DANCE, ROMANCE AUR GANGSTERPANTI!! (SAHEB BIWI AUR GANGSTER 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rana Mazumder, Siddharth Pandit, Anjjan Bhattacharya & Madan Mohan
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Revant Shergill, Sandeep Nath, Kausar Munir & Raja Mehdi Ali Khan
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 26th July 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th July 2018

Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 is a Bollywood action / crime thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Jimmy Shergill, Chitrangada Singh and Mahie Gill in lead roles, directed by Tigmanshu Dhulia and produced by Rahul Mittra and Tigmanshu Dhulia. The film opened to mostly negative reviews, but thankfully, we music reviewers don’t have to poke our little noses into that. The music album of the film is primarily composed by Rana Mazumder, who made a spectacular  debut last year with Tigmanshu Dhulia’s ‘Raag Desh’, in which the guest composer was Siddharth Pandit, also featuring as guest composer here. They are joined by Anjjan Bhattacharya too, the second guest composer. Now, I barely remember any tracks from the previous installments of this franchise, showing how short their repeat value was. Let’s see whether the tracks in this instalment are any better.


Let’s get the songs by the two guest composers covered first — just my OCD, nothing else. 😂

Kesariya Jugni is another of the countless takes on the ‘Jugni’ folk song, but other than the tumbi nothing reminds me of the original, so I don’t think I’d classify it as a recreation! Anjjan Bhattacharya, who I always believed to be the melody master when Meet Bros. Anjjan was still a trio, takes the opposite path here; he relies more on the sound to propel his song forth. The aforementioned tumbi gives the song its required Punjabi energy, while other techno sounds help give it a universal connect. Dhols and all are present, but don’t contribute much. My favourite touch was the “Aao ji aao sarkar…” portion sung by Amit Gupta. The Nooran Sisters (whose surprisingly it is the first song of the year ONLY! 😕) carry the entire song on the shoulders; whenever it starts getting remotely repetitive, the Noorans keep it interesting and listen-worthy. Kumaar’s lyrics are something that would fit into a ‘Tanu Weds Manu 3’ as well, but Anjjan’s music it what makes it suit the vibe of this franchise.

The other guest composer Siddharth Pandit creates the Baba Theme, which succeeds as a gangster song, but fails to keep the listener attentive. Revant Shergill’s rendition is weak, the composition is closer to a recitation of sorts, and the arrangements are way too repetitive (more than Sanju’s ‘Baba Bolta Hai’ too!) for my liking. Revant Shergill even pens the lyrics, which again, are unsatisfactory. This song is something to skip if you get bored of repetitive sounds in songs.

Rana Mazumder starts his portion of the album with a recreation (more like a cover) of Lag Ja Gale from ‘Woh Kaun Thi’. After Lata Mangeshkar, the only singer who’s gotten even close to her rendition was Shreya Ghoshal, who I’ve been fortunate enough to hear singing this live! Rana Mazumder though, ropes in Jonita Gandhi, who had me floored by her rendition! Obviously not close to Lata di’s rendition, but from the current crop of singers, it’s only Gandhi who can get even this close to Shreya’s rendition too. What’s an added bonus, is that Mazumder keeps the arrangements really, really wonderful. The calmness and emotion of the original song has been kept intact, since Rana has used a beautiful orchestra, wonderful twinkling sounds, a mellifluous flute, chimes, and even a well-placed, iconic sitar. Of course, Madan Mohan ji‘s song is immortal, but I’m pleasantly surprised with this presentation of it. It is definitely a recreation I’d want to reach a million views in a day, but sadly, that kind of ‘recognition’ is in some other song’s fortune. 😦

As we veer over to Rana Mazumder’s original part of the album, we see a shift in the music from the modern, gangster-y music which the two guest composers had used in their songs, to a noticeably Pancham-ish vibe in Mazumder’s original songs. Three of the next five songs have that distinct Pancham touch, the first one being Andheron Mein Rishtey, which features in two versions, both with the same jazzy arrangement, which was a staple arrangement for detective/gangster films in the 70s or so. The trumpets are fascinating, as is the bass, and the composition is aptly sinister, as are Sandeep Nath’s lyrics. The Male Version by Arijit Singh falls below the Female Version by Mandakini Bora (newcomer?) though; Arijit’s sleepy voice just didn’t suit the theme of the song. Mandakini renders the song sensuously; such songs are best in female voices, I feel. That said though, her voice isn’t something I’d listen to the song solely for.

More along the Panchamda vibe is Dil Ka Parinda, which is crooned by the composer along with Usha Uthup. It starts with a pacy Latin rhythm with amazing Spanish guitars and Caribbean-style percussions. The first time around, the song sounds a bit pretentious, but it grows on you with the number of times you listen to it; Usha Uthup as usual is at her best in such songs; she leaves no stone unturned in making it her own song. Even composer Rana Mazumder tries to pull off a Pancham, but he doesn’t do it as well as he had done under Vishal-Shekhar’s music direction in ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ (The Dirty Picture). Even if you don’t like retro songs, you should listen to this song if only for the guitars and percussions. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics, yet again, are fun, though nothing exciting.

