CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Shakeel Azmi, Faaiz Anwar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Raool
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tum Bin 2 is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal and Ashim Gulati. The movie has been directed by director of the first instalment (Wow, that’s like an achievement for T-Series, to have the same director direct the sequel, even though the sequel is releasing like 15 years after the first movie!) Anubhav Sinha, who was trying his luck at other things like thrillers (‘Dus’, ‘Tathastu’ and ‘Cash’), sci-fi (‘Ra.One’) and also a social drama (‘Gulaab Gang’) and faring quite well at these genres too, until he came back to his first genre, romance, with this film! The movie has been produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Anubhav Sinha. The movie is another addition to the many quasi-sequels that T-Series has been churning out over the past three to four years, and, since T-Series is producing the film, we can expect a good soundtrack for this movie too! The music for the first film had been given by duo Nikhil-Vinay, and as was expected, a song ‘Koi Fariyaad’ has been remade for the sequel. The original soundtrack, as well as the remake, have been done by Ankit Tiwari, who gets his next solo album after exactly one year (Last was ‘Yaara Silly Silly’ last November). Hopefully, he gets out of his typicality, and seeing that he has given some quite different songs this year, I’m sure he’ll make that happen too. So, without further ado, let’s see how good this album is!


1. Teri Fariyad / Teri Fariyad (Extended Version)
Singers ~ Late Jagjit Singh & Rekha Bhardwaj (Both Versions), Original Composition by ~ Nikhil-Vinay, Music Recreated by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Original Lyrics by ~ Faaiz Anwar, New Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

The first song on the album, is a rework of the iconic ghazal from the first film, ‘Koi Fariyaad’. The name of the song and hence, its hookline has been changed from ‘Koi Fariyad’ to ‘Teri Fariyad’. Nikhil-Vinay, the composers of the original song, have done a marvelous job composing it, and I must say, Ankit Tiwari has recreated it beautifully. The song appears in two versions on the album, out of which the normal version is just a cropped part of the ten-and-a-half-minute long “Extended Version”, so I’ll just speak about the Extended Version. The song’s mukhda is an original composition by Ankit Tiwari, and it fits beautifully with the hookline that the composers of the original song had made. And whenever that happens in remakes, you know that the recreator has done half of his job right. The antaras too, start off with a new, utterly fabulous tune, which later connects seamlessly with the other half of the antara of the original song. The song has as many as five antaras, but (surprisingly) you don’t get bored at all throughout the song. Ankit’s arrangements are heavenly. The song starts off with the wonderful sound of the Kanoon, a Turkish/Arabic instrument that sounds oh-so-heavenly. As soon as the guitar tune (Guitars played by Rhythm Shaw) takes over though, the heavenliness just magnifies manifold. The sounds of the clarinet and saaz grace the song throughout, and help to male it sound more rustic and not too boring, either. The guitars play wonderful rhythms throughout the song, not to mention the beats taken care of by finger snapping sounds. And the interludes, are pure bliss! The clarinet seems to be the common instrument in all of them. The third interlude has the sweetest clarinet solo I’ve ever heard, which later simmers down to a very slow, and calmingly haunting musical piece led by the clarinet, and held up by finger snaps, and later joined into by a heavenly chorus. The fourth one has more going on in terms of guitars that help elevate the bliss that the clarinets provide. The kanoon once again makes an appearance in the fourth interlude, and touches your heart. The fifth interlude, which is what plays after the mukhda in the cut version of the song (the one they’ll probably use for radio promotions), is yet another beautifully arranged one, with the clarinet starting off yet again, only to give way to a calm and soothing church-like female chorus with bells jingling t keep the beat, and another wonderful kanoon piece. Strings throughout the song make it a ravishing listening experience. Vocals are top-notch, with Rekha Bhardwaj joining to add the newly composed female portions to the song, and executing them brilliantly, in her pleasantly high-pitched voice. The Great, Late Jagjit Singh’s portions, have been retained from the original song, and the cut-paste work has been done extremely diligently by Ankit Tiwari. I applaud him for choosing the right parts to retain from the old song and connecting with his composition. Also, I appreciate that for once, the makers have let the old voice be retained — they finally understood that nobody else can render such timeless classics. After ‘Hungama Ho Gaya’ (Queen) this is a pleasant surprise that the original singer’s voice has been retained (that too, by T-Series!) The lyrics are such that I can’t really say anything about them, can I? The new ones by Shakeel Azmi kind of suffer amidst the original poetry by Faaiz Anway, but it turns out to be a nice piece as a whole. Long song, long review! 😀 Beautiful recreation, and an apt start to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Ishq Mubarak
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra & Anas Ahmad, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s first completely original composition makes its way into the soundtrack after the mammoth of an opening song. The song is a wonderful Sufi love song, composed on the lines of the usual Ankit Tiwari template, but still striking a chord with listeners anyway. The composition starts off with a mukhda that screams Ankit Tiwari right away, because of all of its melancholia and sleepy notes. Thanks to the dreamy hookline that very gentlemanly comes to its rescue, though, the song just goes uphill from there onwards. The hookline has a very catchy Qawwali/Sufi feel to it, and you instantly develop a liking for it, in the bargain, forgiving everything that was wrong with the mukhda. The title of the song actually comes along in the interludes, where the backing vocalists nicely give it its own place in the song, without making it too obvious that this is the title of the song. The antaras, quite unlike the mukhda, are better behaved children of the composer, as they get all their notes right, aiming straight at your heart and mind, where they get stuck. The antara also has a very distinct Rahman-ish feel to it, which makes it sound all the more beautiful. The arrangements are elegant to the core. The shehnaai starts off the song with a very graceful sound, while the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) sound awesome trying to be sitars. The Dholaks and Tablas (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen, Musharaf Khan, Hafiz Khan, Manoj Bhati, Yusuf Khan) give the song a nice and grand feel to it, and they sound astounding in the dreamy hookline. The shehnaai continues to awe you in the second interlude, while an awesome sargam by the backing vocalists and harmonium embellish the first interlude. The harmonium (Firoz Khan) really becomes the essence of the song by the end of it. Vocals by Arijit Singh were frankly not required. The song ultimately sounds like an Ankit Tiwari song, and just to mitigate that feeling, if Ankit has employed Arijit to sing this one, it really didn’t help, as I keep imagining Ankit anyway when the song plays. Notwithstanding, Arijit carries the dreamy composition with finesse. The smile on his face can be heard through his voice in some places. And that is just so pleasant to hear every time!! Backing vocalists Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra and Anas Ahmad, do an extremely good job, and half of the beauty of the whole song, would be credited to them, since the’ve done their job so well!  Lyrics by Manoj Muntashir, I really enjoyed, maybe not so much because they’re nicely written and stimulate my brain to decipher their metaphors, but because they’re just cute and I simply liked them! HEAVENLY! Ankit scores with the very first original composition! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Dekh Lena
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

