TANISHK-VAYU KI SHAANDAAR DAAVAT!! (SHUBH MANGAL SAAVDHAN – Music Review)

How clever, how innovative and how unconventional! In keeping with the unconventional theme of this movie, the music company Eros Music (who before this, have never disappointed me in releasing music on time!) have thought of a very innovative music release strategy i.e, to not release the album as a “full album” even after the movie has released! Wow!! How nice! One of the composers of the album, Vayu Srivastava, (@purevayu on Twitter) though was kind enough to assure me that this was the last song; so going ahead with the review!

UPDATE (5th September 2017): Eros Now has now released the full OST, and it does indeed, only have five songs.


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 5th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st September 2017

Shubh Mangal Saavdhan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on ErosNow CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan is a Bollywood film, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar in the lead roles, directed by debutant R.S. Prasanna and produced by Aanand L. Rai and Krishika Lulla. The film revolves around the film’s leading man, who suffers from ‘erectile dysfunction’, what he calls a ‘Gent’s Problem’. The madness and mayhem that follows in the already engaged to be married couple’s life is the premise of the story. (Because the adults have found out as well!) So the theme is quirky and the film has been getting RAVE reviews, but there was no sign of the music album, even after the film had released! Eros Music seems to be following a certain promotional strategy, and I must say, it’s the worst promotional strategy ever, where the promotion carries on even after film release! At least Sony Music releases the album 11-12 hours before the film, leaving the music lovers satisfied! This irresponsible type of music release where the music released after the movie, is just plain weird. Anyway, the music album happens to be fast-coming-to-the-top composer duo Tanishk-Vayu’s first solo album, in which they’ve composed all songs, and even written all the songs! And whatever I’ve heard of Tanishk-Vayu’s music, it is always quirky and zany, and a brilliant mix of Indian and Western sounds, so I’m sure that they would provide amazing music for this film, about the wedding of two people from small middle-class families in Delhi! Let’s dive in and see how sumptuous their wedding feast turns out to be!


1. Rocket Saiyyan

Singers ~ Ritu Pathak, Brijesh Shandilya & Tanishk Bagchi

“Duniya palat doonga, tu na lena tension,
Tere hi liye hai meri sagli attention,
Dekho na baby dil ki wire ke length ko,
Chhukar dekho pyaar waale current ko!
Baatein kare phenke gulaab, hamare saiyyan,
Aisi velocity janaab, phawware saiyyan,
Rocket hamare saiyyan!!”

Tanishk-Vayu start their first solo album, with a quirky romantic song, with the peppiness quotient very high. The song is a quirky take on the quintessential Indian Wedding songs, and the duo’s small experiments all throughout the song make it so appealing. The composition, for one, is so crazy and zany, it appeals instantly, to people who are open to loving weird stuff, and I’m one of them! Right from the beginning, the duo uses quirky sounds to catch the attention of the listener, and it works in a weird way. The actual composition is very simple, and in some places I could tell they’re just trying to be overtly crazy and weird, but it just works so well, you don’t have time to think about it. The song has a mukhda and an antara, the mukhda by the female singer, while the antara is by the male. Both have the same, crazy kind of tune, and the hookline is very catchy, as it should be. However, it might just be reduced to a “Comedy” song. There is a certain quality in the arrangements as well — the quirk creeps into the music too, and alongside the usual wedding percussion, we get funny sounds like babies crying, and other computerised noises, that just act as nice attractions throughout the short song. The use of the shehnaai (Seems digital) in the interlude produces quite a humorous effect. The vocals are good for the type of song it is — Ritu Pathak, returning to sing after a long, long time, manages it very well, and a bit off tune too, producing a good, imperfect effect that suits the song very well. Brijesh Shandilya, the composers’ favourite, also does an amazing job, but has a very little portion. The lyrics by the duo too, are funny and cute. A song that might irritate a lot of people, but the quirk is what you have to look out for!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kanha / Kanha (Unplugged)

Singers ~ Shashaa Tirupati / Ayushmann Khurrana

“Roke mohe, toke mohe, kaate re dagar o re Yamuna ke tatt ki,
Laaj nahi, kaaj nahi, maare jo kankariya, toh phoote mori matki,
Vaak chatur bharmaave, prem jaar arjhaave,
Jo bhi kare, kare sab quick, quick, quick, quick!
Kahun main piya ji thoda karlo sabar par na, maane na,
Kanha, maane na!”

