DECEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP (FUKREY RETURNS, FIRANGI, TERA INTEZAAR & MONSOON SHOOTOUT – Mini Music Reviews)

It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.


♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.


Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44


♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!


A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya



♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.


This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil



♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.


An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay



Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!

CATCHY TUNES IN A COVER OF EARTH!! (ANAARKALI OF AARAH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rohit Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Ramkumar Singh, Ravinder Randhawa, Prashant Ingole, Dr. Sagar & Avinash Das
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 6th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th March 2017

Anaarkali of Aarah Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Anaarkali Of Aarah is a Bollywood film starring Swara Bhaskar, Pankaj Tripathi and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film has been directed by Avinash Das, and produced by Sandiip Kapur. The film is about a singer in Bihar who earns a living by singing songs at village functions. As she gets entangled into a spat with the Vice Chancellor of a prestigious university, she seeks justice, and the movie is about her struggle for justice. The movie has opened to great reviews, but as usual, my writing speed has fallen behind, and so here I am. The music for the movie has been composed by Rohit Sharma, who is NOT a cricketer; you can find him over at @rohitdecomposer on Twitter. He has composed for a music album for a movie I was aware of, but didnt pay much attention to, Jimmy Sheirgill’s ‘Shortcut Safaari’, but now he comes with a definitely bigger album, and with ten tracks it is definite that the music will be completely situational and plot-oriented, which is to say, it will be quite rustic and earthy. Is it a problem for me? No! As long it is catchy, I will like anything! 😀 So let’s dive into this ten-track album!


1. Dunaliya Mein Jung (Anaarkali’s Umph)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

The album starts with a song alternatively called “Anaarkali’s Umph”, which is probably a misspelled version of ‘oomph’, but I get the point. Anyway, the song is clearly for one of Anaarkali’s performances, and as soon as it starts, you get the situational feel of it radiating out of it. The composition is quite toned-down, with not much by way of catchiness, but goes on quite a clichéd route. I’m sure if you go to Aarah itself, this is the kind of folk songs you will hear. So it was a smart move to keep it simple. The tune does make you dance like crazy later on, but one problem is its duration. Over five minutes, the song is quite daunting to sit through because of its monotony. The arrangements are aptly folksy. The bulbultarang (let’s call it the ‘Indian banjo’ henceforth in the review because it is a common instrument in the songs and I’m too lazy to add the italics effect.) has been used gratuitously, as is the harmonium, and very aptly too, because it replicates the folk performances of the region. Swati Sharrma sounds very different from what she usually sounds like in songs, and it is nice to hear her powerful vocals yet again after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), after which she hardly got any substantial songs. Again, she seems mellowed down in some places, and you wonder how the song is supposed to be so ‘oomphy’ because Bollywood has seen much more oomph that this. Maybe it is because of Ramkumar’s lyrics, which aren’t really creative. A decent start to the album; not-so-oomphy, but catchy to an extent.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Lahanga Jhaanke (Accidental Firing)

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Now this song is alternatively titled ‘Accidental Firing’ and I wonder what that means, unless there’s some situation in the movie. The song starts abruptly with the nice pungi/shehnai sound followed by the Indian banjo played in a very catchy tune. The composition for this one is quite more ‘oomphy’ than the last song, and you instantly get caught on to the rhythm, especially the percussion which has been done wonderfully! The composition is quite sultry and catchy, and the various twists in it really help propel it forward. The “sarak sarak sarakaile” hook is catchy. The antara takes a different route than the rest of the song, and the percussion changes very nicely; the seamless transition from one rhythm to another is a marvel to behold in this song. From rapid, it goes to slow and sultry, just to go back to rapid in a while. I think I’ve given enough away about the arrangements, so now about the vocals. Indu Sonali, a Bhojpuri singer, is an apt singer for the song and her nuances give the song an interesting touch, fun to listen. The lyrics here too are quite the same as the previous track, and I think it’s going to go on like this till the end of the album. A catchier song, that excels especially in arrangements.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Aye Sakhi Ooh (Keh Mukri)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

Next up comes the ‘keh mukri‘, which is basically a song where a lady describes qualities that sound like she’s praising her lover, and then denies it and says that she is talking about something else. We heard it in ‘Raanjhanaa’ too, if you remember! 🙂 This one is more sensual however, than that one, which seemed as sanctimonious as sanctimonious can get. The composition is, relevantly to the theme of the movie, quite sultry and sensual. The mukhda gives a perfect start to the song, while the antaras just continue it, and the hookline does its job. The arrangements are similar to the previous song, with a lot of amazing percussion consisting of dholaks and tablas. The Indian Banjo works its way amazingly throughout the upbeat song. Pawni Pandey’s vocals here sound very impressive, and not fake like they did in ‘Laila Main Laila’ (Raees). Rohit Sharma has also very interestingly tweaked her voice pitch in some places, providing a comic touch in those places. The backing vocalists efficiently do their job as men who are smitten by Anaarkali. Lyrics are the same. 😀 I should tell you though, that it isn’t like I was expecting better lyrics; it is perfectly fine here given the movie’s theme! Another catchy one!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Thumri)

Singer ~ Rekha Bhardwaj, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Next up we have a thumri, and who better than Rekha Bhardwaj to pull it off!? So Rohit treats us with an aptly folksy, earthy and rustic Thumri, that, at the same time, pulls at our heartstrings. The composition is so beautiful, and has a very heavy old-world-charm to it. The melancholic notes hit the right part of your heart, and instantly. The mukhda has been composed on the common kaherwa taal, while, quite interestingly, the antara has been composed on the three-beat dadra. And the transition between the two different taals, which are individually so commonly (or were so commonly) used in Bollywood songs, is so seamless! It brings you shivering with goosebumps everytime that transition occurs. That brings us to arrangements. Of course, these taals have been played marvellously on the tablas. However, he interludes are something to watch out for, where the sitar will transport you back to Naushad’s music in ‘Mughal-e-Azam’. A wonderful sarangi interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. The harmonium gives a very light background music, and if you are listening carefully, you might catch it. Rekha Bhardwaj pulls off the thumri, with as much finesse as she always does. Nobody on today’s list of singers (and active singers) could’ve replicated what she did in this song. Her nuances are to die for, while the rest of the song, she carries with an aura of power and yet, sounds very simple. Here, the lyrics by Ravinder Randhawa are wonderful. A strong and powerful thumri that needs to be promoted!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Mann Beqaid Huva (Anaarkali’s Adieu)

Singer ~ Sonu Nigam, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

A guitar strum which starts off the next song, immediately tells you that it is quite different from he other songs of the album! And sure enough, this one is quite different in theme and therefore stands out. It has very little by way of earthiness, but there definitely is a gentle caressing breeze in the song. The breeziness can be credited to Sharma’s sweet composition. I was reminded of Anu Malik’s and Sonu Nigam’s collaborations in the 90s and early 2000s by this song. The line before the hookline, and the hookline itself, are so calming, and accentuated by the ravishing instrumentation. Usually such songs have very little in terms of orchestration, but this one is backed by a heavy strings orchestra, wonderful sarangi and if course, the acoustic guitar. Still, wonderful percussion of tablas can be heard in a line hat goes marvellously high-pitched in the antaras. Shakers too, are scintillating additions to the arrangements. Sonu Nigam carries the song with a charming aura, and his old songs are brought to mind instantly; not the middling compositions he had started singing in the middle. This song could have easily fit into a rom-com set in a rural region, and had it had some more urban arrangements, it could have also passed in an urban love story, and that’s why it becomes the odd one out in the album! Prashant Ingole (after a long time) writes marvellous, poetic lyrics, and it is a pleasure to hear him after a long time! Charming!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar (Anaarkali in Studio)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Dr. Sagar