The next song of the album starts off with a very feel-good tune, slightly reminiscent of Ankit Tiwari’s song ‘Behki’ from his last solo album ‘Yaara Silly Silly’. The starting tune does refresh you, and gives a good indication of what’s to be found in the song. The composition is hummable and also breezy and feel-good, though I couldn’t help but notice how very ordinary it was. The mukhda starts off in a way that makes you think, “Okay, so it’s playing.. Let it play”, and you keep waiting for the point when the music will make you drop your jaw in awe, but that never comes, sadly. The hookline fares better in that it at least gives a tune that get stuck in your head, though again, very run-of-the-mill and 90s. The antara has been composed in a more matured way that fares better than both the mukhda and the hook, but more on why it doesn’t work later. The arrangements rely on the tabla and dholak beats (Sanjeev Sen) to accentuate the romance in it, which just ends up sounding sappy. The guitars are very ordinary, but functional, and surprisingly, three people (Rhythm Shaw, Pawan Rasailly and Roland Fernandes) are behind them. The flute (Naveen Kumar) too, fails to raise eyebrows, sadly. Vocals by Arijit and Tulsi male for a good romantic song, but they don’t really match. First of all, Ankit seems to have composed the entire song under some order by the makers of the film, that it has to sound like ‘Hum Mar Jayenge’ (Aashiqui 2), and so, those two singers seem to have been forcefully fitted into this song. I mean, the song is tailor-made for Arijit, but also sounds like a song recorded in the 90s from which Sonu Nigam was kicked out of, under the decree that “times have changed”. Arijit renders it nicely though. Tulsi comes in the antaras, with a horribly high-pitched rendition of the matured tune, destroying its essence completely. It sounds nice initially, but the feeling lessens gradually. By the time she reaches the end of her lines, the notes reach some pitch that nobody has ever heard yet! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics too, fail to satisfy, and struggle with their ordinariness. A song that is killed under the weight of the word ‘ORDINARY’. Also, too sugary for me!

