REMAKE-GIRI, BAHUT HUI, THAK GAYI HAI ABB JANTA!! (LUKA CHUPPI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, White Noise Studios, Abhijit Vaghani, Tony Kakkar, Goldboy, Dilip Sen, Sameer Sen, Gurmeet Singh & Bob
♪ Lyrics by: White Noise Studios, Anand Bakshi, Nirmaan, Tony Kakkar, Mellow D, Harmanjit, Kunaal Vermaa & Raja
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd February 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 1st March 2019

Luka Chuppi Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Luka Chuppi is a Bollywood film starring Kriti Sanon, Kartik Aaryan, Pankaj Tripathi, Aparshakti Khurrana, and Vinay Pathak. The film is the directorial debut of Laxman Utekar, and is produced by Dinesh Vijan. The film is a social comedy revolving around a couple who decide to enter a live-in relationship, and the problems they face from their relatives and the society in general. The music from Maddock’s productions has usually been good, though there was a slight dip in the quality of the music in Sachin-Jigar’s album to ‘Stree’. Well, here, the music is credited to multiple composers, including Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture White Noise Productions, last heard in ‘Laaj Sharam’ (Veere Di Wedding), Abhijit Vaghani, and the lead ‘composer’ (read remake artist) Tanishk Bagchi. I just call him the lead remake artist, because the other two composers, too, have presented recreations, and coupled with Bagchi’s three remakes, that makes this album full of remakes. So basically, my review is going to be like a race where remakes are pitted against each other: knowing fully well that they have almost zero chance to cross the finish line.


Right from the beginning of the opening track of the album, Poster Lagwa Do, the Sachin-Jigar vibes hit you square in the face. The beats, distinctively similar to those of ‘Johny Johny’ (Entertainment) give away that this song has been worked upon by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R company, White Noise Productions (though i suspect it has been ghost programmed by the duo themselves, because of their close association to Dinesh Vijan). Anyway, the song, which is a remake of Dilip-Sameer’s ‘Yeh Khabar Chapwa Do Akhbaar Mein’ (Aflatoon), rides on the success of ‘Simmba’s ‘Aankh Marey’, in that the makers rope in Mika Singh to do the honours with the male vocals. Well, it doesn’t work half as well as it did in the former song, and another reason for that may be because the female singer there was a more effervescent Neha Kakkar as opposed to an amateur-sounding Sunanda Sharma here. One of the singers who I’d actually like to see the female portions of the song to have been sung by, though, is Nikhita Gandhi, who is instead relegated to an embarrassing two lines of rap that are easy to miss! The composition, though kept intact, gets new lyrics for the antara, and the lyrics have been credited to White Noise Studios too — I wish Sachin-Jigar would follow Pritam’s JAM8 when it comes to crediting individual artists (though their lack of individual credits just makes me believe stronger in my theory that they are the men behind all the music credited to White Noise and just don’t want to be named because of the album being a multicomposers album!) That said, the song is levels below any previous Sachin-Jigar presentation; the beats are dated, there’s no originality or innovativeness in the programming and the song ultimately lacks appeal and repeat value.
The other ‘guest’ composer, Abhijit Vaghani, presents his take on Akhil’s song ‘Khaab’, originally composed by Bob. Duniyaa is a pleasant recreation of the already present original romantic song, with completely different lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, replacing Raja’s lyrics from the original. The new lyrics are sweet, and the new composition for the antara too, is appreciated. Akhil has been roped in to sing this version as well, which is a good choice, as the singer of the original also gets his Bollywood break in the bargain. Dhvani Bhanushali sings the female portions alongside him, and does quite a good job too; she sounds much better in low notes here (though clearly autotuned), than she does in high notes in songs like the recently released T-Series pop single ‘Main Teri Hoon’ by Sachin-Jigar. The flute is quite melodious, and is one of the features taken from the original. Thankfully, the beats of the original, which were quite passable, have been changed and made to sound a bit more melodious, with guitars and strings accompanying the composition.
Tanishk Bagchi, who ‘composes’, or ‘recreates’ the next three songs of the album, starts off with Coca Cola, a funky and more glitzy touch to the original by Tony Kakkar. Of course, Neha Kakkar gets to pitch in, and while her brother’s original composition’s tempo is cranked up quite considerably, she gets to sing a new antara, which seems to end as soon as it starts. Again, the choice of retaining the original singer’s voice is a commendable move. Tanishk’s programming saves the song; it’s uptempo beat and strings make it a fun one-time listen — unfortunately, it is not so fun that I would press the repeat button. There is that infectious digital beat that starts the song off though, and it thankfully plays for quite some times for those who loved it. To Tony Kakkar’s original lyrics are added some new lines by Mellow D — the lines sung by Neha Kakkar and the rap by Young Desi. Obviously enough, this is going to be the next club anthem though, for lack of anything better these days.
Tanishk goes on to present another love song, named Photo, this one being a remake of Karan Sehmbi’s ‘Photo’, composed by Gold Boy. Again, the singer is retained, and again, I commend that decision. Tanishk’s beats are really basic though, and provide nothing new to the original song — which was already sufficiently catchy if this was supposed to be catchier. The flute is a nice attraction, but the original had guitars, which I am missing here. The short length of the song keeps it thankfully not boring, but the repetitive composition by Gold Boy would not have been so pleasant if it had gone on for longer. The singer Karan Sehmbi has a nice folksy texture to his voice, which explains why T-Series backed him for a pop single, and agreed to let him sing its remake, which wasn’t the case three years ago when ‘Soch Na Sake’ (Airlift) was sung by Arijit Singh. Nirmaan’s lyrics are cute, with the lyricist also throwing in a clever self-reference in the second verse. A melodious song, but loses appeal because of the digital beats, which makes it sound more like a pop song than a film song.
The last song, Tu Laung Main Elaachi, a remake of ‘Laung Laachi’s title track by Gurmeet Singh, is probably my least favourite of the album. And there are quite a few reasons for that. First of all, a really sweet Punjabi song sung by a really good Punjabi singer, Mannat Noor, has been redubbed by Tulsi Kumar — the first bad choice. Second, the beats have been degraded in sound; there is no freshness in the song as one should expect from a recreation. It sounds like the song has just been recreated for the sake of doing so. The chorus singers at the beginning and the end are nothing short of irritating! The bass has been increased in the recreation, though, it seems, and wow, I’m sure that required a lot of effort! :/


