A RISHI RICH BEAT SAVES THE POSTER BOYS!! (POSTER BOYS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Daler Mehndi, Dilip-Sameer, Rishi Rich, Sunai Marathe, Shreyas Iyengar & Sonny Ravan
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Javed Akhtar, Kumaar, Saurabh Pandey & Sonny Ravan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 8th September 2017

Poster Boys Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Poster Boys is an upcoming satirical Bollywood film, starring Sunny Deol, Bobby Deol and Shreyas Talpade in lead roles. The film is an official remake of Shreyas-directed Marathi film ‘Poshter Boyz’, and is also directed by Shreyas Talpade himself. The film is produced by Sunny Sounds Pvt. Ltd., Shreyas Talpade and Deepti Talpade. The film revolves around three men who suffer humiliation in their village when they appear on an advertisement for vasectomy, without their knowledge or permission. The film seems like a comic caper, at the same time trying to create awareness about this. The music, which I actually expect to be bad, just because this film seems like one of those films where music plays a minuscule role, is by four composer entities. Remake master Tanishk Bagchi comes back with a remake here, while Rishi Rich gets to compose an original. The album also serves as the debut vehicle for three new composers, a duo, Sunai Marathe Shreyas Iyengar, and an individual, Sonny Ravan. So let’s see how this album with half its songs by known personalities, and half by newcomers, fares!


1. Kudiyan Shehar Diyan

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Dilip-Sameer & Daler Mehndi, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Javed Akhtar, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

So T-Series messes up with credits again — the old song ‘Kudiya Shehar Di’ (Arjun Pandit; 1999) which this song is a remake of, was credited to Dilip and Sameer Sen, but now they credit Daler Mehndi as its composer! Anyway, Tanishk (the go-to recreator these days) tries to infuse more life into the already lifeless and staid Punjabi number (or so I personally feel), by giving it a better mixed dhol arrangement, and having Neha Kakkar sing the female parts. But replacing one screechy singer (Alka Yagnik in the original) with another screechy singer, is not too wise! The only energy in the song is because of Mehndi’s amazing singing. Tanishk hasn’t actually newly composed anything; the song is just permutation and combination of the parts in the old song. Lyrics are functional, nothing great. An okayish remake of an okayish song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Kendhi Menoo

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Sukriti Kakar & Ikka Singh, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Rishi Rich is in charge of the next song: a nice hip hop number with a peppy and groovy beat that instantly has you hooked. The composition too, is quite catchy. Especially the hookline’s tune. The antara isn’t great, but good enough to go with the amazing beats. The arrangements are the highlight of the song, and those trumpet sounds are some of the best beats in a Bollywood hip-hop song this year. That being said, it isn’t like the song is extraordinary either, just surprisingly good enough and compared to the others in the album, it is a masterpiece. The vocals are nice too, with Yash Narvekar and Sukriti carrying the hip-hop vibe very well. I wish Sukriti wouldn’t mumble though. Ikka’s rap is good too! The lyrics are understandably ordinary. A good hip-hop number with a groovy “Rishi Rich beat”.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Noor-E-Khuda

Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, Lyrics by ~ Saurabh Pandey

This song is the typical Bollywood sad Qawwali, which gets played in movies whenever things are going wrong. Usually it’s Sukhwinder Singh or Kailash Kher singing these Qawwalis, and sure enough, here, the newcomer duo, Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, present the song in Kher’s voice. The composition itself is very maudlin and typically dramatic. The roopak rhythm, as overused as it is, sounds very heavy here, and I am beginning to feel like it should be used less often now! The tablas and claps too, are very typical — nothing new. The lyrics are good as they should be, but again, very typical. Kailash Kher has the tendency to bore in such songs, but here it’s everything else that draws you away from the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

4. The Posterboys Anthem

Singer ~ Shree D, Music by ~ Sonny Ravan, Lyrics by ~ Sonny Ravan

Now the second debutant gets to end the album with something called the “Poster Boys Anthem”, and I must say, it is quite a tedious anthem. And also one of the saddest debuts I’ve seen. The composition is dead, and seems like someone who doesn’t know much about what it takes to make a good song, came out and composed a song for an everyday morcha, and decided to use it here. I don’t even know where this kind of a song would fit as the theme song to a satire as this. The vocals are so bad, it’s unbelievable. SKIP!

Rating: 0.5/5


Poster Boys is yet another bad multicomposer album. It pains us reviewers when our point is proved that the multicomposer trend is slowly corroding the quality of music. Well, actually, the trend isn’t to blame here. The makers could’ve gone for more established and seasoned artists, who would’ve composed some good music!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2.5 + 3.5 + 2 + 0.5 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kendhi Menoo > Kudiyan Shehar Diyan > Noor-E-Khuda > The Posterboys Anthem

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 30 (from previous albums) + 01 = 31

 

Which is your favourite song from Poster Boys? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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A TRIPLE-DEBUT TREAT TOILET!! (TOILET: EK PREM KATHA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar & Sachet-Parampara
♪ Lyrics by: Siddharth-Garima
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

Toilet – Ek Prem Katha Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an upcoming Bollywood satire, starring Alshay Kumar, Bhumi Pednekar, Divyendu Sharma and Anupam Kher,  directed by Shree Narayan Singh, and produced by Aruna Bhatia, Shital Bhatia, Abundantia, Viacom Motion Pictures, Arjun N. Kapoor and Hitesh Thakkar. The film comes in support of PM Modi’s ‘Swacchh Bharat Abhiyaan’ by raising fingers at the issue of open defecation, prevalent in remote and underdeveloped parts of the country. Now it is a really good topic, but somehow, by the trailer and promos, I am not sure whether it will be carried out in a humorous way without looking dramatic. Anyway, the music, very surprisingly, has been scored by three debutant music composers, two duos and one individual. Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar and Sachet-Parampara are the five lucky people who got to debut in Bollywood with an Akshay Kumar album, and how wonderful an opportunity is that!! I hope they make great use of it though, and provide us with a nice and clean ‘Toilet’! {Sorry for the desperate joke!}