This next song happens to be Tanishk-Vayu’s most straightforward song of their career, conforming the most to conventional standards than any of their other songs that have all been quirky! Of course, that was called for here, since they had to compose a thumri, and you can’t really mess with thumris. They have a particular fixed structure, and a way of making them. That being said, the duo does a wonderful job in making their first semi-classical song, and they win half the battle with the strong composition itself! The composition is so free-flowing, like so many of the Radha-Krishna songs of Bollywood. I can just predict that this will make its place in the list of Great Bollywood Krishna songs. The hookline is just so sweet, and instantly likeable, and the composition of the entire thumri has a very tangible Rahman touch to it; it is impossible to dislike that. It freshens your mind up instantly, as good Indian classical music always does. The song is presented to us in two versions — one by a professional, and a female version, as conventional thumris usually are. That version is sung by the awesome Shashaa Tirupati, who uses her sweet voice to melt your heart singing the thumri. She’s getting really good classical based numbers in the Rahman camp as well this year, and now she gets to sing this one, which almost sounds as if it’s a spawn of the Rahman songs. The duo give the female version a beautiful, traditional arrangement, with amazing tablas, sarod, and awe-inspiring flute solos. It is a delight to the ears, and the richness of the music just can’t be forgotten for a long time. It starts so richly too, with the background vocalists singing a nice vocal rhythm, alongside the playful combo of the santoor and flute! But even with all the conventional-ness of the arrangements, the duo tries something unconventional, and adds drumbeats every time before the hookline, and that’s what makes the song even more interesting! The second version is by the leading man of the film, Ayushmann Khurrana, who seems to be singing at least one song in every film of his nowadays. Of course, since he can sing so well, he aces the song, but I never knew he could sing classical this well. Of course, it doesn’t sound professional, but it is good enough! The duo decorate this one with a beautiful guitar riff (Tapas Roy) and a nice loop on the ukulele that’s so captivating! So while one version is completely semiclassical, the other one follows a more “Unplugged” (as it is named) route, with the guitar playing the lead role. Last but definitely not the least, the lyrics of both versions are beautiful. I commend the duo for using traditional words like “sakhi“, “laaj“, “panghat“, “badra“, and making it sound more rooted. And on the other hand, the duo uses English words, creating a fun contrast. The Radha-Krishna story has been kept intact, and the romance of the protagonists uses that as a backdrop, and it is so beautiful to listen to! Kudos to Tanishk-Vayu for a wholesome semiclassical number, in two delightful versions!!

Rating: 5/5 for Shashaa’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version

 

3. Laddoo

Singer ~ Mika Singh

“Boli aisi ke, tamatar bhi mangayein toh lage jaise mushaayaron mein
Baitha sunn raha hoon usko!
Aankhein aisi ke, milaayein jab nigaahein, ye nigaahein dagmagayein,
Kuch samajh mein bhi na aaye dil ko!
Ho, jab se mohabbat uthi, seene mein ghus gayi Gupti,
Iss dil ke laddoo bant gaye!”

The duo bring back the quirkiness and unconventional quality of the album with this song, a romantic song sung by Mika! Now, before we start complaining about how Mika isn’t suitable for romantic songs, I would like to remind you about “440 Volt” (Sultan) last year, which was a romantic song that wouldn’t have sounded half as good if Mika hadn’t sung it. This time, Tanishk-Vayu compose a very quirky number and rope Mika in to sing it. The composition is again, a very desi composition, that will appeal to your sense if you love traditional tunes with an innate quirk. The mukhda is amazing, the antaras make sure you don’t make your attention wander elsewhere, but the hookline is the best part — it is so short and simple, as if they’re stating an obvious fact, “Iss Dil Ke Laddoo Bant Gaye!” and it’s over as soon as it starts. That’s the best part of this hookline; it doesn’t hover around for long and waste your time. The arrangements are very beautiful — a very traditional beat of manjeeras and dholaks among rich guitar riffs sounds very interesting, and never before heard. The shehnaai-like sounds are also very fun to listen to. The manjeeras give the song a very unconventional and traditional rhythm, and that is what made me listen very closely to the arrangements in the first place! Towards the end we get a fun shehnaai portion, and it seems to be a sweet conclusion to the fun-filled romantic song. The vocals by Mika are surprisingly amazing; the duo seem to have done a good job in giving him the right brief, and so he doesn’t eat up many of his words here! The way he sings the hook is a way nobody else could’ve done it! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and the comedy element is intact even in this song. The quirkiest romantic song I’ve heard in a while!!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Kankad