This song starts with a kind of sher, in Bhojpuri, and proceeds to form a rather staid melody, which only sounds impressive occasionally. The composition is not so innovative, and could’ve been better, if not excellent. The whole thing sounds very heard-before and hence, fails to raise eyebrows. The antara doesn’t make things quite better, and is quite dull. The only thing that can pass as catchy, might be the hookline. The arrangements take the form of heard-before Qawwali arrangements, the harmonium leading the way with dholaks following. The Indian banjo too, has been utilised in a very clichéd way. Swati Sharrma doesn’t sound as good as she sounded in her previous song, but still sounds better than all her other songs in other albums. The lyrics are cute, but you hardly have the scope to notice them, as the song won’t compel you to hear it again! A staid melody ruins everything.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Sa Ra Ra Ra (Anaarkali’s Revenge)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

This track seems to be a crucial scene from the film, included in the music album. And it is a Reprise of “Lahanga Jhaanke”. The differences between the two songs are plenty though. This one aptly starts with dialogues, probably as they are from the movie. And it gives a better setting to the song, than the abruptly starting ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’. The premise of the song, we can easily gauge, thanks to the dialogue parts by the emcee of the event and Swara Bhaskar as Anaarkali. The composition, atleast for the first half of the seven-and-a-half minute long song, is the same as ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’ song, but the actual ‘Sa Ra Ra Ra’ part starts four minutes into the song, after a cutting outburst by Anaarkali at a particular man in the audience. And that part is savage! The tune is apt as ut sticks to the whole ‘revenge’ theme, and has a quite sinister feel. Rohit Sharma has added better arrangements in this version, than he did in the original. It is basically the same, but a wonderful backing chorus makes up for whatever void was left unfilled in the first version. In the new portion, booming percussion helps the Anaarkali’s anger come out even better, with the chorus supporting her very well. Strings work well to intensify that portion of the song, while Swara’s dialogues really work in favour of the revenge theme; of course, the great actress that she is, she has rendered the dialogues veryyyyy convincingly! The vocals by Pawni Pandey are very impressive! This is one of Pawni’s best performances, and she just infuses a lot of power into the rendition. The lyrics are well-written, and so are the dialogues. A nice song to go with the revenge situation!

Rating: 4/5

 

8. Mera Balam Bambaiya (Rehearsal Song) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The next three songs have been titled as “Bonus Songs”, probably because they aren’t in the film, and if you notice, they haven’t been mixed, mastered and developed further than a mere scratch version. The songs do sound like scratch versions, and the makers seemed to have included them in the album just for the music lovers. Anyway, this particular song has a nice and catchy tune, another folksy tune that grips you instantly. It is a short song, and again, sounds like a scratch version, as is evident from the minimal arrangements, which makes the song sound raw. However, it doesn’t take anything from the song. Rohit’s composition nevertheless, is very catchy. The hookline is something everybody would enjoy at first listen itself. The arrangements, though minimal, with mainly a harmonium and tablas/dholaks, are enjoyable, giving a feeling as if you are actually at an event in a village, and the song is being sung there by the villagers. Pawni yet again, aces the vocals, sounding as fun as ever. She seems to be enjoying herself, and Rohit Sharma himself (I believe) accompanies her in some parts. The lyrics are functional, situational again. A catchy one, which is not hampered by the raw sound — I wonder why they didn’t develop it further!

Rating: 4/5

 

9. Hamre Jobna Pe (Anaarkali’s Swag) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The second “Bonus Song” has more of a generic tune, heard-before, and not-too-catchy either. The composition sounds quite like “Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar” in many parts; maybe this was its precursor, and not finalised. Again, it is very short, and hasn’t been developed further than a stanza. There’s not much to say about the composition, so talking about the arrangements, I must say that the synthetic sounds added to it actually make it sound like a Bhojpuri film song. And the dholaks and harmonium lead the arrangements here too. Indu Sonali sings the song aptly, in her husky voice. The lyrics are something I didnt quite understand for the most. Middling.

Rating: 2/5

 

10. Laal Laal Cheekwa (Anwar’s Intro) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Rohit Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

The last song of this long album starts off quite simply with a simple dholak rhythm, which I’m sure you’ve heard somewhere before. The composition again, is not up to the mark, and the song lasts for a short one minute. The dholak arrangements break into a digital beat halfway through the track, and I wonder why the song hasn’t been polished before that; it sounds odd to hear a song that has been only half polished. Rohit Sharma’s vocals sound like Udit Narayan in places. The lyrics are situational yet again, and nothing to rave about. Dissatisfying.

Rating: 2/5


Anaarkali of Aarah was an album that bravely stuck to it’s script’s demands. It didn’t feel the requirement to rope in a famous pop singer to make it commercially viable. And as it is, it impressed me because of it’s honesty. The tunes are catchy, and aptly rustic, and clearly stick to the script. Rohit Sharma must have done lots of hard work researching about this style of music from Bihar and U.P. Kudos to that. Last but not the least, kudos to the makers for keeping the tunes as they were needed. Of course, the rating might go down due to the three bonus tracks, but this album was one with catchy tunes, covered with a coat of earth! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 2 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 2 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari > Mann Beqaid Huva > Sa Ra Ra Ra = Aye Sakhi Ooh = Mera Balam Bambaiya > Lahanga Jhaanke > Dunaliya Mein Jung > Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar = Laal Laal Cheekwa = Hamre Jobna Pe

 

Remake Counter
No. of remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 00 (from Anarkali of Aarah) = 08

Which is your favourite song from Anaarkali of Aarah? Please vote for it below! 🙂 Thanks!

LAIDBACK BREATHS! (SAANSEIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vivek Kar
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th November 2016

Saansein Album Cover

Saansein Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saansein is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Rajneesh Duggal, Sonarika Bhadoria and Hiten Tejwani. The film has been directed by Rajiv S. Ruia, and produced by Goutam Jain and Vivek Agarwal. The story is about a club singer, who, every night after her performance, disappears without talking to anyone or meeting anyone. She’s probably possessed.. Come on, Bollywood, we know you better than you do yourself! Anyway, the movie is a horror/romance film, and in such movies, I expect wither a chilling and spine-tingling score, or a sappy, romantic, typical Bhattish score. The music of the film has been entirely composed by Vivek Kar, which makes this his first solo album ever. He is fresh from the success of his song ‘Cycle Se Chalaang’ (Saat Uchakkey), and now he is here with a complete album of a horror film. Going by the songs he composed in his previous albums (‘Zindagi 50-50’, ‘Meeruthiya Gangsters’, ‘Direct Ishq’, ‘One Night Stand’ etc) I think he’s going to give the second category of music I expect for such films (the typical romantic songs), but I do expect a lot more as it is his first solo album. So, without further ado, let’s go through the music of ‘Saansein’, and see how horrific it is!


1. Mera Ishq
Singers ~ Ash King, Arijit Singh & Swati SharmaBacking Vocals ~ Dev Negi & Joi Barua

Vivek Karta presents, as the first song on the album, a fresh and pleasant romantic number, that does impress, but fails to bring that climax point throughout its whole length. I’ll explain. So, the song starts off, with a soothing English verse, that has the backing vocalists Dev Negi and Joi Barua pronouncing words in a quite hilarious way. However, as soon as the main melody kicks in, you starts finding the song to be not as bad as you thought it would be. The mukhda starts with Swati singing some lines in a very soothing but heard-before-ish tune, which sounds a lot better than the songs she sang after her launchpad ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns). Then Arijit enters with a nice, goosebumps-giving tune, that I think would have sounded quite ordinary had he not sung it. And then, the whole song is passed over to Ash King. It is like Arijit & Swati are backing vocalists like Dev and Joi. Anyway, the hookline sounds brilliant, until you remember the antara of that old song, ‘Yunhi Kat Jaayega Safar’ (Hum Hain Raahi Pyaar Ke), after which the hook sounds like a direct lift-off from the old song. The antaras of this song are soothing, and probably the best part of the song, but what I don’t understand is, why Arijit keeps singing only the same line. He sings it so beautifully that I don’t know why Ash has been given the other parts, which seem tailor-made for Arijit! We saw Ash overshadow Arijit earlier this month in ‘Alizeh’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), but here, Arijit overshadows Ash with just his one line against Ash’s almost-entire song. The English verses just sound bad and quite laid-back. Arrangements are soothing too, until you delve deeper and understand how normal they are. The rhythm is nice, with the digital sounds sounding great occasionally, but the programming is horrendous. The sound isn’t clear, resulting in the instruments seeming to be mixed into each other. The flute though, is beautiful! 🙂 Kumaar’s lyrics are more ordinary stuff in an already ordinary song. Seems harmless at first, but the faults start popping up as you delve deeper. A good way to spoil a nice composition.

