THE REMAKE REBELLION CONTINUES! (BAAGHI 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Vishal-Shekhar, Rochak Kohli, Pranaay Rijia, Sachet-Parampara, Bappi Lahiri & René Bendali
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Tanishk Bagchi, Panchhi Jalonvi, Ginny Diwan, Gurpreet Saini, Gautam G. Sharma & René Bendali
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th March 2020
♪ Movie Released On: 6th March 2020

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Baaghi 3 Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 3 is an Bollywood action film starring Tiger Shroff, Shraddha Kapoor, and Riteish DeshmukhThe film is directed by Ahmed Khan and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. Introduction to this film franchise is futile, everyone knows about it and everyone also knows how it is just stretching itself longer than it can hold. Ah, well, going by the reviews, I can see a ‘Baaghi 4’ has bleak prospects, but that is all the more reason for the filmmaker to actually make a ‘Baaghi 4’. Anyway, the film franchise boasted of an all-original album for the first film, followed by a bearable album for the sequel. Here comes the second sequel in the franchise, and in this age of remakes and recreations, I’m not surprised that the first four songs of ‘Baaghi 3’ are remakes! Hoots and cheers for the remake artist Tanishk Bagchi for handling two of these remakes, while Vishal-Shekhar successfully claimed rights to their song ‘Dus Bahane’ and remade it themselves, and Pranaay comes back to recreate his theme song that features in all ‘Baaghi’ films till now. As such, one awaits the original compositions by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli. Let’s see just how well this remake rebellion fares.


Vishal-Shekhar risk entering a multicomposer album in order to salvage their 2005 hit ‘Dus Bahane’ (Dus) which is the opening song for ‘Baaghi 3’. Dus Bahane 2.0 definitely lacks the punch that the original had, and just increasing the tempo of the original track makes the song sound a bit weird, making K.K. and Shaan’s voices sound highly processed. Tulsi Kumar’s portions are awkwardly low in pitch, and composed really uncreatively. That kind of makes me think if Vishal-Shekhar really did contribute any new melody to the remake or just asked Meghdeep Bose to create a ‘Vishal-Shekhar Mix’ or something, of the Tanishk Version. That being said, the beats are well placed, and the song works as a crowd-pleaser, since this is clearly what pleases the crowd these days.

Moving on to Tanishk’s actual remakes, he picks up yet another Bappi Lahiri classic after ‘Yaar Bina Chain Kahan Re’ was remade in ‘Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan’. This time ‘Ek Aankh Maarun’ (Tohfa) gets chosen to be recreated. The song’s catchphrase Bhankas becomes the title of the remake, and all that I notice in the first listen is the good choice of singers — Dev Negi and Jonita Gandhi. They bring the fun of the song to the forefront, and while Bagchi’s beats are just a modern mix of South kuthu beats with that 80s dhakkachika rhythm, the beats kind of work to the song’s favour. Songs like this do not really need their lyrics to be talked about, so I will do just that and go on to Tanishk’s next remake in the album, this time that of a foreign song, Do You Love Me by René Bendali. The song has already been remade by an English pop artist TroyBoi, and now T-Series picks it up for a Hindi reinterpretation. The Arabian setup isn’t new to Bollywood; we have had many original Hindi songs better than this, with the same musical setting. The new compositions with Hindi lyrics barely fit into the hook, but the creativity in the programming and beats makes it worth a listen. Nikhita gets not much space to shine, with very simplistic lines to sing, and before you know it, the song is thankfully over. Also, the Hindi lyricist for the new lyrics hasn’t been mentioned, so I’m guessing it is Tanishk.

Moving over to the franchise theme song by Pranaay, Get Ready to Fight Reloaded, which is probably the most ignored song from every ‘Baaghi’ album, but the makers still seem to be revamping it in hopes that it will get noticed by the audience this time around. The first time, it released as a single after the entire album released, so it went under the radar, while in the second album, it was very badly promoted. And this time, I finally do feel like it will get noticed. First of all, Pranaay packs it with a punch, and some interesting elements like EDM, electronic tablas, whistles, and a groovy beat coupled with Siddharth Basrur’s powerful vocals. The song doesn’t try too hard to be a ‘theme’, as in it doesn’t try too hard to do too much just to stick in the audience’s head, like the previous two versions of it, did. There is also a melodious antara to the song, and Ginny Diwan’s lyrics too make the song worthy of your attention. So this year, we saw the third version of ‘Bezubaan’ in ‘Street Dancer’ failing, but we get to see the third version of ‘Get Ready to Fight’, succeed in the same year. 🙂

Lastly, the two original, melodious songs of the album, one each by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli, two of the music composers that really impressed me with their original music last year. Sachet-Parampara follow their usual ‘Khwabfaroshi’ (Jabariya Jodi) and ‘Dilbara’ (Pati Patni Aur Woh) template in Faaslon Mein, a melancholic Bhatt-ish song that makes you wonder why nobody has taken them to Vishesh Films’ office yet. The piano, intense never-ending lines of singing, followed by a line of singing without any music in the background, and Parampara joining as background vocalist halfway through, the song contains all the standard elements of a Sachet-Parampara song, and that is scary — it means they have been typecast so soon into their career. The song ends with a brilliant strings piece accompanied by a chorus, and even though the composition seems underwhelming, at least Sourav Roy with his arrangements and Sachet with his vocals, have done a good job.