 

4. Tum Bin
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Quite late into the album, comes the title track, sung by the composer himself. (Also the only song he sung in the whole album, so hats off to his self-control!) The song is not a remake of the title song of ‘Tum Bin’, which was already remade earlier this year by Jeet Gannguli, in ‘Sanam Re’. Rather, this one is an original composition by Ankit, and I must say, it is very grand. The only problem is in the complexity of the composition. Ankit seems to have gone overboard in making the song sound Rahman-ish, and adds many twists and turns in the composition, making it very hard to catch hold of, let alone find it catchy. The mukhda arrives after a prelude of piano and strings, that hooks you instantly. The composition of the mukhda is yet another sleepy one, but at least it has you wondering “what next?” The hookline too, fares well, with a pleasantly melancholic tune that doesn’t bore, except for when Ankit characteristically stretches the words out for like a gazillion seconds. The antaras are where the turmoil is created; an overtly convoluted tune doesn’t really help in a song that is already so melancholic. The tune did remind me of that awesome song ‘Do Pal’ from ‘Veer-Zaara’, however, and that provided a bit of respite through the tedious composition. Special mentiom to the point where the interludes meet the antaras though, such a wonderful transition, even though it is so abrupt. The magic of the song, completely lies in a different section of the song, which is, the arrangements. Ankit has provided a very ravishing strings orchestra (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra, conducted by Oleg Kondratenko) along with the laidback tune, and that makes the listening experience all the more exquisite. The strings reminded me of so many timeless Bollywood songs, like the one from ‘Veer-Zaara’ which I mentioned above. They help to propel the listener through the song, and it is the strings, that make for at least a couple of listens to the song before you dismiss it completely. Piano too, has been played very beautifully throughout the song. Songs like ‘Tere Liye’ (Sanam Re; Mithoon) and ‘Junooniyat Hai Yehi’ (Junooniyat; Meet Bros. Anjjan) which released earlier this year, created this whole melancholic-yet-grand experience better than this song here, because the composition was a bit more ear-friendly. This song reeks especially the former song I mentioned, because that one too, was sung by Ankit, though composed by Mithoon. The vocals by Ankit surprisingly didn’t get to my nerves here, and I sat patiently through the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are easy to just ignore, but even if you hear them, they are pleasant. A ravishing orchestral arrangement makes this song worth a couple of listens, but the complexity in its composition reduces its playlist lifetime drastically.

 

5. Masta
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Neeti Mohan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