1. Hans Mat Pagli

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

The first newcomer starts off the album with a cute romantic song which sends off a great rural-setting vibe. The song’s composition is nothing innovative as such, but it still manages to hook the listeners, since it is so cute and such a throwback to Bollywood of the 90s. The only grouse I have with the composition is that the hookline sounds a lot like the antara of ‘Pardesi Pardesi’ (Raja Hindustani), which would be where the 90s vibes are coming from. The song is structured quite oddly, with a male mukhda, a male antara, and then a female mukhda followed by a female antara. Why couldn’t they just club the mukhdas together and the antaras together? That way, the listener would get some variation from male to female and then back to a male voice. Anyway, as they wish. The composition for all these stanzas is very cute again. The recording seems a bit faulty and raw, but that’s probably deliberate? The arrangements are again, not anything new or innovative, but that soft Qawwali setting to the hookline gives a soothing feeling, and the dholaks have been played beautifully, as are the plucked string instruments throughout the song, and the guitar itself. There is a wonderful rapid tabla piece before Sonu sings his antara. The rhythm is heard before, but the cuteness of the composition helps you listen to such a rhythm yet again without complaining. The vocals send you back to 2005-2007, when Sonu-Shreya duets were the thing. Every director wanted a Sonu-Shreya duet in their film; sadly, nowadays, that happens only in films where the director knows only about the old singers, and hence his music ends up sounding outdated. But here, there is no datedness whatsoever. It is more like a nostalgia. Both singers do an amazing job, though I somewhere thought that Shreya was struggling with such a high-pitched line in the antara. Siddharth-Garima choose the perfect line for the hookline; it increases the cuteness quotient of the song. The rest of the lyrics are cute too, but not too innovative. A good song to start the album with, but it has its own faults.
Rating: 4/5

 

2. Bakheda

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

Vickey has the second song to his credit as well, making him the main composer on this album. This song takes a more lively route, but stays a romantic song. As soon as it starts, the folksy vibe hits you, and you are also relieved that Vickey has used a more modern recording style for this one; it proves that the recording was deliberately done that way for the previous song. The composition is a lively one, but the hookline is really a letdown — it is so staid and bland. Also, we have heard such a hook so many times where the mukhda builds up to it, and then after a pause, the hookline takes the song forward. The antaras are very well composed. Sukhwinder, at his usual energetic self, renders the song with ease, and creates a good impact on the listeners. The problem lies in Sunidhi’s vocals, which seem less energetic as usual. It really sounds like she wasn’t interested, or maybe the pitch was too low. That makes her portion sound very odd, despite the beautiful composition of the antara. The arrangements are lively folksy arrangements with the percussion leading, and a nice plucked instrument entertaining throughout. A sarangi can also be made out occasionally. The percussion is the star of the song though. Siddharth-Garima, again, write an effective song to go with the film, but the impact of the lyrics doesn’t reach the audience out of the film. A functional song, but won’t really stay with you for long.
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Gori Tu Latth Maar

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Palak Muchhal, Backing Vocals ~ Umesh Joshi, Vijay Dhuri, Swapnil Godbole, Karan Kagale & Rishikesh Patel, Music by ~ Manas-Shikhar

The Rahman vibe hits you as soon as this one starts with the beautiful chimey music at the beginning. Manas-Shikhar, another debutant duo, enter the album with this song, and with only one song to prove their worth, they seize the opportunity and let me tell you, they make the best use of it, better than both of the other composer teams on this album! They employ a very lively setting to a supposed-to-be sad song. It is the festival of Holi, but of course, Bhumi Pednekar’s character is mad at Akshay’s character, because of we know what! So this is a situational song, in which Akshay pleads to her for forgiving him. Against the backdrop of a Holi song, a very emotional song, and I’ve heard something like this for the first time. Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics reveal all the emotion in the best way possible. Now let’s go back to Manas-Shikhar’s music. Their composition is just so catchy, especially the mukhda, which should be catchy in order to hook the listeners right away. It sounds like something straight out of a Rahman song. The hookline also succeeds in being a very beautiful, and catchy line. The antara is the female part of the song, and it has a very beautiful tune as well, which will remind you of the 90s songs, that used to slow down in the middle for the female parts. There’s a nice tempo-rise towards the end, in which we hear the already popular “Radhe Radhe” chorus. Sonu Nigam renders the tune with such brilliance, knowing when to emote which emotion, and wonderful aalaaps. Palak too, sings beautifully, and the brilliant composition of her portion helps her do that wonderfully. The arrangements are ever fluctuating, with the emotional and soft sound from the mukhda alternating with the usual Holi sound of the dholaks and other percussions. The shehnaai is played in a very beautiful tune. Those bells at the beginning are the most beautiful though. A wholesome song that defines what Bollywood is all about — colour, festivity, emotion and dance! Oh, and congratulations to Manas-Shikhar for a smashing debut!
Rating: 5/5

 

4. Subha Ki Train

Singers ~ Sachet Tandon & Parampara Thakur, Backing Vocals ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rituraj Mohanty, Music by ~ Sachet-Parampara

The last of the debutants bring up the finale of the album, which happens to be yet another cute romantic song. This one is a little less folksy than the others, but it does have the effect that it should. Sachet Tandon and Parampara Thakur have composed a lilting melody, that, though situational, and very predictable, still makes you smile and feel good. The prelude gave off some vibes of “Tere Sang Yaara” (Rustom). The mukhda is very sweet and simple, and instantly grabs your attention. The letdown here is the hook, which is as staid and heard-before as imaginable. But the antara is mind-blowing; especially the second line of it. The arrangements too, follow a very simple template, with that cute Duff rhythm, and in a wonderful second interlude, the flutes assortment and strings orchestra just mystifies. The first interlude with the mouth organ is splendid too. Sachet and Parampara handle the vocals themselves, and strangely enough, employ Rituraj Mohanty and Sukriti Kakar as backing vocalists for the aalaaps. Parampara’s is a voice to look out for, while Sachet’s voice just blends in with the multitude of new male voices we have in Bollywood, other than Arijit. 😅 Again, Siddharth-Garima stick to situational yet catchy lyrics; the hook lyrics made me smile. A good finale, and a promising debut, but not a song that will stay in my head for more than a month.
Rating: 3.5/5