Rochak Kohli brings on board Shaan for his song Tujhe Rab Mana, getting him his second song in the album, if ‘Dus Bahane’ can be counted since it didn’t make him re-dub anything new. The song is a melodious ode to brotherhood, sort of like Rochak’s friendship anthems ‘Atrangi Yaari’ (Wazir) and ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety). However, the song is musically set in a different space, intermediate to both of those aforementioned songs. Not as lively as the former, but not as melancholic as the latter, it finds its niche somewhere in the middle. The composition is sweet and uses the phrase “Tere jaisa yaar kahaan” in its lyrics, so that is enough to strike the brotherly string in Indians. 😂 Shaan delivers the piece with finesse, and Rochak aptly arranges strings, guitars and piano pieces to accompany the composition. However, I wouldn’t voluntarily go and listen to this song, it being around 5 minutes long.


As expected, ‘Baaghi 3’ relies on its remakes to propel it forward. And when the remakes actually do seem to be made and promoted with more efforts than the original tracks, it says a lot. Rochak and Sachet-Parampara’s songs are good but just that. The only great song was the ‘Get Ready to Fight’ remake by Pranaay. An album where not even one song is memorable.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 5 + 7.5 + 6 + 6.5 = 36.5

Album Percentage: 60.83%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Get Ready To Fight Reloaded > Tujhe Rab Mana > Faaslon Mein = Bhankas > Dus Bahane 2.0 > Do You Love Me

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ROCHAK’S Ph.D IN PUNJABI FOLK! (KHANDAANI SHAFAKHANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Badshah, Payal Dev, Jasbir Jassi, Shyam Bhateja & Anand-Milind
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Mellow D, Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Badshah, Gautam G Sharma, Gurpreet Saini, Davinder Khandewal & Deepak Chaudhary
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd August 2019

 

Khandaani Shafakhana Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Khandaani Shafakhana is a Bollywood comedy film starring Sonakshi Sinha, Varun Sharma, Badshah and Annu Kapoor. The film is directed by Shilpi Dasgupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Mahaveer Jain, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba, Divya Khosla Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film revolves around a woman who has to take over her uncle’s infamous sex clinic. The music of the film has been given by the remake expert Tanishk Bagchi, the rapper who is acting in the film Badshah, Rochak Kohli, fresh from the success of his brilliant work in ‘Music Teacher’ earlier this year, and Payal Dev, Who is surprisingly debuting as a composer, making it another mainstream female singer doing so after Kanika Kapoor last year with ‘Chhod Diya’ (Baazaar). So let’s see how this multicomposer album to this film turns out to be.


Music promotions for any film these days start with remakes, and ‘Khandaani Shafakhana’ makes sure it isn’t the norm-breaker. Tanishk Bagchi’s interpretations of old Bollywood super hit songs and/or Punjabi pop songs are a norm these days: another norm this album shies away from breaking.
The album hence starts with Koka, a Tanishk Bagchi remake of Jasbir Jassi’s pop song ‘Koka Tera Kuch Kuch’ from the album ‘Just Jassi’. Tanishk does add his own composition to the hookline from Jassi and Shyam Bhateja’s original, and manages to present us with a catchy and groovy remake. Badshah’s presence in the film warrants a rap from him, while Jasbir Jassi is called to dub the rest of the vocals, and he delivers them in top form. Dhvani Bhanushali, taking the support of oodles of autotune, however, sounds odd; not that singing prowess matters so much in a dance track like this. The beats are catchy, and there’s also a T-Series advertisement thrown in very abruptly in the beginning. If that’s your kind of thing, ‘Koka’ is for you.
Tanishk’s second remake happens to be that of a 90s Bollywood song. Sheher Ki Ladki is a highly unimaginative, though still attractive, recreation of Anand-Milind’s ‘Shehar Ki Ladki’ (Rakshak), with Badshah donning the singer’s cap, obviously coming nowhere close to the original singer Abhijeet Bhattacharya in doing so. His ‘Hi, how are you?’ and ‘How do you do’ sounds so bland as compared to Abhijeet’s (which also features in this song as a bonus addition, I guess, as Tanishk likes to sample the original singers’ voices like Kumar Sanu in ‘Aankh Maarey’ from ‘Simmba’ and Kavita Krishnamurthy in ‘Hawa Hawai 2.0’ from ‘Tumhari Sulu’). Chandana Dixit too, gets her original line featured behind an extremely loud and high-pitched Tulsi Kumar. The latter gets her own original verse too, sounding not as bad! Badshah’s rap is more irritating here than in ‘Koka’, where it actually went with the flow of the song. Also irritating is how Bagchi never lets the hook of the song complete, always interrupting it with that jarring electronic loop that plays so many times throughout the song. A good attempt to revive the song, but people would obviously go for the original!
Apart from acting in the film and rapping in two remakes, Badshah also gets selected to prepare his own original song for the film, which, not surprisingly, tops the two remakes by Tanishk. Saans Toh Le Le is a groovy song with the trademark Badshah beats, but with a retro Punjabi folk twist, a la ‘Naughty Billo’ (Phillauri) and ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ (Veere Di Wedding), both songs by Shashwat Sachdev. The programming really makes the song interesting, especially Tejas Vinchurkar’s folksy flute pieces, and makes the middling composition sound more interesting to listen to. Badshah, along with Rico, deliver the lines well, too, making it an all in all fresh listen.
Payal Dev makes her composing debut with this album, in a song called Dil Jaaniye, a very sweet romantic duet by Jubin Nautiyal and Tulsi Kumar. The composition, though reminiscent of many romantic Punjabi songs Bollywood has churned out over the years, still makes a mark, and especially the mukhda gets you gripped enough to listen forth. Aditya Dev’s arrangements are soothing, the Indian percussions (Chari, Shashi, Mushtaq and Sharafat) taking centre stage, along with the wonderful Pianica piece by Aditya Dev himself. The antara sung by Jubin is great, but the one with Tulsi sounds a bit unnecessary, because it stretches the song a bit too long, and then we have to listen to it in Tulsi Kumar’s double-layered, badly processed voice. Shabbir Ahmed, a rare choice for romantic songs as this, writes functional lyrics. However, the stars of the song are definitely Payal with her composition, Aditya with his arrangements and Jubin with his part of the vocals.
Two more soft songs follow, both by Rochak Kohli. In Bheege Mann, he goes back to the style of music he composed for the songs he did for Luv Ranjan films, ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) and ‘Dil Royi Jaaye’ (De De Pyaar De). The same kind of dulcet melody decorated with guitar riffs, piano notes (arrangements courtesy Aditya Dev) and stray aalaaps, but this time Arijit Singh is replaced by an equally efficient Altamash Faridi, thereby giving the song a rustic touch with his earthy voice. The composition is strong, and will have you enraptured for its entire duration, in spite of its similarities with Kohli’s previous numbers. Gautam G Sharma and Gurpreet Saini write pensive lines to accompany the serious composition, but all-in-all, it is a pleasant song to listen to.
Rochak’s second song, Udd Jaa, is a delight to listen to, because it starts with ethnic strokes of the bouzouki, mandolin and rabab (Tapas Roy), immediately blending into a folksy dholak rhythm, very Rochak-ish (reminding one of ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ from ‘Lucknow Central’!) which is then followed by the beautiful voice of Tochi Raina (where was the man for so long!?) which suits the motivational and inspirational nature of the song so well! Rochak churns out a very creative composition, which sounds straight out of Coke Studio thanks to the gratuitous folk sounds. While listening to this song, I realise how heavily Rochak relies on folk music to make his songs sound rich, right from the initial days (I think he started using it mainly with ‘Mera Yaar Funtastic’ from ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’) to his songs in ‘Hawaizaada’, to the earlier mentioned ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ (Lucknow Central), the beautiful Punjabi romantic song ‘Nain Na Jodeen’ (Badhaai Ho), right to the very recent songs in ‘Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga’. Rochak is incomplete without presenting Punjabi folk music in a very flattering way in his songs! Back to the song, Kumaar’s lyrics in the song suit the inspirational aspect of it, and complement the melody well, and put together, Tochi, Rochak and Kumaar end this album on a high note, with a strong folksy melody!