 

2. Tum Jo Mile / Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Amit Gupta & Pratap Dodla

The next song on the album fares a lot better than the first one, in that it gets the composition just as right as the first song, but that composition is also carried forward well, and embellished with good recording. The composition, though it might sound very heard-before, just like the previous song, does interest the listener, if not fascinate. The mukhda starts the song off well on a mellow note, while the hookline works well. Though it is one of those self-proclaiming hooklines, I really can’t imagine how else the hookline could’ve been incorporated into the song. The initial notes of the hookline somehow reminded me of the line “Abb toh humein…” from ‘Kandhon Se Milte Hain Kandhe’ (Lakshya) but then rather quickly dissipates and changes course. The hookline also consists of a small line with the mandatory word, “Rabba” in it. That part is quite good too. The antara is pleasant too, and again, heard-before, but functional. There is a nice little conclusion stanza at the end, which I quite liked. The main reason the song seems to work, is the vocals, which have been done amazingly by Armaan Malik, who infuses his charm into everything he sings. His voice perfectly suits the composition, and I’m glad Vivek chose him as the singer. The unplugged version on the other hand (which, by the way, is not even unplugged — it has the same arrangements as the original version for the most part of it, just starts off a bit unplugged) doesn’t fare as well, because the lead singer Amit Gupta seems misplaced there. He doesn’t sing the very formulaic song with as much charm as Armaan, thereby exposing the genericness of it. Pratap Dodla joins Amit in this version for backing vocals, I suppose, as I can’t really make out who’s voice is which. The arrangements in the first version are quite typical digital beats, with a nice piano intro to it, while strings shine throughout. However, in the ‘unplugged’ version, the violin gracefully forms the prelude, and interludes, and how I wish that this arrangement had been given to Armaan’s version of the song! Lyrics by Kumaar are quite formulaic as well, with him making note to include ‘humsafar’, ‘Dil’, ‘pal do pal’, ‘Dil’, ‘rabba’, ‘Dil’, and maybe more ‘Dil’, a good many times. After all, they’re the mandatory, quintessential words! Generic-sounding, but the first version is nevertheless a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tum Ho Mere
Singer ~ Najam Bajwa

The next song doesn’t start off too promisingly, with many melancholic ‘Woahh’s making up your grand welcome into it. And after that, the song barely fails to interested you even a bit more. The whole composition is lazy, and terribly slow-paced, with nothing interesting ever happening. The hookline is painfully complicated, with the singer just repeating the line “Tum Ho mere yaa ho nahi?” a gazillion times. By that time, the girl must already have even given her answer! The arrangements don’t help at all, to make the listener like the song. The beats are outdated, and there is no instrument that stands out amidst the dusty and laidback feel of the song. I could hear the piano and strings, but it is too plain and also buried too deep inside the arrangements. The guitars are audible mostly, but they are played so slowly, that you question whether they are guitars or sloths. The vocals are another reason to not listen to the song. Debutant Najam Bajwa doesn’t seem like he was fit for a solo song, but he nevertheless drawls his way through this. Kumaar’s lyrics have already been talked enough about, I guess. Easily skippable!

 

4. Dil Yeh Khamakha / Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise)
Singers ~ Dev Negi / Nikhil D’Souza

The next song too, starts off in such a way that you get frightened whether it isn’t the same melancholia of the previous song repeating itself all over again in this one. But to be honest, this song gets lots and lots better as it progresses. The composition does start off on a faltering note, but then steadies itself, and by the time it reaches the hookline, you happily keep listening to it. It is the first time I have witnessed such an improvement from the initial notes to the hookline of a song! The hookline is beautifullyand hauntingly amazing. The composition sounds even a bit of something Rahman would compose. The antara continues what the hookline started off, making the song actually sound complete and wholesome in itself. The song appears in two versions and I must say, both singers have done a great job at it. Dev Negi, with a more newbie approach to it, sounds innocent in his rendition of the pleasing composition, whereas Nikhil D’Souza brings more of a professional approach to it, singing in his trademark style, which he used to sing in for Pritam and the Bhatts. Both singers provide a fulfilling touch to the song, though. The arrangements remain the same in both versions. The unexpectedly brilliant electronic tabla beats amazed me, while the nice digital sounds in the hookline reminded me of Viju Shah’s excellent arrangements, which were quite similar, and way ahead of their times in the 90s. (‘Mushkil Bada Yeh Pyaar Hai’ from ‘Gupt’ being one of my most favourites!) The whistle is nice, and the chimes bring in a fresh factor to the song. Piano was expected, and it does a nice job here. Kumaar’s lyrics again, are very typical. One of the better song of the album, maybe the best too! Both versions are a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Royi
Singer ~ Shibani Sur

The last song on the album is what actually blew me away. Rightly kept as the album’s last song, this song has everything that a song should, in order to impress my musical sensibilities. The composition again, starts off very slowly, but this one hooked me from the start — perhaps the introduction of a female solo singer provided the necessary change in the album. Whatever it is, the composition is great. The mukhda, the hookline and the antaras are inexplicably finely crafted. The slow composition did the trick here, which didn’t quite work in the other songs. Also, the nice little semi-classical touch was enough to blow me away. The arrangements, with nothing much happening, gave a nice lounge-ish feel to the song. Whatever does happen though, is attractive enough for the listeners to enjoy. The digital beats, for one, are really cool! The vocals by débutante Shibani Sur, a trained classical singer, are awesome, and her husky voice is a perfect match to the quite drowsy feel of the song. The little nuances she performs in the antara lines, is to fall for! She handles her high notes, as well as the low ones, very well. Hoping to hear more of her in Bollywood in the future, and kudos to Vivek for presenting her beautiful voice in front of us all. Kumaar’s lyrics are quite better here, and have some meaning, other than the usual melancholia he wrote in the album. The best took long enough to arrive. A perfect grand finale to a not-so-perfect album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Saansein kind of meets my expectations. It certainly met my expectation that it would consist of typical Bhatt-style romantic songs under the name of spooky songs, but it didn’t quite meet the expectation I kept towards it being Vivek’s first solo album and chance to score a nice soundtrack. The tracks are nice, no doubt, but the compositions in most of them seem very laidback, and that’s the turn off. Two of the tracks are fantastic, while the other three try to fiddle with the rapidly-disappearing genre of typical Bhatt romance, which even the Bhatts will move on from soon, as far as I presume! This album lacks fresh air…!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Royi > Dil Yeh Khamakha = Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise) > Tum Jo Mile > Mera Ishq > Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) > Tum Ho Mere

 

Which is your favourite song from Saansein? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SOUTH MEETS NORTH! (TUTAK TUTAK TUTIYA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Vishal Mishra, Gurinder Seagal, Dr. Bal Sidhu, Raaj Aashoo & Music MG
♪ Lyrics by: Irfan Kamal, Danish Sabri, Manoj Yadav, Pranav Vatsa, Shabbir Ahmed, Dr. Bal Sidhu, Lil Golu, Malkit Singh, Veer Rahimpuri & Music MG
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th September 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 7th October 2016

Tutak Tutak Tutiya Album Cover

Tutak Tutak Tutiya Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tutak Tutak Tutiya is a trilingual horror comedy film, made as ‘Devi’ in Tamil and ‘Abhinetri’ in Telugu, starring Tamannaah Bhatia, Prabhudeva and Sonu Sood in lead roles, and Amy Jackson in a special appearance. The movie is directed by Vijay, and produced by Sonu Sood. The movie opened to mixed to positive reviews in all three languages, while the film’s music was creating a wave among masses, and I was writing my exams. 😛 So, heading directly towards the music. The music for the Telugu and Tamil films has been given by Sajid-Wajid and newcomer, Vishal Mishra, each having composed two songs each. These four songs have been included in the Hindi album, along with a bonus of three more songs that will cater to the Hindi audiences and increase the buzz of the movie in Punjab. 😛 They are all either Punjabi songs or by Punjabi artists, and added just to attract the Hindi audience. These songs are composed by Gurinder Seagal, who gave that great non-film single, ‘GF BF’ earlier this year. He has remade one of Dr. Bal Sidhu’s wedding numbers, ‘Rail Gaddi’. The next song is a remake of Malkit Singh’s ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’, also the namesake of this album, and that has been recreated by Raaj Aashoo. Lastly, Music MG comes with an original club number, which I’m not excited for. Let’s jump into this ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’!