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an album just like Akshay Kumar movie albums usually are — fun, vibrant and groovy, but with an overbearing romantic theme. What makes it even more special is that all the composers are debutants and it is commendable of the makers to have accepted the three for a film which will reach so many people! Seizing the opportunity, all three newcomers do a good job, and especially Manas-Shikhar do an amazing one. The album is a triple-debut treat!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 77.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Gori Tu Latth Maar > Hans Mat Pagli > Subha Ki Train > Bakheda

 

Which is your favourite song from Toilet – Ek Prem Katha? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AMAAL’S ‘NOOR’AANI ALBUM!! (NOOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st April 2017

Noor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Noor is an upcoming Bollywood drama starring Sonakshi Sinha in the titular role and Purab Kohli, Kanan Gill, Shibani Dandekar in supporting roles. The film, directed by Sunhil Sippy and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vikram Malhotra, is based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s novel, ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’ which is the account of a Pakistani journalist and her misadventures in both her profession and her love life. The film takes the setting to Mumbai, of course, or else who knows who would have to incur the wrath of You-Know-Who. Anyway, we are here for the music. So, the music of the film has been given by Amaal Mallik, making it his second ever completely solo album after ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’. Of course, I expect something fresh and light-hearted in keeping with the movie’s promos and theme. After two good songs in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ earlier this year, it is his second venture this year and hopefully it will get just as amazing a response.


1. Uff Yeh Noor

Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Aditi Paul, Abin Thomas, Shishir Samant & Akshay Jadhav, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Seedhe seedhe sab chale, par ye tedhi chale,
Afra-tafri ho jahaan, ye bas nahi miley,
Paagalon se zyaada paagal, miley zameen aur maange baadal,
Kahin se jaake zara akal laa,
Uff ye Noor, Wallah!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The first song happens to be an apt title song, a song that enlightens us on what we can expect from the character of Noor in the movie. And it does give us quite a detailed insight on that, as well. Amaal’s composition is not only buttery and light-hearted, forcing you to groove to it, but it is also instantly catchy. A very Amit Trivedi-ish vibe accompanies the composition, and that hookline is one of the cutest stuff I’ve heard in a while. The groove that the song carries with it, is just unmatchable. The composition of the antara is just amazing. What helps the composition big time are the arrangements, trying to lighten the mood even more, what with the amazing brass instruments — the trumpet (Ketan Sodha), the Saxophone (Shyaam) and the trombone (Blasco). These three instruments remind one of another song from the genre, ‘Suno Aisha’ (Aisha) which was by Amit Trivedi. There’s an amazing flute portion (Tejas Vinchurkar) towards the end of the song, that’s very easy to miss, so listen carefully, and there is also another flute/woodwinds portion in one of the interludes, which is amazingly played! Occasional strings and those two dholak beats (Akshay Jadhav) at the beginning of the hookline, are some easily missable additions that Amaal has added into the song. Of course, you can’t talk about this song without talking about the instrument that gives it most of its fresh vibes, which is the guitar (Meghdeep Bose). The vocals by Armaan are amazing, and show his versatility; of course he doesn’t just sing romantic songs! It is probably one of his best performances. He controls our emotions of fun and laughter so well in this song, and also conveys the character of Noor very perfectly, as does lyricist Manoj Muntashir. The lyrics are where the similarities to ‘Suno Aisha’ end officially. In ‘Aisha’, Aisha was placed on a pedestal and how her ego was raised when Amitabh Bhattacharya wrote stuff like “Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawaab ho Aisha.” On the other hand, Manoj is doing nothing but hurting Noor’s ego, by saying stuff like “Kahin se jaake nayi shakal laa, and “Aankhon mein gussa bhara hai, chehre pe baarah baja hai“! Jokes apart, Manoj does a great job writing the lyrics! A nice protagonist-oriented song, with innumerable fresh vibes!

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Gulabi 2.0 / Gulabi Redux

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik, Tulsi Kumar & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated & New Composition by ~ Amaal Mallik, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal!!!”

– Kumaar

We are all familiar with probably the most famous Rafi song ever, ‘Gulabi Aankhein’ (The Train), a song that almost everyone, from the kids, to the grandparents in India, know by heart. Why wouldn’t we know it, considering that it has been through so many remakes and recreations and revamps by the likes of Atif Aslam, Raghav Sachar and of course the wonderful performance by Sonu Nigam in London. Well, now, the makers of ‘Noor’ make sure we get yet another version of the song, this time, a club revamp. Well, this song actually un-grew on me. I used to like it (just like) the first time I heard it, but it just slipped away after that; I couldn’t bring myself to love it any more, and whatever I liked also started to seem ordinary. The good thing about this remake is, that it only retains the hook of the old song. However, the tune that works as padding, is a bit weak, except the “haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal” loop. The antara is super-ordinary, something I never expected from Amaal. The numerous interruptions going “gulabi, gulabi“, sound boring after some listens. There is an English female rap though, that is quite entertaining. The arrangements are mostly EDM, which is loud for the most part, but I will still maintain that it is better than all the noisy cacophony we find ourselves tripping to nowadays. Vocals are okay-ish as well, and the two versions differ from each other only in terms of vocals, the first one sung by Amaal, the second by Yash Narvekar. Still, Yash has backing vocals in the first song, and Amaal has backing vocals in the second. 😄😄 The two songs sound pretty much the same. The female singer is Tulsi Kumar, supposedly singing in a newly thick voice she has obtained. I just hope she doesn’t think that voice is good, and I hope she stops using this kind of voice. The additional lyrics by Kumaar are functional considering it is a club song. A cacophonous remake, which I hadn’t expected!