After all that melancholia and romance, Ankit Tiwari decides to bring some fun and frolic into this album. And just as well as he does with the emotional and romantic part of the album, he does with the fun part. The composition is an upbeat, breezy one, that instantly hooks you to its lovely and lovable tune. The composer has left no stone unturned to bring every fun element into the song — right from a very catchy and upbeat tune, to an unmatchable rendition by Vishal Dadlani. The mukhda is a nice and fresh line, which, though abruptly, but nicely drives the listener into the fun song. The hookline blends in with the mukhda, and it is quite nice for a line that consists of only one word. The first antara treads on more mellifluous and subtle territory, with Neeti executing it brilliantly, with her bright and fresh voice that never seems to run out of magic. The second one, however, is yet another place where Vishal displays his energy. The  arrangements have a nice countryside feel to them, with the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) stealing the show with their breeziness, while the strings, with strong, fervent strokes, intensify the European-ness of the arrangements. The mandolin (Jatantilal Gosher) wonderfully supports the composition with its playful nature. The drums (programmed by Bitopan Phukan) provide the nice upbeat tempo to the song. During Neeti’s antara, acoustic guitars (Jatantilal Gosher) give a pleasant quality to the music. Interludes are splendid, with the second taking one by surprise at the wonderful Irish jig that it breaks into, complete with the claps and what I think is the keyboard playing in a strings sound. Towards the end, a wonderful bagpipe ends the song on a wonderful note, amidst Vishal’s energetic vocals. Which reminds me of Vishal’s flawless performance on this track. His indefatigable singing really takes me aback every single time. Neeti’s feathery voice leads the first antara beautifully. Her rendition here is another reminder to what a lovely singer she is, and how badly her voice is utilized sometimes.  (Ahem, song-that-cannot-be-named from ‘Housefull 3’) Manoj Muntashir has written a nice song about being carefree, and all-in-all the words are a pleasure to hear. A fun and peppy track that really changes my views about Ankit Tiwari’s potential. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Dil Nawaziyaan
Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song takes the freshness quotient of the album to an even higher level. The song is a nice love ballad that fuses two beautiful genres — classical and contemporary. Ankit’s tune is another one that instantly hooks you because of its fresh sound. The mukhda starts the song off on a fresh note, surrounded and propelled by wonderful guitars. The mukhda has two parts, one sung by each singer. When the hookline arrives, it sounds pleasant to the ears, but it isn’t till Payal’s Hindustani classical part comes and blows your mind away, that you start thinking that the song is really magical. That part is something that boosts the song to some uncharted territory, and it is from then that you start to listen more intently. Ankit has composed that part very soulfully, and Payal has rendered with the most classical quoted voice I can imagine. In short, everything falls into its own place PERFECTLY. After that, Arko comes with another surprise package. He comes and sings an English stanza, which is so beautiful because of its simplicity. The composition is beautiful as well. What’s weird is that, though the song is composed by Ankit, and Arko has but sung it, I kept feeling that the composition has some Arko touches to it. Kudos to Ankit, not only for bringing that Arko flavour into the song, but also roping him in to sing it. 🙂 The arrangements are pure bliss. While most of the song is propped on a quite typical acoustic guitar riff background, the guitars (Rhythm Shaw) bring the freshness to the song, and that’s half the reason the song sounds so magical. However, in the short classical respite we get that is led by Payal Dev, pure Lucknowi baithak styled tablas (Sanjeev Sen) take over and just make things more intriguing than the rest of the song. These tablas also come towards the end of the song to conclude it on a beautiful and refreshing note. The vocals are awesome. Both Arko & Payal sing their parts wonderfully, Payal sounding a lot better than all her other performances (except the very mystical one in ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Doongi’ from ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Arko sounding better than he does in most of his own songs too! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are nice and pleasant again, while Arko’s English ones are just as refreshing, and gelling well with the Hindi words. A great fusion becomes the center of attraction in this song, due to which the magic of everything else seems less, but it definitely is magical!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Jaeger Bomb
Singers ~ Harshi Mad, DJ Bravo & Ankit Tiwari, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Raool

It looks like Ankit isn’t yet finished with the fun and wildness, because, looking at the mere title of the next and last song on the album, I can tell that the mandatory club song is not yet over. The composition of this one clearly shows that Yo Yo Honey Singh was in rehab, Badshah had prior commitments to look to, and Millind Gaba was irritated that nobody liked his music, when this sing was in the making. In the absence of these three, Ankit had to muster up enough courage and stoop down to those standards in order to make such a composition. As is evident from the result, he succeeded in imitating them. 😀 This song seems like some tribute to them, with a slightly more monotonous beat. (I thought that nothing could get more monotonous than Yo Yo’s ‘Aao Raja’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’!!) Anyway, the song starts with yet another ruined nursery rhyme. This time, ‘Humpty Dumpty’ gets even more cracks, thanks to the song. The rhyme has been placed on a nice jazzy tempo, but sung by Harshi Mad in such a way that kids should strictly not listen to it! Or else, next time they picture Humpty Dumpty, he would be sunbathing at a beach and drinking lemonade…maybe! Jokes apart, Harshi Mad renders the rhyme spunkily, since it was supposed to be that way. After that, the EDM starts and there onwards, there is very less of a tune. Harshi gets some nice portions to sing, which are composed in a very jazzy way. And Ankit shoves in another one of his typical tunes, even into a club song! DJ Bravo’s portions are proof that they were inserted as a merepublicity stunt, because nothing he says can be made out.. Maybe because he’s singing in Hindi.. Or what is supposed to be Hindi. The arrangements are mostly EDM, with some nice jazzy portions in occasional places. Manoj’s Hindi lyrics are the usual Hindi cabaret style lyrics in Harshi’s parts, while the usual Ankit sobbiness in Ankit’s part. The English portions by Raool are barely audible, so I don’t know about them. The grand finale turns out to be the worst song on the album. A bad attempt at making a club song that will accommodate Ankit Tiwari’s sobs and yawns, DJ Bravo’s spunk, Harshi’s debutant-ness, and Humpty Dumpty!