This album turns out to be one of the better-compiled multicomposer albums by T-Series after a while, the last ones being ‘Kabir Singh’ and ‘De De Pyaar De’ in my opinion! All four composers here try to bring what the movie needs, Tanishk with his mass-attracting remakes with club beats, Badshah with his trademark catchy beats, Payal Dev with her great composing debut and finally Rochak with his astounding use of Punjabi folk music.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 46

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Udd Jaa > Bheege Mann > Dil Jaaniye > Koka > Saans Toh Le Le > Sheher Ki Ladki

 

Which is your favourite song from Khandaani Shafakhana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CRAZY LABEL VS DECENT COMPOSER DUO! (ARJUN PATIALA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa & Akash D
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Priya Saraiya, Benny Dayal & Akash D
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 26th July 2019

 

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Arjun Patiala is a Bollywood spoof comedy film starring Diljit Dosanjh, Kriti Sanon and Varun Sharma in lead roles. The film is direccted by Rohit Jugraj and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Sandeep Leyzell, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s first poster credited Sachin-Jigar for its music, but that culminated in the album jukebox crediting Guru Randhawa and Akash D alongside the duo. How they ended up there and for what, let’s see!


It’s not as much surprising as it is sneaky of the music label to add Guru Randhawa as a co-composer, along with the already capable Sachin-Jigar, in two songs out of their four. Starting with that note, we get a very dull sad song, Dil Todeya, the name of which is quite representative of my feelings after learning that there’s another person along with Sachin-Jigar composing some songs of the film. The song is the standard-issue Punjabi pop song, and surprisingly the only song sung by leading man Diljit Dosanjh, though the rest of the soundtrack does leave plenty scope for him to have sung! Nothing in the composition or arrangements shows that the song involves Sachin-Jigar in any way, but ironically the arrangements are solely by Sachin-Jigar, so maybe they are deliberately this typical, given that the movie is a spoof after all. The only interesting element in the song perhaps is the Qamancha/Kamancheh, an Armenian bowed string instrument related to the violin, performed here by Rasalila, and it sounds wonderful. The lyrics by Randhawa again are standard Punjabi pop sad song lyrics. Diljit renders the song with the required sorrow, but it’s nothing compared to his previous songs in ‘Udta Punjab’, ‘Phillauri’, ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ and ‘Soorma’. Coincidentally, Sachin-Jigar were the first Bollywood composers to use his voice, back when he didn’t act in Bollywood, in ‘Pee Pa Pee Pa Ho Gaya’ (Tere Naal Love Ho Gaya) way back in 2012! Ah well, something has to be sacrificed at the altar of including Guru Randhawa as co-composer. Another coincidence (?) was that Guru’s debut or big break in Bollywood was in an album for which Sachin-Jigar did the original songs — ‘Hindi Medium’, which leads to the third coincidence — this film too was a Maddock+T-Series joint production! Want another coincidence? Sachin-Jigar were the first composers to use Randhawa in a film song, as a singer for a song he didn’t compose, ‘Lagdi Hai Thaai’ (Simran)! Phew!
The second song that the duo composes along with Randhawa though, fares much better, and this time, I contradictorily feel like the song sounds nothing like Guru Randhawa in terms of composition or arrangements! Also, when T-Series released the song, titled Main Deewana Tera as the opening promotional song for the film, they didn’t mention Guru as a composer. Some shady business going on in the crediting of this album. Anyway, Sachin-Jigar (and Guru Randhawa, apparently) create a funky party song (marketed as ‘Ek aur Remix gaana’ with the word ‘remix’ slashed out and replaced with the word ‘Original’) which throws you back to the duo’s own ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), what with the whole R.D. Burman sound (the second soundtrack in a row which harks back to Burman’s music, without remixing it!) It also sounds like Pritam’s ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani) owing largely to the wonderful trumpet solos (Kishore Sodha). Guru Randhawa sounds thankfully well in this one, and along with Sachin-Jigar, he manages to concoct a catchy composition, writes functional but stale lyrics and to top it all, Nikhita Gandhi ends the song with her stray line.
Sachin-Jigar’s third song is one that sounds entirely like something Guru would compose, but to my surprise (or no surprise at this point, since we’ve seen two songs composed by both of them together, both of which sound nothing like a collaboration between the two) Guru Randhawa isn’t a composer for this one! Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda ends up being catchy in parts only, Sachin-Jigar totally imitating Guru’s musical style in the beats, with a very heavy bass line in the hookline, which, by the way, has been composed very catchily. The other great attraction in this song is Benny Dayal’s Arabic interlude (which he has also written, apparently!) The song loses its appeal towards the second verse, though, but Guru’s rendition of Sachin-Jigar’s tune is not annoying, and thankfully keeps him out of his comfort zone, the high pitch, which unfortunately for his comfort, makes us uncomfortable as listeners.