Rating: 3/5 for Gulabi 2.0, 3/5 for Gulabi Redux

 

3. Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai

Singer ~ Sukriti Kakar, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Mohini Gaur, Shishir Samant & Meghdeep Bose, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Yeh sabhi mausam ho rahe apne
Kal talak thhe jo ajnabi
Yeh safar yunhi le chala aage
Piche ab raahein na rahi!
Saari khwahishein,
Dil ki yeh farmaishein,
Tune suni iss tarah,
Koi duaa, jis tarah, sunle Khuda!”

– Kumaar

The next song turns out to be a very light-hearted romantic song, something that we know Amaal is an expert at, especially after ‘Sau Aasmaan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). This song is quite similar to that one in terms of overall feel of the song; a very sprightly and vivacious sound helps you forget your worries for the entire length of the song. The mukhda starts off quite abruptly, but you get used to it. The hookline is the peak of the song, obviously. But it is the antara that really surprised me pleasantly. I’ve never heard an antara starting so calmly and without making any ruckus like “Oh, I’m the antara now, you guys!” In fact, it just merges in so well with the interludes, you feel it is some extra stanza in the interlude, until it is so long that it has to be an antara. The arrangements add to the lightness of the song, the guitar (Ankur Mukherjee) played in this very MJ kind of way, is so oddly placed in such a song, yet so wonderful-sounding. The vocals are nice as well, Sukriti sounds cute in her very energetic rendition. I couldn’t help missing Neeti though, who usually sings such songs. Then I realised it would just sound like ‘Sau Aasmaan’ Part 2, so I started accepting Sukriti’s voice after that. 😂 The way she sings the sargam, in the first interlude is very beautiful. Kudos to Amaal for composing that. The backing vocalists really have a spectacular job, repeating the lines of the hookline after Sukriti. Lyrics are just as happy and boisterous as everything else, and suitable for the theme of the song. An enjoyable romantic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Hai Zaroori

Singer ~ Prakriti Kakar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Nasamajh thhe hum, jo yeh bhi na samjhe,
Waqt aane par, sab badalte hain!
Manzilein kya hain, aur raaste kya hain,
Log pal bhar mein, yahaan rabb badalte hain!
Kisi ke vaaste kahaan, kinaare aayi kashtiyaan,
Yeh dooriyan hai bas dooriyan!
Ke chori chori chupke se chupke se rona, hai zaroori,
Ke paani paani ankhiyon ka, ankhiyon ka hona, hai zaroori,
Reh gayi aarzoo ik adhuri,
Ke kabhi kabhi aisa bhi, aisa bhi hona, hai zaroori!”

-Manoj Muntashir

A sombre and pensive melody brings up the rear of the album, and it is a sheer delight to the ears. In spite of the song being pensive and slow-paced, it touches your heart in a way that probably no song has, recently. The song has a very beautiful tune, which makes you feel as if you are flying high in the sky. The composition has a very Western classical touch to it, and the arrangements just support the same feeling. The mukhda itself is so hard-hitting, you can’t help but listen further. And that hookline, that’s what can be charged legally for making people go crazy and making them speechless. The antaras carry forward the serious feel of the song perfectly, and it makes for a great listen overall. That bridge line between the antara and hookline is so heartbreaking! The arrangements as I was saying, are amazing. They ooze out grandeur like a leaking pipe. The live strings are so overwhelming (in a positive way), it transports you to a whole different world. You will feel like you are sitting in an Orchestra Hall in Europe. The slow pace is made up for by the grand arrangements, which make sure nobody has the audacity to dismiss this song by calling it boring. Twinkly sounds, heavenly wind instruments and amazing guitars (Joell Mukherjee) in an interlude, constitute the rest of the arrangements. Amaal’s piano notes are amazing, and he plays them like little treats throughout the larger treat that the song is. Prakriti steals the show, and after ‘Bheegh Loon’ (Khamoshiyan), it is her second song where she gets the opportunity to shine by herself. Her graceful, lilting voice in this song is something that I frankly never expected her to pull off, and she has!! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are a spectacular piece of poetry, and it is after such a long time that I’m hearing a sad song that doesn’t go overboard with its sentimentality. I’m ready to be sad for a day, listening to this song on loop! Amaal surpasses his own ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni) with this one!

Rating: 5/5


Noor is a charming album. With just four tracks, it still has the most variety I’ve seen in recent albums. With not song sounding even close to the next, Amaal provides us with a mixed bag, wherein anything you pick out from it, will be a treat to the ears. Barring one. Of course, everything has some flaws. Here, it is the club song. I’m sure Amaal would’ve been better off producing an original club song than remaking an old song! Anyway, the rest of the songs are a breeze of fresh air, something that has dwindled nowadays, what with music makers following some unnecessary clichés that will make their music hit for a week or so. But this album seems like something that will stay on my playlist for sure. ‘Noor’ means ‘light’, and the songs are so light-hearted, so I call this album Amaal’s Noor-aani album!! Bright and light!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 20

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hai Zaroori = Uff Yeh Noor > Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai > Gulabi 2.0 = Gulabi Redux

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 09 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Noor) = 10

Which is your favourite song from Noor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHREYA + SUNIDHI = SHABANA!! (NAAM SHABANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Meet Bros. & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Naam Shabana Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


P.S. The song ‘Dil Hua Besharam’ can be heard on Saavn, while its reprise ‘Baby Besharam’ can be heard on the YouTube audio jukebox. The Saavn link doesn’t have the latter whereas the YouTube jukebox doesn’t have the former. Thought it necessary to inform in case you get confused! 😀