Tum Bin 2 really turns out to be quite a good album. Ankit Tiwari gets a whole album to compose to his credit, not for the first time, but he still makes good use of the opportunity. The album is surprisingly full of variety, with songs ranging from a nice Sufi love song, to a melancholic and grandly orchestrated title track, to a club song that barely works, to a fun-filled peppy number and many more. The ones that will stand out and be lapped up by the masses, are definitely the first two tracks of the album. The remake has been done indescribably well, while ‘Ishq Mubarak’ will connect with the masses a lot. The rest seem like tracks with a more situational effect, but which will be liked by the niche music lovers anyhow, especially ‘Masta’ and ‘Dil Nawaziyaan’. And ‘Jaeger Bomb’ stands out in that it will find it difficult to find takers. Though not matching the greatness of Nikhil-Vinay’s soundtrack to the first film, Ankit does a nice job with this quasi-sequel, proving that the multicomposer theory is wrong, once again. An album that does good WITHOUT having multiple composers.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Fariyad (Extended Version) > Dil Nawaziyaan > Ishq Mubarak > Masta > Teri Fariyad > Tum Bin > Dekh Lena > Jaeger Bomb

 

Which is your favourite song from Tum Bin 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A PARINDA WITH SMALL WINGS FLIES HIGH!!! (ISHQ KE PARINDEY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vijay Verma, Rashid Khan & Sajjad Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Manthan, Irshad Khan, Sajjad Ali, Tanveer Ghazi & Shakir Khan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th April 2015
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th April 2015

Ishq Ke Parindey Album Cover

Ishq Ke Parindey Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Hungama CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Ishq Ke Parindey is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Rishi Verma and Priyanka Mehta as the male and female lead respectively. The film has been directed by Shakir Khan, and produced by Shyam Motion Pictures. The story revolves around two lovebirds (Ishq Ke Parindey… LOL! 😝😝), Sheen (a Pakistani girl played by Priyanka Mehta) and Faiz (an Indian boy played by Rishi Verma). Of course, the families don’t agree, what with all the Indo-Pak conflict going on for ages, and we all can predict what happens next. So, the plot is nothing extraordinary, nor does it showcase anything unique, but I would call it rather seemingly boring. However, what pushed me to review this album, as it always should be, was the music of the film. You must have been wondering why I’ve chosen to do such a small album, and I’ll tell you why. It’s because I was totally taken aback by the wonderful music of the first two song promos, that I decided to review this album, too. The music of this film has been given by Vijay Verma (who had composed a song in ‘Chakravyuh’ in 2012), Rashid Khan (‘Deewana Kar Raha Hai’ – Raaz 3, ‘Kabhi Aayine Pe’ – Hate Story 2) and Sajjad Ali [Chandwani] (‘Khwaabb’). Out of the three, only Rashid Khan is well-known to me, and so I was not expecting a lot from this album, UNTIL the first two song promos came and surprised me! Here are my thoughts about the album! 🙂


1. Ek Hatheli / Ek Hatheli (Sad) / Ek Hatheli (Remix)
Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Keka Ghoshal / Sonu Nigam / Vijay Verma & Supriya Pathak, Music by ~ Vijay Verma, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