1. Rail Gaddi
Singers ~ Navraj Hans, Swati Sharma & Lil Golu, Original Composition by ~ Dr. Bal Sidhu, Music Recreated by ~ Gurinder Seagal, Original Lyrics by ~ Dr. Bal Sidhu, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap by ~ Lil Golu

The first track on the album is one that will really get those Hindi audiences attracted to the film like bears are attracted to honey. A remake of the hit Punjabi track ‘Rail Gaddi’, this one has already made people go crazy around the nation. As you guys know and must be thinking now, I do not like many of these remakes of Punjabi pop numbers. However, this one is different! The composition, which I found out was originally by Kuljit Bhamrah, but T-Series have credited Dr. Bal Sidhu, is good and catchy, and even Gurinder’s new additions are not bad, though a bit generic. The most generic it gets is in the antara, where the song sounds like a direct lift-off from the antara of the ‘Housefull 3’ song ‘Malamaal’. Or maybe all Punjabi songs sound the same to me. Anyway, the song starts with a hilarious dialogue said in a funny style, and then the quintessential tumbi makes its presence felt by playing the hookline tune. Navraj Hans’ programmed voice sounds good, and also sounds like Vishal Dadlani at places. I appreciate that Gurinder trued to get a big singer to sing the song, but the heavy programming done on his voice could’ve been cut down upon, especially after he sang with such finesse, that rock song ‘Raj Karega Khalsa’ in ‘A Flying Jatt’. Swati Sharma barely gets any scope to sing anything in the first antara, as she gets just one line, which sounds very bad. However, the second antara is all hers, and she spoils whatever fun the song was giving you by singing that. Again, the programming kills her voice, and makes it sound ridiculous. Lil Golu is back, without Yo Yo Honey Singh this time, and his rap might make you faint. He has a rap before both antaras, and both of them are ridiculously stupid. The hookline is definitely the best part of the song, and when the hookline is the best part of a REMADE song, you know things are wrong. However, the arrangements do help to make this one an enjoyable club song. Gurinder, who I think is very good at club beats (after hearing ‘GF BF’ that is) has made the pacy club beats overshadow his run-of-the-mill composition. The great electronic shehnaais really entertain. Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are the usual random stuff that people ignore due to the pacy beats, so even I’m ignoring those. 😛 Quite entertaining and enjoyable, but a remake that could’ve been better in terms of vocals and composition. Not lyrics because this is the maximum level of IQ that I expect from such songs!

 

2. Chal Maar
Singer ~ Wajid, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Irfan Kamal

Sajid-Wajid enter the album for the second song, which is also the first song of the album that is from the Tamil/Telugu versions. And I understand why Prabhudeva must’ve chosen this song for the film! Last October, Sajid-Wajid and Prabhudeva had given us a treat called ‘Cinema Dekhe Mamma’ (Singh Is Bliing), which was a complete desi tune with desi music. This time too, though Prabhudeva isn’t the director here, Sajid-Wajid, two of his favourites, give a song that is at par with that one. The first time you listen to the song, you’ll be like ‘Where am I? Why am I even listening to this?” But after some listens (if you give it time, that is) the composition starts to unfold its magic. The upbeat, very desi composition starts growing on you, and finally, grabs you completely. That shehnaai-like loop just intrigues you and it plays so many times, that you just start loving it! Of course, Sajid-Wajid are experts in giving this kind of music. 😀 But this time, it just worked too well. The composition too, seems average at first, especially the line before the hookline (“Bheja hai kamar pe…. Bend it like Beckham baby!”) and the hookline itself, which consists of only two words, Chal and Maar, seemingly shouted out randomly. The line just before that though, is so sweet and attractive! It goes “Chakhne de, haaye chakhne de, tere ishq ka zaayaka”. Sajid-Wajid have composed that line so beautifully, I die every time I hear it! 😀 The antara, though it could’ve been better, does its job of keeping you glued. What is the reason? The arrangements, of course! You all know how I praise Sajid-Wajid so much for their amazing arrangements every time, and this time too, they have stunned with their magnificent percussion, the slow South-Indian style rhythms and the AMAZING brass band. Of course though, that shehnaai loop (which is actually played on a melodica) is supposed to be the USP of the song, and it definitely is for me! The guitars are wonderful as well. The Tamil and Telugu versions of the song have been sung by Benny Dayal and Nakash Aziz respectively, and at first I was frustrated because we got stuck with Wajid. However, after hearing the song, I can happily say that Wajid, one of the composers, has rendered the song very nicely. He sounds youthful as well as cool! When he sings that sweet line that I pointed out, I just start to sing along. He sings that line so nicely! 😀 And he sings the hook phrase with such attitude, that I concluded that he was the perfect choice for the song. Irfan Kamal’s lyrics too, are ignorable. Very enjoyable, and a perfect song for Prabhudeva to show off his moves onscreen! Hats off to Sajid-Wajid yet again for the arrangements! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tutak Tutak Tutiya
Singers ~ Malkit Singh, Kanika Kapoor & Sonu Sood, Original Composition by ~ Malkit Singh, Music Recreated by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Original Lyrics by ~ Veer Rahimpuri, New Lyrics by ~ Malkit Singh & Shabbir Ahmed

Yet another remake we have on the album. This one serves as the title track. This one is a remake of Malkit’s 80s hit, ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’, and Raaj Aashoo has got the chance to recreate this one. And he seizes the opportunity and makes gold of it. The song starts again, with the representative of Punjabi songs, tumbi, followed by dhadd and a wonderful flute that just makes you feel happy. The composition of the mukhda is basically the same as that of the original, with the first line revamped by Raaj Aashoo. The song mostly follows the same composition of the hookline, and it is a very strong and effective tune. Especially the “Haye Jamaalo!” The antara is short and catchy as well, and definitely a new addition. After that, the hookline takes over once again, until the song ends. The arrangements are basically insane club beats, along with mad flutes winning your heart, and EDM that makes you wanna dance. The vocals are good, with Malkit Singh having re-recorded the song with the new lyrics that he, along with Shabbir Ahmed, has written. Kanika Kapoor gets a very small scope to open up, but her portions sound cute as always. Sonu Sood does a rap portion that is entertaining for all that it’s worth. Raaj Aashoo also makes the vocalists sing “Tutak tutak” in the background at the beginning, and that effect is so cool! 😀 The lyrics are average again, and meant for fun. A foot-tapping remake of a classic pop song, with Raaj Aashoo’s flute standing high above everything else! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Love The Way You Dance
Singers ~ Jazzy B, Sonu Sood & Millind Gaba, Music by ~ Music MG (Millind Gaba), Lyrics by ~ Music MG (Millind Gaba)

The way this song starts, your mind suddenly cries out “West!” 😛 The shameless aping of the West that happens in so many Bollywood club songs, is evident in this song as well. And guess what? Millind Gaba is back, after his epic fails in Bollywood, from that ‘Welcome Back’ title song, to the most recent ‘Housefull 3’ song ‘Malamaal’. The composition, I admit, is quite decent, as it tries to keep you hooked. However, it just doesn’t work out. The club beats are a direct lift of Millind Baba’s own ‘Welcome Back’ title song. Also, the hookline is so pathetically composed, that whatever you feel about the start of the song, all evaporates because of the hookline. The generic composition has nothing to offer in terms of variation or innovation. This Music MG has a unidimensional thought and composition style. The vocals by Jazzy B are just irritating, and the overdone Punjabi lyrics by Millind are too much to handle. Sonu Sood’s rap sounds horrifying. Of course, this is a horror comeda, isn’t it! 😀 Terrible attempt to ape the West!