Naam Shabana is a Bollywood thriller, starring Taapsee Pannu in the titular role, and Manoj Bajpayee, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Elli Avram and Taher Shabbir in supporting roles. The film has been directed by Shivam Nair, whose ‘Bhaag Johnny’ flopped in 2015. The film has been produced by Neeraj Pandey and Shital Bhatia. It is a spin-off to the 2015 super-hit film ‘Baby’, and shows the journey of Taapsee Pannu’s character Shabana from ‘Baby’, before she was roped in to be a part of the mission. The movie is definitely awaited, because of it being the first of its kind; Bollywood has been free of any spin-offs as such, and it is just wonderful that the first Bollywood spin-off is that of such a wonderful thriller. Anyway, let’s go over to the music, because we have a little more time to wait for the movie. We all remember that ‘Baby’ had been touted to be a songless film. Nevertheless, three songs had been included in its album — technically two, because one of the songs had a male and female version. Meet Bros. Anjjan had composed one promotional track, while M.M. Kreem, had composed the two-version track in question. The soundtrack was like an accessory to the film, and not something to cherish in your playlist for a long, long time. This movie seems to be different, in that it has four original tracks, with one having two versions, thus making it five songs. Rochak Kohli, who of late, just composed single additional songs that released after the albums of ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’ and ‘Wazir’ released, comes back with a substantial chunk of an album after a long time. He last composed three songs out of the five-track ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’ (which were quite ignorable) and before that, three out of ten in ‘Hawaizaada’ (which I still listen to!) So I am not quite sure what he can give in this album, where he has three out of five songs. The other two songs are two versions of the same song, composed by Meet Bros, without Anjjan. Hopefully, they don’t give something too-hard-to-grasp like ‘Baby’s ‘Beparwah’. So let’s see what kind of music this album to a much-awaited thriller, holds in hand!


1. Rozana

Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Inn aankhon se yeh bataa, kitna main dekhun tujhe,
Reh jaati hai kuchh kami, jitna bhi dekhun tujhe,
Rozana main, sochun yahi,
Ki jee loongi main besaans bhi,
Aise hi tu mujhe, milta rahe agar, rozana, rozana!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rochak decided to start the album off with a mellow, soothing song that would be enough to transport us to dreamland. The first song in the album is a romantic song that has a very beautiful composition; Rochak gets everything right in that he composes this one with the perfect Bollywood ideals of ‘romance’. Each and every note hits your heart and hits hard. The mukhda gives a nice headstart to the song, and the hookline is one which doesn’t care much about imposing itself on you but grows on you like slow poison just as I like it. The antaras hold all the magic of the song; the very powerfully lilting tune of the antaras just leaves you spellbound. The arrangements are quite minimal, but Rochak gives an impressive strings backdrop for most of the song, especially the strings in the interlude are very impressive. Guitars and piano soothe your senses like nothing else can. And also, Rochak has employed a kind of Marching rhythm to the antara. I don’t know why that’s there, but it doesn’t hamper the song in any way. The arrangements provide for a nice nighttime lullabyish listen. And the vocals are by none other than the melody queen, Shreya Ghoshal. She handles each word with utmost care, and the whispery way in which she sings the song proves yet again how wonderful she is as a singer. Unnecessary bouts of loudness can never be found when she is behind the mic. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are mind blowing, especially the paragraph I’ve showcased above! A MINDBLOWING start to the album, and it will definitely consolidate Rochak’s career in Bollywood.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Zinda

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Ziddi raaston se paanv yeh, aaj bhi, jhagadna toh bhoole nahin,
Haare hain kayi dafa toh kya, aaj bhi, hum ladna toh bhoole nahin,
Aaj bhi dil baaghi hai, bas yehi kaafi hai,
Zinda hoon abhi, baaki hoon abhi,
Meri har saans mein thodi si zindagi hai abhi!”

– Manoj Muntashir

After the lulling romantic song, Rochak throws in a motivational kind of song next. This time, the composition is a bit weak. It sounds great in the first listen, but later on I found that it is quite typical and offers nothing new. The mukhda starts off the song on a slow pace, which only speeds up when the hookline arrives: the only portion of the song that remains with you after the song ends. Wonderfully composed on pensive sounding high notes, that part will definitely hook you on to the song and assure that you don’t leave it halfway. The antara that follows is also quite sombre, and doesn’t leave an impact on you, unless you hear it many times. On a whole, the song’s tune has nothing much to lap up. The arrangements also fail to offer anything different or innovative. The tune is already so laidback, but the arrangements refuse to make it more interesting, staying very minimal until, again, the hookline comes. Strings and guitars can be heard, but nothing stands out very boldly. Sunidhi Chauhan provides to the song, everything that the tune and arrangements could not. Her energy, though diffused in the song, manages to make the song repeat-listenable, even if only once or twice. Lately, she seems to have gotten stereotyped to these kind of songs. The lyrics by Muntashir, too, are good in their purpose of being motivational. A motivational song that fails to motivate a lot, but is functional to an extent. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Zubi Zubi

Singers ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rochak Kohli, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Rochak Kohli, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Mere dil, gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi,
Masti mein gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi!”