This song excited me right from seeing Sonu Nigam’s name as one of the singers. I was expecting quite a lot from it right from then. And boy, were my expectations fulfilled! When you have a sweet, memorable composition, an awesome singer as Sonu Nigam, and cute lyrics, what can possibly go wrong? The result is a song, that has the whole capacity to attract masses and true music lovers. Though the tune is nothing fresh, and something of the type we have heard and loved many times in the past, it has that freshness which binds you to fall in love with it. The mukhda and both antaras, have been composed simply and very efficiently, ensuring itself a good, wide audience. What’s more, Sonu and Keka (who I don’t think is related to Shreya Ghoshal in any way) have brought in the sweetness and cuteness of the song. Both of them sing beautifully, and do justice to the sweet romantic composition. As for the arrangements by Vijay, they are a great amalgamation of traditional instruments like flute, and contemporary ones like guitars, thus promising a great listening experience for both Classical music lovers and Modern music lovers. Shakeel’s lyrics are also nothing new, yet good enough to bring smiles on our faces, and they suit the sweet composition, or vice versa, whatever he the case. Though the original version impresses, there is a “Sad Version” which doesn’t produce many sparks, only because of the fact that, the composition itself is predominantly a romantic, and sweet-sounding one, not suitable to become a sad one. Also, when they have made the sad version, they have just slowed the pace a bit and added strings in the backdrop, just for dramatic effect, which doesn’t do any effect whatsoever. Anyways, Sonu renders it beautifully. There is remix version, strangely sung by the composer and someone name Supriya Pathak (I’m sure it’s not the same Supriya Pathak you and I are thinking of. 😂) Beats are good, but nobody would go for this one, simply because everyone hates remixes now! All in all, only go for the original version, a beautiful, sweet and romantic melody sung and composed beautifully, and the original version is also a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dil Tod Ke
Singer ~ K.K., Music by ~ Vijay Verma, Lyrics by ~ Manthan

Now this second song, is the one which made me make this firm decision that I would, no matter what, review this small and unnoticed album. I was taken in by the magical tune and vocals of this song. So let’s see what exactly lured me into the trap of reviewing this album. (It’s a pretty good trap, though! 😀 ) First of all, the song starts with very attractive guitar riffs and some mellow notes played on the flute, which you can’t help but fall for! As soon as K.K., the very, very less-heard-nowadays singer starts singing the composition, you can’t suppress that waah! which comes out from your mouth, or if you don’t say it aloud, you will surely say it in your mind. Not for the vocals, no, but this time, for the composition. What A.R. Rahman or M.M. Kreem were known for in the 90s, Vijay Verma does it in this beauty of a composition. That haunting, but heart-winning composition is just irresistible. The repetition of each line in such a catchy and well-composed way, sounds magnificent. Resemblances in the antara to Rahman’s “Pyaar Ye Jaane Kaisa Hai’ from ‘Rangeela’, make the song sound more fun to hear, actually. 😀 The arrangements, again, are both classical and modern fused together in an efficient way, so as to enhance the composition as far ad possible, and it has definitely worked. It is showing in the results. The guitars, and tablas together sound awesome! That bagpipe-like instrument from ‘Teri Khushboo’ (Mr. X) makes an appearance here too! I really have to know which instrument that is!! The flute also makes wonderful entries occasionally. K.K. has sung the whole song with utterly amazing excellence. It doesn’t even seem that he has sung something after two months (latest was in ‘Roy’) but instead, it feels that he has been having continuous releases the whole time, seeing that his singing is just as soulful and beautiful. I just hope he gets way more songs than he has been getting nowadays. Manthan’s lyrics are typical romantic, sad lyrics, about someone breaking somebody’s heart, and the heart-broken guy telling her that he still needs her, hasn’t forgotten her, can’t sleep peacefully anymore, and other depressing things, which many have gotten pretty used to by now. But because of the lyrics being typical, I cannot neglect such a marvelous composition by Vijay Verma! Ati Uttam (Too good) rendition by K.K., and even better composition by Verma! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Rab Se Maangi / Rab Se Maangi (Remix)
Singers ~ Javed Ali & Palak Muchhal / Mohd. Irfan & Suvani Raaj, Music by ~ Rashid Khan, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Khan