 

5. Chalte Chalte
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

The next song marks the entry of another composer into the album, this time, a debutant – Vishal Mishra. Now this is the same Vishal Mishra who sang a song in ‘Shorgul’ as well. He steps into composing with this film, and with such a composition, you know he didn’t just foray into composing just for the sake of it! The composition is extremely pleasing and calming, as well as groovy at the same time. The mukhda has the power of pulling you in instantly, and the hookline is so, so cute, that you just cat ignore it. What’s more, it doesn’t force itself on you, and rather, plays on its own will, and you don’t even get to know. The antara is just a continuation of the sweetness. Both the times it plays, you are reminded of those sweet songs where the boy is just preoccupied with thoughts of some girl he’s seen somewhere in the middle of nowhere, that always play in Bollywood films. One of them is ‘I Love You’ (Bodyguard), and this song reminded me a lot of that, as well as the recent ‘Purza Purza’ (Akira). Vishal’s decision to get Arijit to sing this song turns out to be a very efficient one. Arijit, with sweetness ozzing out of his voice, delivers it with the same cuteness as it was meant to be delivered. His high notes leave you stunned, while he is, as it is, a master at low notes. The arrangements are awesome as well, with a cool jazzy touch to them. The guitars throughout provide a foot-tapping rhythm, while electronic beats are at their best in the song. A rock guitar interlude steals the show when it plays, even though it plays for about less than 10 seconds. Manoj Yadav’s lyrics are the first good lyrics in the album, and they do suit the romance theme, as well as give you some good words for your ears to chew on. Trippy! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Suku Suku
Singer ~ Shivranjani Singh, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

The next song turns out to be Sajid-Wajid’s second and last song in the album, and it starts with very, very impressive hip-hop beats through which they really prove their mettle at making music of so many different styles yet again. The impressive introduction, though, gives way to something that just falls downhill until the antara. The mukhda is such a weakly composed one, that I’m surprised Sajid-Wajid couldn’t get a better opening line to such a wonderfully opened song. The tune sounds sappy and something that goes in very low status movies. I mean, what is “Dance karle aiissaaaa, Sridevi jaiiiisaaaa!”!? The hookline too, is not impressive at all. However, the antara is composed so nicely and sweetly, in a pleasant desi tune, that you wonder how the duo could get this tune after such a bland opening. The composers have paid too much attention, as always, to giving a very great auditory experience to the listeners. The arrangements are just mind-blowing. With very cool EDM and techno beats, the composers score high with the arrangements. A very entertaining and professional African percussion piece plays in one of the interludes, and that is just not to be missed. Backing vocalists going “Yeah!” at random places also qualifies as good Western-styled arrangements. 😛 And the composers have aced that as well. The vocals by Shivranjani Singh, who seems to have become the composer duo’s favourite now for item songs, instead of Mamta Sharma, sings the composition well, but the texture she gives to her voice, makes her sound drunk like always. (Like she sounded in ‘Lalla Lalla Lori’ from ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’) She sings that antara very cutely though. 😀 And the hookline, sounds very obnoxious in her voice. WHAT IS A SUKU SUKU?! HOW DO YOU DANCE LIKE A SUKU SUKU?? These are the questions I would like to ask Danish Sabri, who, when the time comes, very nicely gives only backing vocals to Qawwali-esque songs, but when it comes to writing, writes all this ‘Suku’ stuff. :/ At least write something we understand? How do you expect us to dance like a Suku Suku if we don’t know what a Suku Suku is? Is that some new species discovered by you, Mr. Danish Sabri? Please enlighten us then! This song is suitable only for Suku Sukus. Barring the splendid arrangements, and the composition for the antara, this song is a Suku Suku!

 

7. Ranga Re
Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Pranav Vatsa

For the grand finale of the album, we have a very dulcet melody to mellow things down after all that Suku Suku. Vishal Mishra is back to give this grand finale to the album. The composition is a very peaceful and soulful one, with touches of classical oriental Asian music. The melody is something that seems to be the only one on the abum that has been planned out before and made in a good amount of time, as it has turned out rather perfect. The mukhda has the low notes appealoung to you and luring you into the song, while the hookline takes things to a more lively scale, and it ends up chilling you with its majestic qualities. The antaras are just as beautiful, and deserve to be paid more attention, if you ask me. On a whole, the composition is very scintillating. In some places, it has shades of ‘Sapna Jahan’ (Brothers) and in others it also coincidentally sounds like ‘Rangaa Re’ (Fitoor). The arrangements are sparkling. First, we have mellow piano, along with flute (Varad Kathaurka) and a wonderful entrancing rhythm in the background. After that, things elevate to an all-out rock song, with guitars, both electric and acoustic (both by Vaibhav Pani) leading the way. In the interludes, Vishal Mishra weaves magic with the instrumentation. The first interlude has a dulcet flute solo, ranging from low to high notes. In the second, things are exactly opposite, with a lively and charismatic rock guitar giving a very electrifying performance. Vocals by Shreya Ghoshal are beautiful, but definitely not her best. At places, I thought she was singing like Shilpa Rao too! 😀 There is a particular part in the song where I loved her variations, and that is the last time she sings the word ‘Banjaaaraaa’, at 4:55 minutes into the song. Pranav Vatsa’s lyrics are good, and inspirational. A grand finale indeed! The only matured composition on the album, and sung by the Nightingale. #5StarHotelSong!!


Tutak Tutak Tutiya gives whatever it has promised, with songs catering to both masses and classes (with Vishal Mishra catering to the classes and the rest to the masses :P) The seven songs compiled for the Hindi version of the film are a great mix of the North Indian and South Indian flavour. Though Vishal Mishra’s songs sound more like Bollywood songs, the fact that they were originally for the Southern versions of the film, makes you look at it from a whole new light. The two remakes have been done good, and revamped so that the new generation will like them, with the title track faring slightly better. The four tracks that are also in the Tamil & Telugu versions of the album, are good, with ‘Suku Suku’ being the only disappointing one, but that one too has amazing arrangements. At the end though, it is Vishal Mishra who creates the most magic in the album, with both his songs working perfectly, and I’m sure, instrumental for the film. A perfect comedy film album, with a good mix of South and North India!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ranga Re > Chal Maar > Tutak Tutak Tutiya > Chalte Chalte > Rail Gaddi > Suku Suku > Love The Way You Dance

 

Which is your favourite song from Tutak Tutak Tutiya? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT SO FREAKY; RATHER SWEET!! (FREAKY ALI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed & Danish Sabri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th September 2016

Freaky Ali Album Cover

Freaky Ali Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Freaky Ali is an upcoming Bollywood sports / comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Amy Jackson, Arbaaz Khan, Jas Arora, Seema Biswas and Nikitin Dheer. The movie has been directed and produced by Sohail Khan, and presented by Salman Khan. The movie is an unofficial remake of Adam Sandler’s 1996 movie, ‘Happy Gilmore’, and revolves around the story of a debt collector, Ali, whose fate changes when he discovers that he is made for playing golf, and what follows is the inspirational story of Ali. The story seems good, and would be interesting to watch, but what grabs my attention is a question — Where do songs come in the picture here?? Leave it up to Sohail though, for finding a perfect musical duo to compose for the movie, and that is Sajid-Wajid, returning after eight months after the flop that their album to ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’ was, with only ‘Jawaani Le Doobi’ busting the charts. This time, they decide to compose a mere three songs for the film, and that is surprising! Hopefully, they compose three gems according to the theme of the film, and stun us with their renowned arrangements. So, let’s see how many shots they score in their own musical game!