Sachin-Jigar finally get one song without any apparent interference from the music label (except maybe choice of singer). Sachiya Mohabbatan turns out to be a song that seems like a mélange of two super-hit songs from Maddock Films’ last venture ‘Luka Chuppi’ — ‘Photo’ and ‘Duniyaa’. The tune resembles ‘Duniyaa’, while the arrangements resemble ‘Photo’. Again, the fact that the film is a spoof provides some background as to why the music too must have been made like this. Sachet Tandon, getting songs for other composers as a result of his ‘Bekhayali’ (Kabir Singh) gaining more popularity than its Arijit Singh variant, delivers the melody with finesse, his notes and the occasional grunge on point. The flute (Shirish Malhotra) and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) complement the melody well, and the trademark Punjabi pop beats make the song perfect as a spoofy one. The flute is actually what makes it sound like ‘Photo’ in the first place. Priya Saraiya, appearing in a Bollywood soundtrack after quite some time, pens a nice and sweet Punjabi piece, but nothing we haven’t heard before.
To end the album, we have the mandatory daaru from every film that contains a Punjabi lead character, and another mandate that dictates this song is that it is a T-Series Punjabi pop single by Akash D, who therefore becomes guest composer with the song Sip Sip, used as is in the album. Aditya Dev programs and arranges this one, in the most typical way imaginable, and Guru Bhullar along with the composer himself, renders the cheesy lyrics (also by the composer). The opening synth music especially is really banal, making you reluctant to continue at all. If you do manage to continue, however, you’ll quit soon anyway.


An album devoid of the usual quirks of a Sachin-Jigar album, maybe thanks to the dictatorship of the music label involved, this album does witness them give some temporarily enjoyable party tracks and one melodious romantic song, but nothing compared to their previous works with Maddock Films (Go Goa Gone, Happy Ending, Badlapur, Stree)!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 8 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Main Deewana Tera > Sachiya Mohabbatan > Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda > Dil Todeya > Sip Sip

 

Which is your favourite song from Arjun Patiala? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AAI SHAPPAT, A NAADKHULA ALBUM FROM SLB AND TEAM!! (MALAAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Shreyas Puranik & Shail Hada
♪ Lyrics by: Prashant Ingole, A.M. Turaz & Vimal Kashyap
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2019
♪ Movie Releases On: 5th July 2019

Malaal Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Malaal is an upcoming romantic drama starring Meezaan Jaffery and Sharmin Segal in lead roles; the film is directed by Mangesh Hadawale and produced by Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Mahaveer Jain. The film revolves around two youngsters “from different backgrounds who experience the innocence of true love”, as per its official synopsis. In short, it is an everyday Bollywood romance. The film has songs composed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali, and two of his assistants who have been around in the music credits for his directorials for quite some time, Shreyas Puranik (who composed a song for ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Shail Hada (SLB’s usual arranger/programmer). While Bhansali handles the major chunk of the album (five out of seven songs), the other two get charge of one song each. It isn’t everyday that Sanjay Leela Bhansali composes for his non-directorials (in fact, I believe it is the first time he is composing for one of his non-directorial productions), so it will be interesting to see what he offers, especially because he has been in this period/folk musical world for his previous two to three films, so I’m quite excited how he returns to the contemporary setting.


Bhansali’s first song on the album is the techno-tapori dance number Aila Re, an amalgamation of sorts, of ‘Tattad Tattad’ (Goliyon ki Raasleela Ram-Leela) and ‘Malhari’ (Bajirao Mastani). If the cacophonous programming is ignored in this song (which isn’t as easy as it sounds) it has the potential to be a hit among the masses; a catchy hookline is all it needs to catch public attention. Obviously, my attention isn’t grabbed by just a catchy hookline. For me, it is the antara‘s composition that redeems the song for me. The dhols are remnants from ‘Tattad Tattad’ and ‘Malhari’, and that’s where the music gets a bit heard-before and stale. But the other elements like the piano in the prelude and interlude, and the crazy bass and synthesizer sounds, make it listen-worthy, at least once. Vishal Daldani puts his irresistibly grungy voice to good use — the singing by him makes the song suitable for the setting the film is shown to be in. Shreyas Puranik’s Marathi rap is cringeworthy, being a Marathi speaker myself, and could have been avoided. Prashant Ingole’s lyrics are also suitable for the song’s setting; can’t really comment more on that.

