album itself! :\ That says a lot! It  is an album that doesn’t deserve any special welcome at all! It really needs a farewell, however, from our playlists!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar > Time Lagaye Kaiko > Tutti Bole Wedding Di > Meet Me Daily Baby > Nas Nas Mein > Welcome Back (Title Track) > 20-20 > Welcome Back (Theme)

 

Which is your favourite song from Welcome Back? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

 

KAANON KE PARDE PHATTE TAK SUNNA!! (DOLLY KI DOLI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid
♪ Lyrics by: Irfan Kamal, Danish Sabri & Kumaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 2nd January 2015
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd January 2015

Dolly Ki Doli Album Cover

Dolly Ki Doli Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dolly Ki Doli is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy film, directed by Abhishek Dogra, produced by Arbaaz Khan & Malaika Arora Khan, and starring Sonam Kapoor, Rajkummar Rao, Pulkit Samrat & Varun Sharma. The film is like, literally the female version of “Ladies v/s Ricky Bahl”, because it’s about a girl who cons boys here. As always in an Arbaaz Khan production, the music has been given by Sajid-Wajid, who have opened up the year with a blast in the form of their album, “Tevar” and impressed us last year as well with their albums. This time, something crazy was expected from them, judging by the look of the film. So here’s my review of Sajid-Wajid’s album, ‘Dolly Ki Doli’.


1. Phatte Tak Nachna
Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

A Punjabi Wedding song is necessary in the rom-coms of today, so of course, this album starts with a very typpppical Punjabi wedding song, composed not very uniquely by Sajid-Wajid. The strange thing is that, inspire of the heard-before-ness, the song works very effectively, and Sajid-Wajid manage to come up with a hummable tune, very ear-friendly and one that is quite fun to groove to. Arrangements by Sajid-Wajid, however do disappoint here, because we are so attuned to them giving over-the-top arrangements, which burst through our headphones and instantly grab our attention. Alas, nothing of the sort here. Those electronic matkas / tablas (whatever it is supposed to be) do engage us towards the end though. Techno sounds also engage us in the interludes. Danish has come up with silly Hinglish lyrics that don’t impress much, but what do you expect from a con-girl faking a wedding? I certainly don’t expect flowery lyrics and philosophical lines! 😂 So lyrics are right at their place. The main attraction of the song, however, is Sunidhi and her awesome vocals, which have the ability to take any ordinary song to a different level. Her energy is matchless, and she knows when to use it and how. Under Sajid-Wajid’s direction, though, she always shines, is what I’ve noticed every time. Sp hit the floor and PHATTE TAK NAACHO! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Fashion Khatam Mujhpe
Singers ~ Mamta Sharma, Wajid, Backup Vocals ~ Shabab Sabri, Lyrics by ~ Irfan Kamal

Sajid-Wajid had started the year with a good album, ‘Tevar’. However, it wasn’t perfect, and it had a flaw called ‘Madamiyan’ in it, sung by Manta Sharma and Mika. In their next album itself, in the same month, they dare to give us another utterly ridiculous item song in the form of ‘Fashion Khatam Mujhpe’. This time, I guess Mika refused to sing and so Wajid himself got to do the honours. Anyways, what do we have to do with all that! Let’s get to the review. The composition is a very, very annoying Haryanvi-type one, with equally Haryanvi accented lyrics and diction by the lead singers. Mamta never fails to do a “great” job in singing these songs. (I hope you saw the double-quotes there) Wajod doesn’t provide any relief either, and Shabab, being the backing vocalist that he is, decides to stay in the shadows (of Mamta and Wajid’s irritating voices in this song). As for the arrangements, they are so great (notice that I haven’t out any double-quotes) that it is a real pity they were wasted on this song. :/  Irfan Kamal is another person whose name we’ll have to write down in the “Absurd Lyricists” list, whose only member is Shabbir Ahmed. 😂 As for appeal, I won’t say anything, as these songs very rapidly spread in this country and are also (unfortunately) liked by people! So no comments on that topic. Repetitive and now dull, stuff from the Sajid-Wajid-Mamta trio! Worth only one listen for the arrangements!