1. Din Mein Karengey Jagrata
Singers ~ Wajid, Divya Kumar & Swati Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

Sajid-Wajid start off this short album with a dance song, which is quite typical of their composition style, yet sounds different and unique. The song seems like a celebratory one, to be placed at a very happy occasion in the movie. The composer duo has produced a tune that doesn’t really fascinate you as such, but it still does what it is supposed to do, which is to entertain you. There are some places where the hookline is painfully dull and very heard-before and typical of Sajid-Wajid, but some lines are very polished and energetically captivating. The song starts off nicely, with some lines sung by Swati Sharma that are really quirky and funny, and when Divya Kumar starts, the song goes to a whole different level of fun and enthusiasm. The mukhda is quite captivating, managing to grab the listener’s attention, fortunately, because the rest of the song fails to match the enthusiasm of the starting, sounding uncontrollably outdated. The hookline itself is weak enough, but the antaras don’t help at all. (Reminding you a lot, lot, lot, of Sajid-Wajid’s ‘Phatte Tak Nachna’ from ‘Dolly Ki Doli’) However, just to save themselves from listeners leaving the song because of a weak composition, the duo infuses some great arrangements to catch your attention — rather, to divert it from the composition. The brass band is played in quite a quirky way, and after doing so many such songs in Bollywood, Sajid-Wajid seem to have got the hang of it. Some weird but catchy pigeon sounds grace the whole song, and the duo has put in more attractive sound effects like this. Of course, the traditional harmonium, dhols and electronic tablas can’t stay away in a wedding song by Sajid-Wajid! And no complaints, either. The duo cover up for the composition with their booming arrangements. The harmonium-led second interlude is a wonderful one. The duo also uses a lot of techno music to make the song connect more with the modern audience. The vocals are good as well, with Swati Sharma very nicely singing like a village girl, again, after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns). Her voice is very suitable for this track and kudos to Sajid-Wajid for roping her in for this song, and making it her first song with them. Also, I am afraid they would’ve used Mamta Sharma’s voice if not Swati’s so thank God! Divya Kumar is as energetic as ever, and though he has sung so many songs of this type previously, he just steals the show, along with Wajid, who accompanies him mostly in the hookline. The lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed are not too bad, and not excellent, but enjoyable and suitable for this type of song! Sajid-Wajid shoot back with this song, which could’ve done with a better composition, otherwise, it’s a song to tap your feet on and go crazy to!

 

2. Parinda Hai Parinda
Singer ~ Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

The next song happens to be a motivational song, and the duo have made an excellent song. The composition evokes memory of Ajay-Atul’s Marathi song from ‘Sairat’, ‘Aatach Baya Ka Baavarla’ in the first line, but that gets diffused as soon as the listener can catch it. The duo has come up with a composition which is quite melodious and soulful, with a distinct Sufi touch to it. The song has the power to make you hear it patiently for the first time. The mukhda is very good and the melody sucks you in, while the antara keeps up the sweetness, and the hookline is something that appeals to you even in its clichéd-ness! Overall, Sajid-Wajid have struck the right notes with the composition. The arrangements are beautiful too. With the violin very gracefully starting the song off, the acoustic guitar and cello take over to make the arrangements sound more Westernized. The use of strings throughout the song is marvelous, with each of them superseding the other, resulting in a grand orchestration by Sajid-Wajid, consisting of so many stringed instruments, like both electric and acoustic guitars, violins, a cello, and many other types of strings! The beats are wonderful as well, with a very catchy groove to them. What did bother me though, was Wajid’s singing. His voice sounded very unusually shaky and it definitely did not work in favour of the composition, because the first thing I noticed when I first heard the song was his singing itself! It just didn’t go well with the tune, that, in my opinion, required a very young and smooth voice. Shabbir’s lyrics again, are good. This time he writes many more Urdu words in the song, and they sound good for sure. 😀 The lyrics trace Ali’s journey and success well. A good song, but again, shortly misses to be a great song, because of wrong choice of singer!!

 

3. Ya Ali Murtaza (Qawwali)
Singers ~ Wajid, Danish Sabri & Payal Dev, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

The name of this song suggests right away that it is a Qawwali, but T-Series still thought it better to specify that extrinsically just in case. Anyway, if you know Sajid-Wajid, then you should also know that they are awesome at making Qawwalis too. However, this here isn’t a traditional Qawwali. Rather, it is a fusion of two cultures, two traditions and ultimately, two religions. The composition is a very strong and instantly-healing type. It exudes strength and makes you feel protected all of a sudden. The duo has done a wonderful job in fusing a typical Qawwali composition with a typical bhajan composition. Both the tunes have fused together so well, that it is hard to think after hearing this song, that a bhajan and a Qawwali are two different music styles! Last we heard this kind of fusion between a bhajan and a Qawwali was almost two years ago in ‘Teri Dua’ (Hawaizaada). The duo excel with this fusion, and though there is an omnipresent dark and sinister tone to the song, it is nothing but strengthening and motivating. The duo’s fantastic arrangement skills are showed off in this song as well, more so because it is a fusion between two music styles. Most of the song is arranged on Ganpati beats, with the dhols, taashe and lezims, along with a very trademark Marathi tune played in the first interlude. The duo very nicely go back and forth between the bhajan and Qawwali. The song starts with the adlib before a traditional Qawwali, sung with a lot of confidence and gusto by Danish Sabri and Wajid. After that is over, the energetic Ganpati beats set in, on which the hookline has been arranged! Everything happens so fast, that you need a couple of times hearing the song to process it all! There is a seamless transition from the loud Ganpati beats to traditional Qawwali beats on the tablas in the mukhda, but the manjeeras from the Ganpati side still don’t stop!! The antara starts with a bhajan which is again followed by a Qawwali portion. The brilliant idea and thought behind the song leaves you in awe. The duo must’ve worked really hard to bring out the contrast, yet unity in the song. At the end, there is a big tempo change, and the bhajan is interspersed with cries to “Maula” and “Ya ali murtaza“. The vocals are spectacular, and the coordination between the two parts is what makes it sound even better. Wajid and Danish Sabri handle the Qawwali with lots of boost and confidence, while Payal Dev’s voice has this very overpowering quality, while singing the aarti. All three of them sound fabulous together. Danish Sabri’s lyrics are very devotional, and you just drown into them. Here, the gem of the album is hidden; A devotional song for two communities showcasing the unity of these two prominent communities. A genius idea of the makers gets executed excellently and turns out to end this album on a very grand scale! #5StarHotelSong!!