The next song is yet another romantic song, this one composed by Rashid Khan. He chooses his regulars Javed Ali and Palak Muchhal to do the honours with the singing, and they do their part good. The tune, however, is too typical for Rashid Khan. We have heard this kind of stuff innumerable times in Rashid’s earlier songs like “Deewana Kar Raha Hai” (Raaz 3) and “Kabhi Aayine Pe Likha Tujhe” (Hate Story 2). It also somewhat resembles ‘Maheroo Maheroo’ (Super Nani) in its overall sound. Now for this album, too, he brings his regular, typical composition style, with the mukhda, followed by some ohhh-ohhh-ohhh humming. No doubt the composition is good, but very similar to the aforementioned two songs. In other words, I was sure Rashid Khan could do better than just sequels to his previous songs. Another drawback is the utterly atrocious voice programming done to Palak’s voice in the antaras. I think three-odd tracks of her voice have been placed on top of each other, making it take on a very ghostly sound. Even the lyrics are nothing fresh, just strictly suitable for the composition. And the length of the song (about 6½ minutes) given the genre of the song, could frankly have been way shorter. Anyways, some pros about this song are Javed’s mellifluous voice, which did keep me listening at least for the first time. Also, the arrangements by Rashid are good, too. His favourite, the flute, gets to follow him here too. Indian instruments like the santoor, make great surprising appearances. Surprising because most of the song is on a guitar loop, very typical of Rashid. The second interlude with very strange 90s-type percussion (like those 90s songs which had been shot in vast mountain ranges where the actor and actress dance weirdly, without any stress about the world around). The remix version is sung by Mohd. Irfan. Shocked to see his voice used in the remix. It could have been for a reprise. He does well, but his voice is drained out by the strong beats, which really do make you groove. His co-singer Suvani Raaj — not that good. She sounds like an amateur Sadhana Sargam prototype. And imagine this, the remix is even longer than the original! Who’ll spend their time on this remix, except a DJ or a die-hard Mohd. Irfan fan? Anyways, not very captivating, and the length is a setback because of the genre which doesn’t require such a long song. But definitely deserves at least one listen. The remix, however, can be skipped unless you’re a Mohd. Irfan fan (but you’ll still be disappointed after you hear it 😛 )

 

4. Ishq Ke Parindey, Pt. 1 / Ishq Ke Parindey, Pt. 2
Singer ~ Shadab Faridi (Both Parts), Music by ~ Sajjad Ali, Lyrics by ~ Shakir Khan / Tanveer Ghazi

The title track has been given to the third composer on the album, Sajjad Ali, and he does a great job in composing it. First of all it has been composed in two “parts”, both drastically different from each other, and coincidentally, both written by different people, but both sung by the same person i.e, Shadab Faridi. The first “part” starts with a patriotic dialogue about the unity of India & Pakistan, which is followed by a beautiful tune played on the Oud, which suits the theme of the dialogue that preceded it. The dholaks enter, playing a beautiful seven-beat rhythm called the Roopak taal. Half of the splendidness of the song is achieved because of the beautiful captivating rhythm. The flute and occasional strings can also be heard at places throughout the song. The composition is very beautiful and also enough to get stuck in your heads for long even after hearing it only once. Shadab has delivered the composition very awesomely. His deep voice suits the traditional, and heavy composition well. The female backing vocalists (uncredited) really add sweetness to the song. Shakir Khan, the director has written apt lyrics for the situation, full of the spirit of unity, and also very divine-sounding, thanks to the arrangements and composition. It talks about love having no boundaries. The Qawwali feeling given to the song is enough for it to be loved. The second interlude and second antara have been composed pretty creatively, and a kind of prayer to God. So the first “Part” works, now let’s move on to the second. It starts so dramatically, that you actually are surprised by what they’ve done to the beautiful song. The composition and lyrics are entirely different. As for the tune, it doesn’t work at all, being too dramatic. More like a great background piece to play in the climax of the film. At 1¼ minutes, it doesn’t really waste much of your time. The arrangements are also way too booming, not really of the same beauty as the former part. Lyrics are too less to talk about. Shadab, however, delivers with zest and emotion. Go for the first “part”, which is sure to steal your heart, in all aspects — composition, vocals, arrangements & lyrics. The first part is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Tumse Mil Ke
Singers ~ Javed Ali & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Vijay Verma, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

Javed and Palak return for another duet, this time helmed by Vijay Verma, who comes back into the album for his third and final song. This duet between Palak & Javed fares much, much better than their other duet by Rashid Khan. Right from the first line, it attracts you and its cuteness makes you keep listening. Javed once again traps you with his utterly sweet and dulcet voice. The composition is one that you would think is from some movie from the 2000s, but it is one of those, that still grasps you from start to end. The hookline itself is so catchy and wonderful, that it will instantly appeal to people of all ages. Palak doesn’t have much in the first half or so, except a line, but she gets an antara to sing later in the song. She sounds very good in this song, thanks to the composition, again. About the arrangements, they are also beautiful, with guitars, flutes and tablas helping to increase the likability of the song. Beautiful orchestration in the hookline makes it stand out even more than it already does. Lyrics by Shakeel are good in this song, with good use of many Urdu words, and imparting a sweet flavour to the song. At 3½ minutes it doesn’t bore, but leaves listeners craving for more. Beautifully composed, arranged, written and above all, sung!! Way to go, Vijay Verma!