Providing much more fun to my Maharashtrian ears is the love song with an aarti backdrop to it, Udhal Ho. The song is a mishmash of cliches from many traditional Marathi numbers, but in entirety, it seems to work as an enjoyable folksy number. Adarsh Shinde, the vocal boombox of the Marathi music industry, finally gets his solo singing debut in Bollywood, and he seizes the opportunity and makes the most of it. His voice texture being so fresh and raw, would provide something new for Bollywood music listeners. The arrangements are traditional Maharashtrian folk arrangements, with the banjo (bulbultarang) and dhols being the most prominent. The comoosition by Bhansali becomes really catchy after a few listens, and the ladies’ choruses in the hookline, interlude and towards the end, where the song detours down a wonderful aarti path (“Dono ka hoga kalyaan…”) provide a fresh touch. The use of the Fu Bai Fu refrain is cool too! Prashant Ingole’s Marathi+Hindi lyrics are refreshing; most Marathi film songs nowadays are a mix of Marathi and Hindi, but it is nice to see so much Marathi in a Hindi film song for once.

Another traditional Marathi-sounding song, Aai Shappat, takes the Koli route, what with the dholkis (Sanjeev Sen) and guitars (Rutvik Talashilkar) being plucked in the Koli fashion. Sanjay Leela Bhansali introduces a new singer, Rutvik Talashilkar, with this one, and he sings the song well, except that he seems to be struggling with his Marathi diction even with the one line of Marathi he sings in this song. The composition of the antara is charming in this song, but something seems forced or missing in the first half. The song is just two and a half minutes long, and is probably the least appealing of all the songs in the soundtrack, composition-wise. Prashant Ingole, once again, pens down very regular but functional lyrics.

The quintessential Shreya Ghoshal song of every Sanjay Leela Bhansali album cones next. Kathai Kathai is a beautiful romantic ballad for the monsoons; Bhansali’s composition is soothing, though very closely overlapping the composition of his own ‘Ishqyaun Dhishqyaun’ (Ram-Leela) in one bar of the song. (Dil pe mandraaye, bhanvre sa woh haaye) You half expect her to sing ‘Ishq yeh tera mera ishqyaun ki dhishkyaun..’! However, the next line “Dekho na dekho na” makes up for it big time. The use of mandolin (Tapas Roy) and flute (Paras Nath) in this song makes it sound all the more beautiful, Jackie Vanjari’s music production making the song stand a class apart. Melody queen Shreya traverses the dulcet melody with ease; then again, when does she ever sound off when it is with Bhansali, her mentor? A.M. Turaz joins Ingole for the lyrics for this song, and the use of the word ‘Kathai’ (meaning ‘light brown’) is an interesting choice to describe the eyes of the heroine’s love interest, because if I am not wrong, it has previously been used only to describe the eye colour of the girl in Bollywood songs — as in Anu Malik’s ‘Kathai Ankhiyon Wali Ek Ladki ‘ (Duplicate) and Sajid-Wajid’s ‘Rabba’ (Heropanti).

The last of the Bhansali compositions happens to be a very pensive and melancholic title song, Ek Malaal. Bhansali’s melody doesn’t flinch from touching the teevra and komal notes, giving it an overbearing haunting quality. The use of strings and the grand Bhansali-esque beats (the song has been arranged by Shail Hada, who arranged most of Bhansali’s latest albums, so that is where that touch comes from) makes the song sound more opulent. The composition of the antara is splendid, Shail handling the aalaaps with perfection. The slow tempo of the song only adds to the suspense and aura of the song, though it isn’t a song I would go and voluntarily play. Prashant Ingole’s lyrics are thoughtful, with the use of the titular word done quite well especially.

After the great singing performance by Shail Hada, we are treated to his entrée as a composer, a soft romantic duet, Zara Suno. The short duration and its adorably captivating composition work in its favour — the song doesn’t get to waste too much time in letting you like or dislike it, and that is what led me to like it, the honest and genuine attempt. Rutvik Talashilkar and Aanandi Joshi are in charge of the vocals, and though Aanandi does a great job (as she did earlier this year in her spectacular song ‘Anand Ghana’ from ‘Anandi Gopal’) with her portion, I couldn’t help but wish the male singer was somebody else. Shail’s composition being so honest and simple, didn’t need grand arrangements, but he tries to give it justice by adding guitars (Shomu Seal) and strings, and the tablas and sitar deserve special mention. Vimal Kashyap writes the lyrics as cute as Shail has composed the song, completing the package as a cute and simple affair, all in all.