Freaky Ali turns out to be quite a good album. Sajid-Wajid live up to expectations from a sports film like this one, by delivering less, but good songs. All three songs have a different touch to them, and though the first two lack in one department, as a whole the album is good! Sajid-Wajid give music to this film about a ‘freak’ in a very non-freaky, but sweet and enjoyable way!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ya Ali Murtaza (Qawwali) > Parinda Hai Parinda > Din Mein Karengey Jagrata

 

Which is your favourite song from Freaky Ali? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Raaz Reboot, Chefs: Jeet Gannguli & Sangeet-Siddharth Haldipur

DHOL, HEART AND SOUL!! (TANU WEDS MANU RETURNS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Krsna Solo, Tanishk-Vayu (Tanishk Bagchi & Vayu Shrivastav) & Surj RDB
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar, Vayu Shrivastav, NS Chauhan & Surj RDB
♪ Music Label: Eros Music [‘Mari Gali’ on T-Series]
♪ Music Released On: 29th April 2015
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd May 2015

Tanu Weds Manu Returns Album Cover

Tanu Weds Manu Returns Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear ‘Mari Gali’ on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy ‘Mari Gali’ on iTunes CLICK HERE

Hear ‘Mari Gali’ on YouTube:


Tanu Weds Manu Returns is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy film, starring Kangana Ranaut, R. Madhavan and…. Well, Kangana Ranaut. (Double Role!! 😛 ) The film has been directed by Anand L. Rai and produced by Kishore Lulla and the director. As the title suggests, the film is a sequel to the 2011 hit film, ‘Tanu Weds Manu’, and both Kangana and R. Madhavan reprise their roles from the first movie. However, kahaani mein twist hai! Kangana is playing the role of another character as well, and that is Kusum, a Haryanvi athlete. And the music goes to the same person, who debuted into Bollywood with the first movie, Krsna Solo. (Don’t get confused by the addition of ‘Solo’ after his name 😛 ) Also, duo Tanishk-Vayu and Surj (RDB) each have been given one song each. The first movie had a spectacular album, full of fun dance numbers as well as soulful traditional Punjabi folk Qawwalis and Sufi songs. Given that it was one of the best albums of 2011, one expects more from the album of the sequel!! So, does Krsna, along with the two guest composers, give us what’s expected? Read on to find out!! 🙂


1. Banno
Singers ~ Brijesh Shandllya & Swati Sharma, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Vayu {Shrivastav}

The album to the sequel of a hit Punjabi film should have a grand opening, in my opinion. And what else is better to start it off, than an extremely catchy, wacky and insane Punjabi wedding song!? The guest composers Tanishk Bagchi and Vayu Shrivastav work together as a duo, to compose the wonderful grand opening to the album. Since it is a Punjabi wedding song, people are bound to compare it to the other Punjabi wedding songs from Kangana’s past films, like ‘Jugni’ and ‘Saddi Gali’ (Tanu Weds Manu) and ‘London Thumakda’ (Queen). However, I have to say that, though the song is full of that recognizable Punjabi touch, it is something that will soon… Or rather, it already has, gained an identity of its own. First of all, what should I say about Tanishk & Vayu’s awesome composition! Whatever I say, will be an understatement! They have composed, in their Bollywood debut itself, something that is bound to catch hold of you so tightly, that it won’t ever leave you. The first time I heard this song, it instantly got stuck in my head, and that energetic vibe instantly appealed to me. Especially the hookline, which will definitely make you laugh the first time you hear it! Of course, the tune gets credit, but more than that, the wonderful and gripping arrangements help the song make a greater impact on the listeners’ ears. A perfect blend of techno sounds, voice programming and traditional Punjabi instruments — Dhol, nagada, tumbi and the rustic feel given by the harmonium and flute, all just enhances the feel of the song. Lyrics have to be mentioned, and they are about the carefree nature of the main character, described in an entertaining way through Hinglish lyrics that can easily be understood, and also memorized thanks to the nice rhythm and tune. Lastly, the two brilliant voices behind this cracker of a song — Brijesh Shandilya & Swati Sharma. The way Brijesh renders the major portion of the song in his folksy voice, makes the cute tune sound even cuter, and Swati’s hookline, efficiently programmed at the right places, makes you go back to hear the song again just for her part. She has joined the likes of the Nooran Sisters, Kakkar Sisters (Neha & Sonu) as the unconventional, yet appealing female voices of Bollywood. With that, it makes Tanishk-Vayu’s future journey in Bollywood all the more easier, given the blast of a song they’ve created here!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Mat Ja Re
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics by ~ Raj Shekhar

And with this song, Krsna has entered the soundtrack. The song is a sad song, composed on the typical 90s template, complete with the daflis, and the composition that just reminds you so much of that era. The only thing that might have some shades of the contemporary music scene, is none other than Ankit Tiwari. However much I have taunted him in my past reviews, now is the time to actually appreciate him. The wonderful composition by Krsna has a pleasant flow to it, making you sing along. And this is possible, because the composition is very simple and quire easy to pick up as well! And Ankit has expertly rendered it without the characteristic autotune of his, which he carries with him wherever he goes. He brings both the emotion and romance into his voice and very sweetly sings the whole thing, making you drown in the composition. Arrangements cannot be ignored at all! Every second holds a new surprise for us in this song. Krsna has made sure nobody who starts to hear this song leaves it without listening to the whole song. How? By placing various attractive instruments throughout the song. The dafli rhythm plays on through the whole song, joined by strings, flutes, harmonium, and wonderful Latin-sounding guitars. That really touches the heart and makes you want to go on listening! Lyrics are also something great from Raj Shekhar, following the sad song pattern, yet appealing to the ears and mind. Ankit’s best rendition till date, and a heart-touching composition by Krsna, with equally heart-touching lyrics! Not to mention the out-of-this-world arrangements! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Ghani Bawri
Singer ~ Jyoti Nooran, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics by ~ Raj Shekhar

If it was ‘Jugni’ in the first film, in this film it is ‘Ghani Bawri’ that will have the masses in the single-screen theatres in villages dancing to its tune. Nothing can start as dynamically and as energetically as this song. After the sad song by Ankit, when this song starts, you will suddenly be shaken out of your trance and into a totally mad and crazy mood for the next four-odd minutes. Jyoti Nooran gets her third song in Bollywood, this time without her sister, and she starts off this track with an electrifying vocal rhythm, that is sure to grab your attention right away. The instant energy boost that this song gives you, no energy drink will ever give you! The bubbliness of the song is just too much to describe! It is one of those songs which is so cute and bubbly, showcasing the bubbliness of the character in the film, that it just can’t get out of your head for quite some time. Krsna’s tune, of course, is really captivating, but the heroine of this song is, hands down, Jyoti Nooran! Her energy is unbelievable, and how she maintains it all throughout the song at the same level, is beyond my understanding. Kudos to her for this crackling performance! Be sure not to miss her rap part, in the second interlude. It just sounds funny to hear a folk singer like her rap, and that too, in Punjabi! Krsna has placed wonderful Punjabi arrangements to entertain us side by side, as Jyoti is too wonderful to ignore. There is one line in the song sung by a man, which I guess is his, and he has sung it wonderfully! The song will gain the same popularity and attention as ‘Katiya Karoon’ (Rockstar), to which it sounds very similar, too, as far as the arrangements go. Raj’s lyrics very well use Haryanvi terms to make it an interesting listen. One of the liveliest and most captivating Punjabi songs of the recent months!! A refreshing break from cheap Punjabi rap, where we get to hear the true essence of Punjabi and Haryanvi music! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Old School Girl / Old School Girl (Haryanvi Version)
Singers ~ Anmol Malik / Kalpana Gandharv, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics By ~ Raj Shekhar

Just about less than two weeks ago, I reviewed an album full of jazz numbers, ‘Bombay Velvet’. All the music reviewers, and all the music lovers loved that album, as it stuck to the requirements of the script and adhered to the era in which the film was set. At the same time, it gave us a great variety of jazzy songs. But it’s not only ‘Bombay Velvet’ that has jazz songs. Recently, Bollywood has been witnessing a sudden influx of jazz songs in almost every movie that comes and has a situation for such a number. With the Jazz bug biting Bollywood, and biting it hard, we can help ourselves to yet another jazz song in Bollywood, this time, in such a place, where it is highly unexpected — a Punjabi-themed soundtrack! It is a song written purely in English by Raj Shekhar, and what he has written, is just so sweet, that you can’t ignore it. Anmol sings beautifully, and carries the jazzy tune on her shoulders. Yes, there are points where her voice sounds way too muffled to understand what she’s even saying, but never mind. To help her, are the awesome and apt arrangements that Krsna has placed in the track. Of course, the regular jazz trumpets, trombones, drums and saxophones can be heard. And that piano is awesome too! The lilting tune by Krsna really wins half the battle for the song. Complex, yes, but endearing, definitely! On the other hand, in the “Haryanvi Version”, things become a bit more desi, with the same English lyrics, and you can just imagine how funny that would sound! Yup, newcomer Kalpana Gandharv gets to carry out this version, and she does so with such grace and finesse (here you say “Ahem. Ahem. Seriously?” 😂) that it actually ends up coming across as more sweet and lovable than the first version. When they named it Haryanvi Version, I wonder what they were thinking, because, the lyrics are the same, the tune is the same, the arrangements sound retro Kolkata-ish. However, the vocals are those of a gaon Ki chhori, and the way she pronounces some words, will really make you laugh out loud; they really come across as hilarious!! She sounds a lot, lot like Rekha Bharadwaj. The harmonica, guitars in this version really make it sound better. Jazz wasn’t expected here, and so it was a great pleasure to hear it here! 😛 Try both versions, they’re worth your time!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Move On
Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics by ~ Raj Shekhar