– Anjaan

Next up we have Rochak’s final song for the album, and it happens to be an upbeat club number. This one is a remake, of Bappi Lahiri-composed ‘Zooby Zooby’ (Dance Dance), and it is quite a decent remake too, at that. The composition, though faltering at the beginning, turns out to be quite catchy. The mukhda is what I have a problem with — it seems forced and a bit childish. But right from the first time the hookline is sung, till the end of the song, it is an enjoyable track! The great thing is that, like it used to happen before, only the hookline of the original song has been taken, while the rest has been composed afresh. The antara is a nice continuation of the sensuous dance song, but then that line from the mukhda, “humko hai jaan se bhi pyaari aashiqmizajiyaan“, comes back to irritate. The arrangements are fantastic discoesque arrangements, recreating the Bappi Lahiri era in today’s style. Rochak has added groovy beats, and that amazing programming effect he has added to his own voice when he sings the hookline, keeps me waiting for his parts to come! It makes him sound like an awesome robot. 😀 Sukriti also, has sung well, except the mukhda. (Again!) She sounded a lot like a fake Shefali Alvares there, and I found it quite irritating, as I would have if Shefali herself had sung it. The rest of the song, she shines. Kumaar reworks around Anjaan’s original hookline, and pens down aptly enjoyable lyrics. A good remake, spoiled by a mediocre first stanza.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Baby Besharam / Dil Hua Besharam

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas & Meet Bros / Aditi Singh Sharma & Meet Bros, Music by ~ Meet Bros, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

(Nothing to showcase, thanks to Kumaar’s lyrical masterpieces which you’ll read of later on in the passage)

The next song is yet another club song, this one by Meet Bros. The composition sticks quite close to Bollywood’s conventions of composing a ‘catchy’ club song. Right from the beginning Meet Bros “try” to get us caught on to the composition, which, unfortunately, is very staid. The mukhda is bad, and the hookline follows suit. The antara doesn’t provide much respite in this respect either. The arrangements are typical club beats, and it sounds like it should’ve released a year or two ago. Meet Bros have added this weird synthesiser tune, which sounds like the song is part of a comedy movie, an adult comedy to be precise. I wonder if this song was actually composed for some other movie before, and then moved over to ‘Naam Shabana’ Because it couldn’t find a place anywhere else. The vocals are what differentiate one version of the song from the other. It actually had released first in Jasmine’s voice, and that one is outright banal, sounding like it is trying to imitate ‘Yaar Na Miley’ (Kick). Aditi Singh Sharma, though not eligible to win a Best Singer prize or anything for her rendition, provides respite MERELY IN COMPARISON TO Jasmine Sandlas. At least her voice is more club-environment-friendly. Yes, she does spoil some lines with her unnecessarily stylish accent. Oh yeah, and she knows how to pronounce the “Baby” as “Bebe” (which you need to practise if you ever want to make it big in Bollywood as a club singer!), as opposed to Jasmine singing “Baby” as “Bebi”. The way they sing “beyyyyyysharam” is quite torturous. I guess it was first going to be included in ‘Besharam’ as the title track (that would explain the comedic arrangements), until Ishq Bector & Shree D saved us by stepping in. Kumaar’s lyrics feature lyrical masterpieces like “Rafaa dafaa sufi bandon ko karke nasha vasha karlo“, and “Thoda sa bigadne mein bolo na kya harz hai?“. *Slow claps*

Rating: 1/5 for Baby Besharam, 1.5/5 for Dil Hua Besharam


Naam Shabana is a decent album, but not great. Its predecessor had two songs, so it was okay that only one worked. This has four songs, out of which only one works perfectly, the others are decent, and one is bad. For a thriller, the album is apt, with a romantic song, a motivational song, and two situational club songs. However, it will have less of a connect with the audiences. Rochak has done a commendable job though! The only good thing I might remember about this album years later is that it has both Shreya and Sunidhi, modern stalwarts of the Bollywood music industry, lending their voices to the songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 1.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rozana > Zubi Zubi = Zinda > Dil Hua Besharam > Baby Besharam

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Naam Shabana) = 09

 

Which is your favourite song from Naam Shabana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SAB JEETE YAHAAN, HAIN RUSTOM YEHI!! (RUSTOM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Raghav Sachar, Ankit Tiwari & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Mandar Cholkar & Arko Pravo Mukherjee
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th August 2016

Rustom Album Cover

Rustom Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Rustom is an upcoming Bollywood mystery/drama film starting Akshay Kumar, Ileana D’Cruz, Esha Gupta and Arjan Bajwa. The movie is directed by ‘1920 London’ director Tinu Suresh Desai, and produced by Neeraj Pandey, Aruna Bhatia, Nittin Keni, Akash Chawla, Virender Arora, Ishwar Kapoor and Shital Bhatia. The film is based of the life of Naval Officer K.M. Nanavati. The film has a pretty long 10-track album, with four composers working together to make it so big. The first of these four is Arko Pravo Mukherjee, a composer whose heartbreaking as well as heat-touching song ‘Saathi Rey’ from ‘Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)’ is still on my playlist, being the wonderfully sweet and emotional song that it is. Arko has two songs in the album, of which the second is actually a reprise of the first. Next up on the composers list is Raghav Sachar, who has been out of the picture for quite some time; I remember his last outing as a remake of a pop song in ‘Alone’, in which he didn’t quite impress. Here, he has been given charge of four songs, out of which two are versions of the first, and the fourth is the instrumental of that. 😂 Hopefully, these versions are entertaining songs!! Third on the list, is Ankit Tiwari, who surprisingly hasn’t disappointed completely this year, though going into déjà vu mode, but not giving too bad songs. His last song happens to be ‘Ishqe Di Lat’ (Junooniyat) which I loved loved loved. So hopefully, his two songs in the album are just as GREAT! Last is the most experienced of the lot, Jeet Gannguli, who let us down with one of his two songs in his last outing, ‘Junooniyat’, but hopefully, his two songs here are just as lovely as that one was disappointing! 😀 So, with verrrrry high hopes, let’s start off the analysis of the ‘Rustom’ album!!