 

6. Saiyaan
Singer ~ Raktima, Music by ~ Sajjad Ali, Lyrics by ~ Sajjad Ali

This song is a weird song. It starts with a haunting line by the singer, and the composition seems like one of A.R. Rahman’s less-impressive ones. It is a semi-classical song, which has been composed very averagely, so much that one cannot find oneself liking the song even after repeated hearing. I guess it will make sense only in the movie. Sajjad Ali’s arrangements consist mostly of techno beats and low-pitched flutes. And his lyrics are sad, but not heart-touching at all. Raktima, the singer, carries it out good, with apt backing vocals supporting her, and she even sounds like Madhushree in the song. It didn’t really appeal to me; I don’t think it will to you either! Hard to grasp this composition, and pretty heavy to ears too!

 

7. Maula Karde Karam
Singers ~ Javed Ali, Altamash Faridi, Aftab Sabri & Hashim Sabri, Music by ~ Rashid Khan, Lyrics by ~ Tanveer Ghazi

The melodious welcome to this last song on the soundtrack, is done by beautiful notes on a bulbultarang, which ensure you that a Qawwali is definitely to follow. And just as you had predicted, a divine Qawwali starts with Altamash singing (very expertly) the prelude to it. He sings his part at the start and other parts throughout the song with brilliance. The Sabri brothers, Aftab & Hashim, also do well, and are a great choice for such a Qawwali. All three of these singers sing with utter ease and impeccability, but the one who shines has got to be Javed Ali. With his voice, a mix of smoothness and folksiness, he just takes away your breath, and forces you to say that waah! Of course, as I said, Altamash, Aftab & Hashim are close behind. However, all the credit has to go to Rashid Khan, who has churned out such a catchy, and heavenly Qawwali, which was definitely not expected from him after his above average other song from this album. But each line in the song has been treated with infinite love and care, as is evident when we hear the result, a perfect combination of brilliance and divinity and catchiness. All the traditional Qawwali instruments can be heard in the arrangements, from dholaks, to tablas, to the bulbul tarang mentioned before and the beautiful harmoniums with jingle-bell type chimes. Half the beauty of the arrangements lies in the percussion — a wonderful experience. Lyrics by Tanveer Ghazi are a great mix of romance and devotion. It is one of the romantic Qawwalis which are addressed to God. And the most important thing about the song is, that even though it stands at a long duration of seven minutes, there’s not a single dull or bland or boring moment in the entire song! A beautiful and divine end to the album by Rashid Khan. Definitely the best song of the album! Excellent singing, arrangements and lyrics too! You can’t miss it! #5StarHotelSong!!


Ishq Ke Parindey is one of those albums for movies with a small budget and a very short reach, which unexpectedly surprises highly. Each and every song is as per needs of the script, though as individual songs, a couple don’t strike chords with listeners. However, most of them are such that will instantly appeal to you. All three tracks by Vijay Verma are beautiful and lovable, while Rashid Khan and Sajjad Ali each impress with one of their tracks out of three. However, Rashid’s one song overshadows all of the other tracks on the album. Rarely do albums like these come, which have small reaches and a puny audience but which have very worthwhile songs. The last I remember was ‘Jigariyaa’. With heavy promotion and maybe better-known faces, the album would’ve gotten the deserved acknowledgement, but there are pretty less hopes now. All I can say is that this “Parinda” (the album; parinda means ‘bird’ in Hindi) with small wings (the small budget of the film and album) has flown pretty high!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Maula Karde Karam > Dil Tod Ke > Ek Hatheli > Ishq Ke Parindey Pt. 1 > Tumse Mil Ke > Rab Se Maangi > Ek Hatheli (Sad) > Ishq Ke Parindey Pt. 2 > Saiyaan

 

Which is your favourite song from Ishq Ke Parindey? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

Next: 12th Music Mastani Monthly Awards (April 2015)