Singers ~ Raja Hasan, Shashaa Tirupati, Rajnigandha Shekhawat & Arman Hasan

“Mere liye tu Ram na Ranjha, utna bahut hai, jitna sanjha,
Chhote bade sab tere, sapne hain mere abb,
Mere wale sapne toh, sach mein hain mere abb,
Tu jo rahega toh, saath dega toh, Rab se kya mangungi main,
Sab kuch toh paa lungi main,
Dil yeh kahin ladkhadaye agar toh thaam le na please!
Kankad bhi kabhi koi aa nahi sakta tere mere beech!!”

The duo wind up the album with a wedding song, but again, it is a very traditional wedding song, and full of emotion! The composition is very heavy on emotion as well; and it focuses on the emotion much more than it does on the enjoyment factor! At the end it basically just freshens your mind and makes you feel good. The makers had kept this song hidden until even after the movie was released, but I don’t understand why, because it was such a beautiful number!! The composition showcases Tanishk-Vayu’s versatility, and they prove that they can compose emotional numbers just as well as those upbeat comic numbers. The hookline especially is steeped with emotion — you can just feel the emotion through the earphones as it plays. The arrangements too, represent some of the duo’s most rich arrangements in terms of folk instruments and traditional sounds. The quintessential wedding chorus starts the song off, with a tumbi sound, and your interest is peaked right there. The dholaks, dafli, strings and a surprise element of the shehnaai in the interlude all provide an amazingly rich arrangement, at the same time keeping things very enjoyable and danceable on! The whole composition and arrangements have a very distinct Rahmanish touch to them! The vocals are beautiful, with Raja Hasan (after a long time, yo!) taking care of the male portions well, keeping the emotion intact. However, he could have been better in certain places.  The female singer, Shashaa Tirupati, has a very small part, but still manages to steal the lightning, as that part has been composed so thoughtfully by the composers, and it is full of tangible emotion. The various backing vocalists like the small child singing at the end, provide a nice “grand Indian wedding” feel to the song. But still, the lyrics which are so full of emotion, do not make you feel as if it is a conventional Bollywood wedding song; it is just too sweet for that! The lyrics are what make you realise the true meaning of the song, and I salute the makers for making this emotional song against the backdrop of the wedding. Last month we saw an emotional song against the backdrop of the Holi festival, ‘Gori Tu Latth Maar’ (Toilet: Ek Prem Katha), and this time, Tanishk-Vayu follow the same template, to make another beautiful wedding song full of love and emotion! A commendable job, to create an emotional wedding song! Not your everyday Bollywood Wedding song!! This ends the album on a very high note!!

Rating: 5/5


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan really proved how talented Tanishk-Vayu are. Usually, they appear in multicomposer albums where they hardly get enough scope to show their talent in composing for an entire movie, with a particular theme running throughout the movie. Here, when they get the chance finally, they make great use of the opportunity and provide us with an enjoyable album full of quirky music, and also some emotional music. Their method of fusing quirky sounds with traditional desi beats and tunes, really is the hallmark of their music, and it is what makes their music light, fluffy and a delectable treat to listen to! Thank you, Tanishk and Vayu, for treating us to such a delicious wedding feast of an album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 92%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kanha = Kankad > Laddoo = Kanha (Unplugged) > Rocket Saiyyan

 

Which is your favourite song from Shubh Mangal Saavdhan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