1. Tere Sang Yaara / Tere Bin Yaara (Reprise)
Singers ~ Atif Aslam / Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir / Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Arko gets to open the album, with a calm and dulcet, and endearing, though templatised melody. We’ve seen what a great combination Arko and Akshay Kumar have made in the past with that unforgettable song, ‘Meherbaani’ (The Shaukeens). This time too, Arko weaves magic with a wonderful melody, one that definitely isn’t something innovative or something we haven’t heard before, but still, is so sweet and lovable, that you just feel wonderful and fresh. The composition is not so complicated, as Arko has kept it sweet and simple — which is his speciality. It starts off with Atif singing a calm couplet, which paves way for the actual melody, a tune carried high by its pillars of simplicity. The mukhda hooks you instantly, and you can feel the romance infused into it. The innocence of the song is in the tune. The antara is quite well-composed too, having all the qualities of a good antara — maintained continuity, catchiness and of course something that makes you want to hear it again and again. In the original version ‘Tere Sang Yaara’, Arko has orchestrated it with wonderful violins and guitars too, but the highlight is of course, the piano, something that is a key part of Arko’s arrangements. The flute soothes you too, while the digital beats sound quite templatised, but nevertheless, work in favourite of the song. In the reprise, ‘Tere Bin Yaara’, Arko cranks the arrangements down, making them hit you with a less force. The arrangements are mostly the same, just that they are less prominent, and the beats do not stand out as much, and especially the hookline has been unplugged-ised. This version too, is a calming and soothing version, almost equal to the original. The vocals in the first version, by Atif are beautiful and a very important part in making the song sound so good. Arko, however, with his less-polished vocals, steals your heart away anyway, in his reprise version. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics for the first version are good as well, though a bit templatised, and have been adapted by Arko very well, for the reprise version. Overall, the song is a great start to the album. In all its simplicity and innocence, it is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Rustom Vahi / Rustom Vahi (Theme) / Rustom Vahi (Marathi Version) / Rustom Vahi (Male Version)
Singers ~ Sukriti Kakkar / (Instrumental) / Jasraj Joshi / Jasraj Joshi, Music by ~ Raghav Sachar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir / (Instrumental) / Mandar Cholkar / Manoj Muntashir

Raghav Sachar presents the next song of the album, in not less than four versions! We’ve heard Pritam giving four versions of ‘Afghan Jalebi’ in his album to ‘Phantom’, and now Raghav Sachar follows with the title song of ‘Rustom’, in as many as four versions! Of course, excited as I was to check them out, I did wonder if they were all necessary! 😀 Anyway, that comes later. First, the review. So Raghav has composed an awesome, hard-hitting, theme song, with mysterious undertones, resembling the 80s era wonderfully. The jazz/disco touch has been given wonderfully. The composition actually hooks you onto the song. It is sweetness delivered in a sinister package. The composition seems sweet, but has dark hints scattered throughout. Especially the line “Pyaar toh pyaar hai, chaahe jaise mile”, is wonderfully mysterious. Songs from movies like ‘Don’ (the old one) and ‘Shaan’, instantly come back to you a after hearing this one, and you can just imagine an Asha Bhosle or an Usha Uthup crooning it in those days, while Parveen Babi gyrates to it. A very similar infectiousness is spread all over the song. Raghav makes sure we the listeners, have the best possible experience while listening to it, as he tries to recreate the 80s. (Though the film is set in the 60s. 😛 But who cares!) The arrangements help the song throw us back into that era. The saxophone being the highlight of the song, has been played very energetically and it is so catchy! Techno beats, like disco, work to make the song sound actually retro. Occasional piano and the unceasing drums just infuse more energy into the song. And now, coming to the vocals. In the main female version, Sukriti manages to bring in that sinister undertone in her voice, and hits the bullseye with all the notes that jump frantically here and there. In the Marathi version and Male version, Jasraj Joshi infuses just as much energy, but the song doesn’t sound as good in a male voice as it does in a female voice! Personally, I feel that the Marathi version was unnecessary, and it must’ve been added to increase the reach of the movie! (By the way, how can you INCREASE the reach of an Akshay Kumaar movie!???!!) The arrangements of the Marathi and Male versions are exactly the same, while the theme is a very short piece of music — but with a very spunky arrangement. The lyrics of the song have been penned well by Manoj Muntashir, describing the shady character very well, while Mandar Cholkar seems to falter a bit with the Marathi lyrics — they seem pretty forced! An electrifying title track, and a very commendable job by Raghav Sachar! Kudos to Sukriti for mastering the vocals!! Her version is definitely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tay Hai
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