 

3. Babaji Ka Thullu
Singer ~ Wajid, Rap by ~ Danish Sabri, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

Sajid-Wajid get yet another interesting tagline to explore and experiment on, this time one that has already gained national awareness, thanks to Kapil Sharma and his talk show. So some of Kapil’s die-hard fans might be disappointed by the way Sajid-Wajid have built a song around the so-very-famous tagline. But some, like me (even I wasn’t that impressed at first, alright!) might be impressed by it and bring to notice the creativity in it. Okay, just kidding. The creativity does out very soon, right after we hear the rap which is of the same tune as the rap in ‘Shanivaar Raati’ from ‘Main Tera Hero’. After that, the antaras do entertain, but definitely do not stay with us for very long. The most catchy thing in the song is, without doubt, the hookline “tere pyaar mein mujhko kya mila-aa-aa-aa? Babaji ka Thullu” And I loved the way Wajid says “Thullu”! (He says “tullu” 😂 ) Actually, if there’s anything that stays with us for long after hearing the song, it has got to be Wajid’s awesome, ekdum bindass type rendition. He just sheds all his inhibitions and sings his heart out. The comic effect also wonderfully gets retained the way he sings it. Danish’s lyrics are way better here than ‘Phatte Tak Nachna’ and definitely should catch on with the youth in no time. The quirky arrangements are also very catchy. So, this song proves to be a just above average affair, with composition being lacklustre, but vocals, lyrics and arrangements awesome!

 

3. Dolly Ki Doli
Singer ~ Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Irfan Kamal 

The rock genre is one in which Sajid-Wajid excel each and every time they touch it, literally. The case is the same with this song. Sajid-Wajid rope in the guy getting more and more famous day by day, Divya Kumar, and with his rustic, earthy voice, he does full justice to this composition. The composition by the duo is one that suits the theme of the movie, i.e, it has a thrilling effect, and at the same time is very gripping and one that has you listening for the whole time. Yes, some similarities to Pritam’s “Buddhi Do Bhagwaan” from “Players” in the antara and also some similarity to the album’s own “Phatte Tak Nachna”. Arrangements by Sajid-Wajid are very lively and energetic. The rock guitars do impress a lot. The wedding instruments like shehnaai have also been effectively infused into the rock portions, creating an awesome fusion. The hookline is so different, unique but manages to be catchy. Irfan Kamal has managed to remove his name from the list of “Absurd Lyricists” instantly after he was listed there, by giving at least some decent lyrics in this song. Divya excels in the song, and really proves that he can sing just any type of song. A rocking title song with rocking vocals and a rocking tune and music! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Mere Naina Kafir Hogaye
Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Mild piano notes welcome us into the grand finale of the album, and it really is a Grand finale in the true sense. Rahat, who seems to be making a comeback every year now, makes a comeback into mainstream films this year directly after ‘Dedh Ishqiya’ last year. He shines as always. Sajid-Wajid, when united with Rahat, always do brilliantly. Their compositions for him are always a class apart, and so is his rendition for them. The arrangements in this particular song are very unusually soft, with soothing tablas and piano notes supporting Rahat, with the occasional harmonium. The interludes have been managed very beautifully. The first one has an awesome jazzy piano piece, whereas the second one surprises with a breathtaking harmonium solo. Sajid-Wajid’s love for naina finally comes out from the Salman Khan zone, and comes to Pulkit Samrat. Kumaar’s lyrics are very impressive. Again he proves that though he messes up sometimes in the dance tracks, he is definitely capable of delivering beautiful romantic lyrics for such songs too. All in all, a beautiful and classy love song sure to give you rahat! #5StarHotelSong!!


Dolly Ki Doli, though might not be as great as Sajid-Wajid’s other recent works, still manages to entertain for a while. With three songs impressing, the flaws in the other two (okay, one of the other two at least) can be ignored, and thus it can be said that this is an album which has everything for everyone. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean all of the songs clicked instantly. And many don’t stay with you for long, either. Only some manage to do so, but still, for the sake of the partyers out there, it is an enjoyable album. Sajid-Wajid have unfortunately dented their great hit album run by this album, but no worries as it was the script that called for it!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mere Naina Kafir Hogaye > Dolly Ki Doli > Phatte Tak Nachna > Babaji Ka Thullu > Fashion Khatam Mujhpe

 

Which is your favourite song from Dolly Ki Doli? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Hawaizaada, Chefs: Rochak Kohli, Mangesh Dhakde, Ayushmann Khurrana & Vishal Bhardwaj