Having saved the best for the last, Shreyas Puranik’s Nadhkhula seems to be the best romantic song I’ve heard in a long time, and just how I like it — a perfect mix of Indian instruments and a melodious tune. Shreyas sings the song himself, and his voice is brilliant; we did get a sneak peek of it towards the end of the Payal Dev-led ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani), but this seems to be his first full-length solo song. As soon as it starts, with the piano and ethnic strokes (Tapas Roy), it evokes some kind of magical feeling that seems all the more magical because of the rains. The melody is decorated with sounds of running water, and a beautiful percussion loop (Prashant Sonagra and Mayank Shankar) props the hookline to a pedestal that just places it higher than the hooklines of any other recent Bollywood song. The interlude has a beautiful flute solo by Tejas Vinchurkar, and the flute follows into the antara, which by the way, is one of the most impeccably put together set of notes I have come across in a long time. But the real goosebumps moment is when you hear the Marathi chorus coupled with Vinchurkar’s flute towards the end of the song — which is when it really hits you, what a magical song you had been listening to for the past three minutes. Prashant Ingole’s lyrics are interesting again for the use of the word Nadhkhula, a Marathi slang word used to denote something awesome. This song would be the qualitative and musical equivalent of ‘Nainowale Ne’ (Padmaavat), in that it is in essence a ‘rainy season song’, if you know what I mean!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 8 + 6.5 + 8.5 + 7.5 + 8.5 + 9.5 = 55.5

Album Percentage: 79.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Nadhkhula > Zara Suno = Kathai Kathai > Udhal Ho > Ek Malaal > Aila Re > Aai Shappat

 

Which is your favourite song from Malaal? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AN ALBUM WHICH GROWS ON YOU IN SLOW MOTION!! (BHARAT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal-Shekhar, Julius Packiam & Ali Abbas Zafar
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Ali Abbas Zafar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th May 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 5th June 2019

Bharat Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Bharat is a Bollywood film starring Salman Khan, Katrina Kaif, Disha Patani, Sunil Grover, Tabu, Nora Fatehi, and Jackie ShroffThe film is directed by Ali Abbas Zafar and produced by Atul Agnihotri, Alvira Khan Agnihotri, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Two previous films that salman Khan did with Ali Abbas Zafar had music by Vishal-Shekhar, and it isn’t a surprise that they are retained for the third collaboration as well. Both the previous albums, which were on YRF Music, were a mix of entertaining and experimental music, so here’s to hoping that Bharat too, features such a mix of entertainment and experimentation. Also, background scorer Julius Packiam, along with director Ali Abbas Zafar, has composed one theme song for the album. Let’s dive right in! 😊


        Vishal-Shekhar open the album with the quintessential Salman Khan crowd-pleaser song, and I’m glad to inform you, that this sing has pleased this reviewer as well! Slow Motion is a song that ironically took no time to grow on me, a song that I started humming right away after I first heard it. The infectious energy the song carries can be attributed to the duo’s amazing work at the composition and arrangements, Meghdeep Bose’s upbeat programming and arrangements, and the top-notch singing by the vocal powerhouses Nakash Aziz and Shreya Ghoshal. Now, it isn’t the first time Vishal-Shekhar have equipped Shreya in her vivacious and bubbly side, but it sounds so different from their previous collaborations with her! First of all, her lower register provides an amazing touch to the song, which makes you want to listen till the end. Nakash, as always, sings at the top of his lungs and aces it. Meghdeep Bose’s arrangements consist of a contagious tune played first on a plucked string instrument and then on rock guitars (Warren Mendonsa and Meghdeep Bose) that starts the song off on a very catchy note. It is followed up by amazing percussions by the usual group — Dipesh Verma, Omkar Salunkhe, Keyur Barve, Khwab Haria and Shikhar Naad Qureshi — with an amazing interlude midway through the song. The duo’s composition though, is what makes the song so catchy; without that hookline, this song would not be much despite all the booming sounds. Irshad Kamil is made to pen standard Bollywood massy lyrics — the hookline makes one smile, but the rest, especially the antara, makes one cringe. Well, lyrics can be ignored, can’t they?
Of course, after the crowd-pleaser dance number, next on the template of a ‘Salman Khan music album’, comes a romantic number made for Arijit but not sung by Arijit. Chashni happens to fit into this category, a dreamy lullaby sort of song, that harks back to ‘Dil Diyan Gallan’ (Tiger Zinda Hai), only with some of its compositional movements — it is very hard to notice. Overall, the duo’s composition is a very happy-go-lucky one, with a playful vibe; the hookline having a guitar groove to it that makes it irresistibly hummable. Said guitar (played by Aman Moroney, also one of the programmers of the song) repeats throughout the song along with a matka-like sound, making the sing sound earthy. Again, Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are the standard Hindi-Punjabi mix that has infested Bollywood of late, nothing great. What deserves special mention, though, is the singing by Abhijeet Srivastava. The man, one song old (‘Aapse Milkar Achcha Laga’ from ‘Andhadhun’) gets the essence of the song beautifully, and does a much more impressive job than he did in his debut; this will probably be his most memorable song, his big break. Vishal-Shekhar also add their standard V-S strings in the interlude (a quite short interlude, at that, but wait, there’s just the tiny guitar groove where the second interlude should be, so I guess the first interlude is long in comparison!) and those strings hark back to their own songs ‘Naina’ (Gori Tere Pyaar Mein) and again ‘Dil Diyan Gallan’ (Tiger Zinda Hai).

‘Chashni’ appears in a Reprise Version as well, as is the norm in an Ali Abbas Zafar-Vishal-Shekhar-Salman Khan album. Ironically, all three songs ‘Jag Ghoomeya’ (Sultan), ‘Dil Diyan Gallan’ (Tiger Zinda Hai) and ‘Chashni’ (Bharat) had three different singers but their female versions are all sung by Neha Bhasin. Hubby Sameer Uddin is in charge of producing this one, and his guitars and plucks add the same vibe as we heard in her songs in ‘Sultan’ and ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ too, so I am guessing he produced them there too, but YRF doesn’t give that kind of credits, so there’s no way to know! 😐 The bass in this version is booming, it really gives a beautiful earthy feel, and I kind of wish this arrangement had been used for the male version, because Neha Bhasin disappoints with her rendition this time.