When this song starts, there is a huge setback waiting right at the beginning of it. And that is, the striking, very-hard-to-ignore and huge resemblance to ‘Bol Beliya’ (Kill/Dil). What a coincidence, that Sunidhi is the singer of both! The resemblance just hits you right in the ears, demanding for some attention instantly. Anyways, you listen on. The composition, though having that really unignorable similarity, is actually very efficiently done. Because I had loved ‘Bol Beliya’, I naturally loved this too. But that wasn’t the case with most people. 😛 The song is a sad song with a twist — it doesn’t have the character sitting and repenting about the past, crying over spilt milk, but instead, it motivates the character to “Move On”, which was a pretty unique and interesting concept to me. As good ad the idea might have been, had the execution been a tad better, it would’ve been really great. For one, the lyrics are all tolerable, until the hookline comes. In the midst of a Hindi song, with almost all words in Hindi, how would it feel if suddenly, some English words come in a bulk delivery? Not good. It feels like someone’s pelting stones at your face — sorry, ears 😛 It sounds so cheap, you have to hear it to believe it. If any other words would’ve been used instead of “Move On” over there, it would be a really great song, all in all. Arrangements are perfect, effective dhols creating the desired impact. Vocals are by Sunidhi, so is there any doubt whether they will be good? When you have someone like Sunidhi behind the mic, you can steal sounds from anywhere, write irritating lyrics, and still get away with it. (WINK, WINK 😉 😉 ) So that’s the story of how Krsna got away with it and escaped from the public, but not from me! Probably the only disappointing song from Krsna in this album, just because of the oh-so-obvious tune lift. And also disappointed by whoever thought of that hookline…!!

 

6. Ho Gaya Hai Pyar
Singer ~ Dev Negi, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics by ~ Raj Shekhar

The next song brings in the heart and soul of this album, the romantic songs! Dev Negi gets one more song this month, after that awesome, sweet ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ (Gabbar Is Back). And he shines here too! Krsna’s heart-touching melody is something that stays with you for days and days, and can never get out. In fact, you’ll have to force it to get out one day! It is such a beautiful melody, which will have you instantly hooked. Dev Negi resembles Shaan here, and I still can’t find any identity of its own for his voice. However, though he sounds like Shaan, he renders this beautiful romantic song following a classical path, with such ease and expertise, that it is hard to believe that he never got such classical gems of songs before!! Of course, the song is not at all devoid of Western gimmicks altogether, what with the humming and other vocals that bring in some of a Western touch. Besides that, the song totally follows a classical pattern. Arrangements are extravagant in this song, with classical Indian instruments meeting western instruments. Violins, guitars from western music meet shehnais and tablas from Hindustani classical music. Also, those techno sounds sound entrancing in such a composition. I should specify when the tablas enter, and that is, the second antara. When they come, you will definitely get even more hooked than you already were! Lyrics are again spot on, and though they are typically romantic, their simplicity does create an effect. A wonderful, blissful melody by Krsna, wonderfully carried out by Dev Negi. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. O Sathi Mere
Singer ~ Sonu Nigam, Music by ~ Krsna Solo, Lyrics by ~ Raj Shekhar

Yes, I’m very happy to see Sonu Nigam back into the scene after quite some time, with a long song, and something that does justice to his voice, something that only he can pull off. Here, Krsna gets into fulltoo Rahman mode, churning out a divine and entrancing composition, that will appeal only to a certain section of people, but those people will cherish the song like anything! And I fall into that category too! The tune is something that is very, very hard to describe, very hard to grasp due to all of its complexity, but all of Krsna’s hard work ultimately pays off and gives people a song, that really makes them hear it again and again on loop for a long time! Another classical-based romantic song, but this one not simple at all, and a lot more mature than ‘Ho Gaya Hai Pyar’. The mellifluous voice of Sonu Nigam just helps to increase its likability more! Arrangements also steal your breath away, purely traditional, with some interruptions by western instruments occasionally. The strings, flute, manjeeras, matkas and awesome guitars all appeal to the ears instantly! The female backing vocals, quite like Rahman usually does, sounds heavenly. When a song is so good, you really fall short of words, and that’s exactly what has happened to me at the moment. Lyrics are also beautiful, and unbelievably simple, yet making such a huge impact on us. I’m really shocked to know that Rahman hasn’t composed this! Hats-off to Krsna for this gem of a composition, for this glimpse of heaven!! Peaceful, enchanting and deserves to be heard on loop!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

There’s one more song, this one on T-Series music label, because it is a remake of “Sadi Gali” from the first film, ahokse music rights were with T-Series, so of course T-Series follows Saregama’s footsteps! :\

 

♪ Bonus Song

♦ Mari Gali
Singers ~ N.S. Chauhan & Dilbag Singh, Music by ~ SurjRDB, Lyrics by ~ N.S. Chauhan & SurjRDB, Music Label ~ T-Series

So, “Sadi Gali” (Tanu Weds Manu) had been composed by the RDB band, which then consisted of Kuldeep, Surjeet and Manjeet, but after the demise of Kuldeep, Manjeet (you may know him as Manj Musik) left the band to work independently. (We all know how “great” he composes independently). However, Surjeet stayed and wanted to continue RDB on his own. So here he comes, with a remake of the three brothers’ song, “Sadi Gali”. And the remake is nothing compared to the original. Lehmber Hussainpuri’s original song, which was remade efficiently by RDB as “Sadi Gali” in ‘Tanu Weds Manu’, gets remade itself, and from a bhangra number, it transforms into a garba number, with a Gujarati twist. The lyrics are nothing special, neither are the vocals, which are by two Bollywood debutants, N.S. Chauhan & Dilbag Singh. Only the arrangements impressed me, with the wonderful harmoniums and flute, and also the garba beats impressed, but they don’t really sound good with the tune, and the tune sounds broken up and half-hearted in those beats. Not impressive!


Tanu Weds Manu Returns is a quite impressive soundtrack, on the whole. Debutants and guest composers Tanishk-Vayu give the most commercially viable and most quirky track of the album, and score a homerun in their first Bollywood outing itself. On the other hand, Krsna, who debuted with the first film, has explored his talent a lot more with this soundtrack, giving us six great tracks, out of which one is a tad less impressive due to the heard-before tune and feel. But he finally consolidates his career in Bollywood with this. And lastly, and surely the least, Surj doesn’t really uphold the dignity of the band RDB, but at least he’s doing better than Manj. 😂 Overall, the soundtrack is an enjoyable one, full of dhols, heart and soul and gives a good complement to the album of the first film!!! 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Sathi Mere > Ho Gaya Hai Pyar > Ghani Bawri > Banno > Old School Girl (Both Versions) > Mat Ja Re > Move On > Mari Gali 

 

Which is your favourite song from Tanu Weds Manu Returns? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Welcome 2 Karachi, Chefs: Rochak Kohli, Jeet Gannguli & Amjad-Nadeem