Luka Chuppi is the result of the remake trend in Bollywood going far overboard. I am not sure how the makers always come up with stupid reasons to justify their including remakes in their albums, but I’m sure nothing can justify completely avoiding original music in your album! Atleast for the sake of art, and music in general, if they would have planned out the music of this album less hastily, maybe it would have been better. And it isn’t like these remakes are great, either! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 = 32

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Duniyaa > Coca Cola > Photo = Poster Lagwa Do > Tu Laung Main Elaachi

Which is your favourite song from Luka Chuppi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NAWABS THAT PARTY AND DANCE IN CLUBS..? (NAWABZAADE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gurinder Seagal, Guru Randhawa & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Kunaal Vermaa, Ikka, Kumaar, Sandeep Nath & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th July 20181400x1400bb2

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Nawabzaade is an upcoming comedy film starring Raghav Juyal, Dharmesh Yelande, Punit J. Pathak and Isha Rikhi. The film is directed by Jayesh Pradhan and produced by Lizelle D’Souza and Mayur K Barot. The music for the film is composed by Guru Randhawa, Gurinder Seagal and Badshah. I don’t really expect much from the album, looking at the composer names, and I’ll be honest: I’m reviewing it so I don’t have to have only two big albums, Dhadak and Soorma competing in the monthly awards. 😅 So let’s see what entails…


Guru Randhawa continues his spree of rehashing his pop sinhles under T-Series, into Bollywood club tracks; he also continues making the Bollywood variants sound fresher and less raw than the pop songs — giving them a more polished sound. High Rated Gabru is propelled by the two special appearances by Varun Dhawan and Shraddha Kapoor, though. The song is your typical Guru Randhawa EDM number that attracts you at first, but wears off with further listens. As for me, it hasn’t worn off yet though, so I guess this is one of the stronger ones. I like the drum beats Guru has put in occasionally, and the club sound still sounds fresh, so I guess he still has the audience grooving. The Female Version is even more unnecessary than having ice cream in December. Aditi Singh Sharma’s over-stylised vocals seem to say “Remember me? I haven’t got a song in Bollywood for a long time, but I still can’t sing in a normal voice.” The Punjabi reprise of the lyrics just sounds odd. The programming in this version isn’t as fresh and bubbly as in the male version, so it’s bound to get less takers.

Badshah too, is made to rehash his tried-and-tested formula, with a steady beat running throughout the song, Tere Naal Nachna is adorned with noises like an Indian auntyji going “Hainn?” The bass line though, is really addictive, and the hookline by newcomer (?) Sunanda Sharma is irresistible. Badshah has the most catchy female singer portions in his songs! Looks like after Aastha Gill, he is now introducing another quirky singer. The lyrics are the usual Badshah rap stuff, while vodka makes a cameo in the hookline, as always.

Lead composer Gurinder Seagal gets three songs to his credit: he doesn’t make much of the opportunity, though. Amma Dekh is a pacy dubstep number that should have been released two or three years ago. Sukriti Kakar awkwardly tries to sing like Neeti Mohan, while Ikka provides a banal rap portion. Gurinder does give it a cool sound though, with a variety of sound effects used throughout the song. Kumaar’s lyrics are nothing except for Sameer’s hookline from the song ‘Amma Dekh’ (Stuntsman).

If that was cringeworthy though, what awaits you in Mummy Kasam will have you wincing in terror. The staid-by-now Bollywood kuthu rhythm has been given a tedious presentation here, with cringeworthy lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, and weird vocals by Gurinder Seagal. Ikka presents an even worse rap in this song than he did in the former. Payal Dev tries to sound like Neha Kakkar, and obviously fails. Too loud for my liking.

The only song where Gurinder remotely proves that he can compose, and not just program, is Lagi Hawa Dil Ko, which just happens to be the best song of the album because all the others are nowhere near it. It sounds refreshing to get a normal, romantic melody after so much noise, and my brain felt glad to get to process something for once. Altamash Faridi leads the vocals wonderfully, while others like Gurinder Singh, Shivay Vyas, Nettle and even Mika Singh in a short energetic departure from the romantic tune, complement him well. The reason this song stands out from the others is that it has variety. The arrangements are pleasant — guitars, harmonica, tablas, even, in a short Qawwali portion, drums, trumpets and rock guitars in a rock-and-roll portion, this song has a wide range. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics are nothing great, but more of better-than-the-rest.


Except for one experimental song, this album is mainly going to be heard and forgotten. In fact, I can’t even guarantee that the experimental song won’t be forgotten!!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 3 + 7.5 = 34.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Lagi Hawa Dil Ko > Tere Naal Nachna > High Rated Gabru > High Rated Gabru (Female) > Amma Dekh > Mummy Kasam

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 27 (from previous albums) + 02 = 29

Which is your favourite song from Nawabzaade? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 😊