Also expected for an Ali Abbas Zafar-Salman-Vishal-Shekhar collaboration, is a Sukhwinder Singh song. Little did we know that this time we would get not one, but two songs. So, the first is Turpeya, a song which has Vishal-Shekhar give an EDM spin and makeover to their own ‘Dard-e-Disco’ (Om Shanti Om). This song, I got bored of in 2 minutes when I first heard it because of the tedious composition, but it has an interesting soundscape (courtesy Abhijit Nalani). The only song on the album devoid of any live instruments whatsoever, it has the programmer doing quite well with the sound — the Punjabi percussion going on throughout is a bit monotonous, but the sounds which start the song off are really interesting, especially the Oud-ish sound followed by the santoor in the mukhda. Sukhwinder, as expected, delivers the song with spunk, but I just wish the composition were better.
And I get what I wished for in Thap Thap, which also starts with an intriguing digital sound. The song progresses with an intriguing tempo crank-up, and by the time it comes to the hook, it brings a very catchy bass portion, followed by an amazing live percussion portion and a nice strings portion that is clearly digital but still manages to grab your attention. Sukhwinder’s energy is top-level here too, and Vishal-Shekhar do not dilute the energy in a four and a half minute-long number; they smartly end the song at under three minutes. Nicely done!

Zinda is what we would expect as the theme song, and here the listeners are given in to a little surprised, which is that the song has been composed by the background music director and the film director in collaboration! Julius Packiam and Ali Abbas Zafar present a spunky theme song, a song that carries motivation with it very effectively. Starting with a great rock guitars with a chorus to accompany it, the song finally dips into a very melodious portion led by Vishal Dadlani, in his strangely sweet but at the same time grungy voice. The lyrics, also by Zafar, are aptly inspirational and motivational. The background has a cool bass line, and that rock guitar just doesn’t fail to keep impressing you throughout!

Back to the Vishal-Shekhar part of the album, we have two situational tracks left (not like the former half of the album wasn’t situational — barring ‘Chashni’ and to an extent ‘Slow Motion’, all the songs are more or less situational) One is a dance track, in two versions, and the other, my favourite song of possibly the year.
If you know me, you know I’ll leave the favourite for the last. So let’s talk about the dance song. 😁
Starting off with a very quirky ladies’ chorus led by Neeti Mohan, Aithey Aa immediately reminds one of ‘Baby Ko Bass Pasand Hai’ (Sultan), but here it is clear from the lyrics that Salman’s character is not going to be doing monkey business in the song video as he did in that song. 😂 The catchy chorus leads to Akasa’s wonderfully commanding voice, singing more catchy lines, coupled with Vishal-Shekhar’s cool EDM music (yes, even though that part of the film is set in 1983, but sigh, Bollywood just doesn’t understand anymore). The drop after the ‘Oh Aithey Aa‘ is infectiously catchy, but I wish I could hold a grudge for it being an electronic drop in a period film. Alas, I can’t! I’m enjoying it! 😂 Kamaal Khan’s antara first sounds odd because he is clearly auto-tuned or something of that sort, but it later sounds alright. Thankfully, he gets just two lines and then hands the mic back to Akasa and Neeti. What I don’t understand is whether Neeti has also sung some lines in the main melody, or if she is only singing the ladies’ chorus in the background.

The Dance Version of the song, ridiculously named, as if the former wasn’t capable of making me break into a dance (it sure was), wins my favour, not only because it is more creatively imagined, but because it had me liking more, a song which I had already liked in its initial version. *I hope the previous sentence made sense. Please read it again and again if it didn’t.* This song has Vishal-Shekhar adding more playful arrangements like a tabla and dholak section (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen and Madhav Pawar) in the antara, a booming percussion section in the “closer aa” section and the drop tune, instead of being played digitally, has been relayed to a shehnai (Yogesh More), so you can imagine my happiness at how the composers have exercised full artistic freedom in this version — which seems like a ‘music dircector’s cut’ kind of version — I’m glad it made it onto the album. The other major difference between this version and the first, is that the main melody is handed over to the male singer completely, and this time the singer is also better — Nakash Aziz. The way he sings the “kurbaan” before the hook is amazing. Meanwhile, Neeti reprises her “Hand pump” couplet here as well. I wished to hear a little more of her in this version, but I guess the tablas and desi percussions more than made up for it. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics here in both versions, at least showcase some quirk and intelligent humour and are not standard Bollywood crap like ‘Slow Motion’.

And now for my favourite song of the first half of 2019. AND THIS IS A BIG MAYBE, but I’m not embarrassed to say that I love this song infinitely. Aaya Na Tu is one of the best made songs — with a tangible completeness to it. A song which has almost nothing missing — right from the vocals, to the intricate arrangements, to the beautiful, beautiful, and beautiful composition, this one is a winner all the way. The first time I heard it, I knew it needed more time to be assessed, and was I right. The more I listened to it, the more magic it unraveled on the way. Jyoti Nooran in her lower register is an auditory pleasure, it kind of makes me think she can sing all the songs in this pitch, which Rahat Fateh Ali Khan sang a bit too high-pitched, and it would sound beautiful. (Ahem, ahem, I’m looking at you, Mr. Rashq-e-Qamar!) Vishal-Shekhar’s intricate composition, most probably based on classical music, is decorated with beautiful arrangements by Meghdeep Bose. The percussions again, are the highlight of the song. Dipesh Verma and his team have done a splendid job here, but Jai Row Kavi joins them on the drums to give it more depth, the drums hitting home right at the perfect moments in the hookline. Indian sounds like shehnai (Yogesh More) and Tablas and Dholak (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen and Madhav Pawar) give the song that rustic and homely feel. I’m guessing the lyrics are somewhere in the context of patriotism, and as such it reminds one of Amaal Mallik’s ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift), which wasn’t so rich with its percussion, but had the brass section working wonders for it. Here too, a stray trumpet features. The backing vocals are vast, and you can’t talk about the sing without mentioning them. All the biggest names from the Bollywood backing vocalists have come together for the backing vocals — Marianne D’Cruz, Neumann Pinto, Bianca Gomes, Vivienne Pocha, Shazneen Arethna, Rajiv Sundaresan, and Francois Castellino. And of course, if you didn’t notice Vishal Dadlani’s vocal humming in the beginning of the song, please go and immediately check it out again!! That is the part that makes you want to start listening to the song again, and then obviously, you can’t just stop because it is followed up by such a good song after that intro! So yes, that was my favourite song of the album, in all its intricacy and poignancy.