Rana departs from the Pancham vibe gradually, but Aye Huzoor still has some distinct Pancham touches in the arrangements. Rana uses sitar wonderfully again, and a very commendable use of muffled tabla sounds makes it a very delightful composition. The ‘Hey Shona’ (Ta Ra Rum Pum) duo Shaan and Sunidhi Chauhan render the song beautifully; Sunidhi is singing in the same voice which she had sung in, in that song as well. Though the composition is listener-friendly, I don’t think I see myself revisiting it many times in the future. Kausar Munir has written some cliché Bollywood romance lyrics, but they’re not dated as in irritating at all.

The last song, Davaa Bhi Woh, is drastically different from the previous songs of the album. It is entirely reminiscent of the Ismail Darbar – Sanjay Leela Bhansali combinations in ‘Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam’ and ‘Devdas’, especially the latter. Right from the female chorus in the beginning, to the overbearing tablas and kathak sounds, like the ghungroos and bols, this song is splendid. The new singer Saberi Bhattacharya is wonderful as well, and reminds me of Alka Yagnik in places. Rana Mazumder spins a beautiful melody based on Raag Khamaaj (I believe; don’t quote me) and reminds you of other songs like ‘Jagaave Saari Raina’ (Dedh Ishqiya). The conclusion to the song is magnificent as it should be, and I wonder what it is doing here in this soundtrack. 🙄


Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3 turns out to be the most memorable album of the franchise; I can see myself humming most of these tunes in the near future at least! Rana Mazumder manages to churn out entertainingly varied songs even for a gangster flick!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 4 + 8.5 + 6 + 6.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 9 = 55

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Davaa Bhi Woh > Lag Ja Gale > Aye Huzoor > Dil Ka Parinda > Andheron Mein Rishtey (Female) = Kesariya Jugni > Andheron Mein Rishtey (Male) > Baba Theme

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 29 (from previous albums) + 01 = 30

Which is your favourite song from Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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A PATRIOTIC VIBE THAT TOUCHES THE HEART!! (RAAG DESH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rana Mazumder, Siddharth Pandit & Ram Singh Thakuri
♪ Lyrics by: Sandeep Nath, Revant Shergill, Rana Mazumder & Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th July 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 28th July 2017

Raag Desh Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raag Desh is a Bollywood period drama, based on the Indian National Army set up by Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, and the war fought to liberate India from the British Government, which was fought on the shores of Irrawaddy in Burma. The film stars Kunal Kapoor, Amit Sadh and Mohit Marwah as the three INA soldiers who were court-martialled, Colonel Prem Sehgal, Colonel Gurbaksh Singh Dhillon, and Major Shah Nawaz Khan. The film is directed by Tigmanshu Dhulia and produced by Gurdeep Singh Sappal. This film, right from when its first look came out, I was not even expecting it to have music album. However, it does have four songs. The composers are relative newcomers. The leading composer, Rana Mazumder, is somebody we have heard singing in various albums for a long time, but with this film, he ventures into music direction and composed two songs, one in two versions. The second composer, Siddharth Pandit, debuted with ‘Laali Ki Shaadi Mein Laaddoo Hua Deewaana’ earlier this year; as a member of composer duo (Revant-Siddharth). Here, only he has composed, but Revant has written the lryics and sung the song so practically, they’re still together. I do not know what to expect from the album yet, but hopefully, it is a good patriotic album!


1. Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai

Singers ~ K.K. & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Composition of INA Anthem by ~ Ram Singh Thakuri, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Nath, Lyrics of INA Anthem by ~ Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla

The album dives right into the patriotism, with a hard-hitting, anthemic song that just makes you feel proud to be an Indian. (Assuming you are one, otherwise, hello from India!) The composer cleverly makes use of INA’s anthem, “Qadam Qadam Badhaaye Jaa”, in a way that seems as if the two songs were meant to be together. The seamless transition from Rana Mazumder’s new composition, to the INA anthem, is wonderful. The song starts with an amazingly patriotic sound, with trumpet fanfare, progressing into a vibrant marching beat. The composition is just as abrupt and staccato as the beats; it jumps right into the patriotism with no dilly-dallying. It lifts your spirits instantly. A wonderfully melodious stanza in the middle by Shreya Ghoshal wins your heart. The instrumentation is grand and royal; with the brass band and the drum beats being the most prominent. The orchestra does a wonderful job playing the short notes in the upbeat portions, and the drawn-out and dreamy notes in the short melodious portion. Even rock guitars make their presence felt. Rana’s composing finesse is exposed when he goes seamlessly from the upbeat to the melodious portions. And the clever usage of the INA anthem is something I can go on and on about. The vocals are splendid. K.K. and Shreya Ghoshal, two vocalists we are used to having heard together so many times in the late 2000s, do a wonderful job. It isn’t a duet as such; K.K. leads the proceedings with a strong anthemic resonance to his voice, and the Backing chorus repeats after him. Shreya gets that one portion in the middle, but she aces it. When she sings her aalaap at the end of the song, though, you feel that it was worth hearing her for just that small portion! The lyrics by Sandeep Nath are aptly patriotic. A wonderful and motivating start to the album!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Tujhe Namaami Ho

Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, K.K., Shreya Ghoshal & Rana Mazumder, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Nath

As soon as this song starts, you know there’s something brilliant in store for you. The xylophone (santoor?) notes are enough to make you engrossed right away. And then, as Sunidhi Chauhan starts singing, you just get a chill sent through your body; it is so beautiful! Rana composes yet another mind blowing song; this time very heavily depending on the composition. The composition doesn’t let you down, and with its calm and composed nature, wins over your heart. The mellifluous tune is enough to have you listen to the song on loop. The antara beautifully traverses the high notes, and the four vocalists do great justice to the composition. The instrumentation is heavenly as well. Strings, santoor, and the sitar make up the main part of the arrangements. The orchestra especially, does an amazing job. The “Janmabhumi, Matrubhumi” hook has a wonderful show of strings in the background. About the vocals, whatever can be said is not enough. Rana’s decision to have four singers sing this song is quite a less-opted-for decision these days, but he manages all four of them very well, without using any autotune for any of them. Sunidhi sounds a lot like Kavita Krishnamurthy when she starts! She handles the calm notes beautifully like she always does. K.K. sounds great as always, and so does Shreya. The voice that stands out though, is Rana’s. We have heard him in many songs, and his earthy and raw voice is such a boon to this song; it give it such a humble feel! The chorus vocals are haunting, and give the song an amazing feel. The lyrics are as beautiful as patriotic lyrics can get! A heart-moving patriotic number that should get the recognition it deserves!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Ghar Chhaado

Singers ~ Rana Mazumder & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Composition of INA Anthem by ~ Ram Singh Thakuri, Lyrics by ~ Rana Mazumder, Lyrics of INA Anthem by ~ Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla

The next song is just the Bengali version of “Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai”, and the song sounds so relevant in Bengali, Subhash Chandra Bose being a Bengali man himself. Rana replaces K.K. as the lead singer here, and sings it wonderfully. The Hindi lyrics from “Qadam Qadam” though, haven’t been replaced. Shreya’s Bengali is to die for, as always! Here, however, Rana does away with the earthiness in his voice, and renders it straightforwardly. A relevant reprise of the anthem.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Teri Zameen

Singers ~ Shriya Pareek, Revant Shergill & Siddharth Pandit, Music by ~ Siddharth Pandit, Lyrics by ~ Revant Shergill

Siddharth Pandit, from composer duo Revant-Siddharth, another relatively new composer, brings up the caboose of the album, with a song that haunts you with its intensely patriotic vibe. The composition is just as lilting as that word can get. It starts right away, giving us goosebumps right from the first note. The line “desh ke maathe pe..” has been composed in such an ethereal way, and it shakes you with its haunting vibe. The song is more like a background number, but it sounds amazing in headphones. The “Qadam Qadam” song gets a little portion of this song as well, but Pandit gives it a different tune, unlike how it was incorporated with its own tune in ‘Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai’. The mukhda’s tune repeats in the last stanza, and it haunts yet again. Though the song has almost the same hook running throughout (It has three hooks that repeat), it doesn’t feel boring even once. The arrangements are just as haunting as the composition. The percussion is breathtaking, and the chimey sounds, and the sounds of the plucked string instruments, all set up a very sublime ambience. The way the song starts, like a classical song, with the hum of the tanpura, and then folksy strings accompanying it, is probably the most catchy start to such a song ever. The vocalists do proper justice to the composition — Shriya Pareek, debutante, sounding a lot like Neeti Mohan, sings her portions in a spellbinding manner! The two male vocalists do well too, especially the one singing “Elaan kar Kakkar bhar”. The lyrics by Siddharth’s companion, Revant, are top notch as well, again, having to do with patriotism, of course! A perfect haunting finale to the wonderful patriotic album!

Rating: 5/5


Raag Desh was an album I was expecting very less from, to be frank. However, the outcome just blows my mind. Two newcomers (one almost newcomer), and both giving such heart-rending melodies to the album, is quite a rare thing to hear! I wish to hear more from them now!! All three songs (and the Bengali version) are beautiful and full of patriotic vibes, keeping with the theme of the film. A short and sweet album, with also serves as the medium for a smashing debut for Mazumder!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 = 18

Album Percentage: 90%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tujhe Namaami Ho = Teri Zameen > Hawaaon Mein Aag Hai = Ghar Chaado

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 20 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Raag Desh) = 21

 

Which is your favourite song from Raag Desh? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