A melodic piano piece very dulcetly lures you into the other song. After the energizing title song, the song comes as a pleasant surprise. The piano gives way to Ankit’s voice, who surprisingly sounds the very least bit autotuned in this song! The soulfulness of it all just shocked me. As I have been liking/loving Ankit’s songs throughout the year, this one really doesn’t surprise me much, but nevertheless, I’m blown away by the majestic and opulent orchestration, composition and great vocals. The composition by Ankit is so deep and layered and touching, that it barely takes seconds for it to work its magic on you. The mukhda opens up quite like any other Ankit Tiwari song, but it is when the first time the “Maujood hai…” hook plays, that you can gauge the magnificence and grandeur of it all. The antara has been composed just as wonderfully, with Tiwari minding to use contrasting low notes. Contrasting because the hook was oh-so-high-pitched. And the tune of the low notes, is just so dazzling! It sounds like a Rahman antara, in fact! The next bewitching thing about the song, are the arrangements! Sumptuous as they sound, they make you feel very simple, happy and just plain good! Especially in the hookline, those wonderful strings are tooooooooo grand to keep away the goosebumps. Tiwari even uses drums, something that sounds odd in such a song, but here, works in its favour! And then there’s the wonderful arrangement in the antara, devoid of any instruments except a wonderful piano that plays around the words so cutely. There’s a great digital beat supporting the tune as well, which is what makes it sound oh-so-Rahmanish! Ankit’s voice is very enchanting, and is one of the main reasons the song has turned out so hauntingly beautiful. Manoj Muntashir also, writes beautiful lyrics, complementing the enchanting composition very well. A spectacular song composed and sung by Ankit, with the arrangements playing a vital role in propelling it so much! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Dekha Hazaro Dafaa
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Jeet Gannguli steps into the album next, with a cute and lovely little waltz. The composer has got everything right with this one, right from the ballroom waltz-y composition, that sounds so retro and lovable, to the arrangements, that are bliss to the music lover. Firstly, the composition. It is something that instantly makes you love it. There is no intermediate step. You either hate it (which you won’t!) or love love love it. And I love love loved it. Right from the first time I heard it, the simple yet grand tune won my heart over, and couldn’t leave my head thereafter. The mukhda is scintillatingly calming and charming, while the antara is beautifully structured to keep the charm intact. While hearing the song, I actually thought that if ‘Cinderella’ were to be remade in Hindi, this song would be perfect. Jeet has wonderfully brought in the ballroom melody and makes the song sound so innocent and sweet. The arrangements are beautiful too, with the strings doing their job right from the beginning. The way the low and high strings alternate with each other, is something worth noticing, and also something that is likely to be missed. The flute adds to the sugar and dreamy ambience. In the antara, after the first line, Jeet has put this EXTRAORDINARY violin solo, which is soooooo charming! The way it has been played, briskly, is what makes it sound so charming! (Hear it at 1:20 or 2:27 in the song, don’t thank me later! 😉 ) The chimes and the very European-ish choir add to the ballroom ambience. Of course, a ballroom song is incomplete without the piano, and Jeet makes sure the piano makes some appearance in the song, too. All in all, the orchestration is as dreamy and angelic as it can get. Ever. I mean, the last time I heard such opulent and magnificent ballroom orchestration was in ‘Nazdeekiyan’ (Shaandaar), which was a gem! On the vocals front, Arijit with his calm voice sounds so sweet and innocent, while Palak complement beautifully. Though at first, Palak seems an odd choice, it all fits in perfectly after a couple of listens. Manoj’s lyrics are so sweet, that if you sum the sweetness of the song all up, the chances of getting diabetes are as high as the Burj Khalifa! Of course, such a sweet song can be no less than a 5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Dhal Jaun Main
Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Aakanksha Sharma, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Now it’s time for the sad song of the album. Jeet Gannguli, an expert at sad songs in my opinion, gets to helm it. However, the song turns out to be a great disappointment. Jeet resorts to his usual Vishesh Films-ish template to convey the sadness. The composition is typical Jeet Gannguli, with a strong Vishesh Films undertone to it. Right from the beginning, you feel that either you have accidentally started playing the ‘Raaz 28362’ (and I won’t be surprised if so many ‘Raaz’ films do get made!) album, instead of ‘Rustom’. The hookline is the typical melodrama we get to hear in Bhatt films. And there I am, in a pickle, trying to understand where the Bhatts came into the 1960s. The arrangements are digital beats mostly, and do not really stand out much. Jubin’s vocals a quite good, and give you a reason to hear the song, while Aakanksha sounds strictly forced at places and cute at places. Jubin basically carries the song on his shoulders, a song which is otherwise a yawn fest for me! Manoj’s lyrics too, stick to the conventions of modern Bollywood. After the four good and suitable songs, here comes an oddball that brothers fits here, nor is catchy or exciting. Even if it were in ‘Raaz 28362’, I wouldn’t have liked it!

 

6. Jab Tum Hote Ho
Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit Tiwari gets to close the album, and after that majestic song of his, all I expected was an even better song. Imagine my happiness when I get to know the song has been sung by none other than today’s nightingale Shreya Ghoshal. Naturally, my heart jumped with joy. And Ankit, with a tranquilizing and pacifying composition, satiates my desire for a great song. His composition, yet again, is very emotional and layered, with shades difficult to unravel right away. The hookline is very, very calm, as is the rest of the song. In this song, the sadness and emotion actually works, unlike the hollow emotion of the previous song. Ankit masters the composition, which is very slow-paced, but keeps you listening. (If you’re a lover of calm music, that is) The calming notes really touch your heart and make you feel loved and cared. Coming to the arrangements, they are pretty minimal, until the interlude. The initial part of the song is graced by piano, strings and acoustic guitars, out of which each excels in its place, particularly the piano. The interlude brings with it, a wonderful blend of strings of different kinds, producing a wonderful symphonic ambience. The second stanza is more accentuated with strings and the guitars are louder too. It is so beautiful how the arrangements open up towards the end, just as the singer does. And that brings us to the vocals. When it is Shreya Ghoshal, it is highly impossible for vocals to go wrong, and here too, it is displayed very beautifully. Even though the composition is so slow and the arrangements minimal, her voice makes you get hooked to the song. She sings each note with a certain innocence and beauty. Manoj’s lyrics are touching, and the song gets raised higher due to them. Ankit weaves even more magic with his second song, and Shreya helps us end the album on a very calm and emotional note. #5StarHotelSong!!


Rustom is yet another example of a mulicomposer album done right. Here, four composers come together to make an album that seems very fulfilling as a whole. Yes, there are some glitches as well, in that the makers seem to have crammed too many unnecessary versions of the good songs into the album, and also tried to increase the taker count of the album by adding a modernized number that just doesn’t work. However, the songs that go with the theme of the movie, perform really well and help in making the album a success. The surprise package is Ankit, who stuns with his two glorious songs, songs that I would never forget. However, the winner is our very own Jeet who makes a song that is so sugar-coatedly sweet, that if it had to be sold as a toffee, the whole world would have got diabetes. All in all, ‘Rustom’ is an album that is going to stay with you for quite some time! I would say “sab jeete yahaan, hain ‘Rustom’ yehi”!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dekha Hazaro Dafaa > Tay Hai > Tere Sang Yaara > Jab Tum Hote Ho > Rustom Vahi > Tere Bin Yaara (Reprise) > Rustom Vahi (Male Version) > Rustom Vahi (Theme) > Rustom Vahi (Marathi Version) > Dhal Jaun Main

 

Which is your favourite song from Rustom? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