Vishal-Shekhar keep up the good work in their Ali Abbas Zafar-Salman collaborations, with this album sounding a bit weaker at first listen, but unravelling a series of wonderful observations as we listen to it more! An album that grows in slow motion! 😊

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 9 + 8 + 7.5 + 7 + 8 + 8.5 + 8.5 + 9 + 10 = 75.5

Album Percentage: 83.89%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaya Na Tu > Aithey Aa (Dance Version) = Slow Motion > Aithey Aa = Zinda > Thap Thap = Chashni > Chashni (Reprise Version) > Turpeya

 

Which is your favourite song from Bharat? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

REMAKE-GIRI, BAHUT HUI, THAK GAYI HAI ABB JANTA!! (LUKA CHUPPI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, White Noise Studios, Abhijit Vaghani, Tony Kakkar, Goldboy, Dilip Sen, Sameer Sen, Gurmeet Singh & Bob
♪ Lyrics by: White Noise Studios, Anand Bakshi, Nirmaan, Tony Kakkar, Mellow D, Harmanjit, Kunaal Vermaa & Raja
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd February 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 1st March 2019

Luka Chuppi Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Luka Chuppi is a Bollywood film starring Kriti Sanon, Kartik Aaryan, Pankaj Tripathi, Aparshakti Khurrana, and Vinay Pathak. The film is the directorial debut of Laxman Utekar, and is produced by Dinesh Vijan. The film is a social comedy revolving around a couple who decide to enter a live-in relationship, and the problems they face from their relatives and the society in general. The music from Maddock’s productions has usually been good, though there was a slight dip in the quality of the music in Sachin-Jigar’s album to ‘Stree’. Well, here, the music is credited to multiple composers, including Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture White Noise Productions, last heard in ‘Laaj Sharam’ (Veere Di Wedding), Abhijit Vaghani, and the lead ‘composer’ (read remake artist) Tanishk Bagchi. I just call him the lead remake artist, because the other two composers, too, have presented recreations, and coupled with Bagchi’s three remakes, that makes this album full of remakes. So basically, my review is going to be like a race where remakes are pitted against each other: knowing fully well that they have almost zero chance to cross the finish line.


Right from the beginning of the opening track of the album, Poster Lagwa Do, the Sachin-Jigar vibes hit you square in the face. The beats, distinctively similar to those of ‘Johny Johny’ (Entertainment) give away that this song has been worked upon by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R company, White Noise Productions (though i suspect it has been ghost programmed by the duo themselves, because of their close association to Dinesh Vijan). Anyway, the song, which is a remake of Dilip-Sameer’s ‘Yeh Khabar Chapwa Do Akhbaar Mein’ (Aflatoon), rides on the success of ‘Simmba’s ‘Aankh Marey’, in that the makers rope in Mika Singh to do the honours with the male vocals. Well, it doesn’t work half as well as it did in the former song, and another reason for that may be because the female singer there was a more effervescent Neha Kakkar as opposed to an amateur-sounding Sunanda Sharma here. One of the singers who I’d actually like to see the female portions of the song to have been sung by, though, is Nikhita Gandhi, who is instead relegated to an embarrassing two lines of rap that are easy to miss! The composition, though kept intact, gets new lyrics for the antara, and the lyrics have been credited to White Noise Studios too — I wish Sachin-Jigar would follow Pritam’s JAM8 when it comes to crediting individual artists (though their lack of individual credits just makes me believe stronger in my theory that they are the men behind all the music credited to White Noise and just don’t want to be named because of the album being a multicomposers album!) That said, the song is levels below any previous Sachin-Jigar presentation; the beats are dated, there’s no originality or innovativeness in the programming and the song ultimately lacks appeal and repeat value.
The other ‘guest’ composer, Abhijit Vaghani, presents his take on Akhil’s song ‘Khaab’, originally composed by Bob. Duniyaa is a pleasant recreation of the already present original romantic song, with completely different lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, replacing Raja’s lyrics from the original. The new lyrics are sweet, and the new composition for the antara too, is appreciated. Akhil has been roped in to sing this version as well, which is a good choice, as the singer of the original also gets his Bollywood break in the bargain. Dhvani Bhanushali sings the female portions alongside him, and does quite a good job too; she sounds much better in low notes here (though clearly autotuned), than she does in high notes in songs like the recently released T-Series pop single ‘Main Teri Hoon’ by Sachin-Jigar. The flute is quite melodious, and is one of the features taken from the original. Thankfully, the beats of the original, which were quite passable, have been changed and made to sound a bit more melodious, with guitars and strings accompanying the composition.
Tanishk Bagchi, who ‘composes’, or ‘recreates’ the next three songs of the album, starts off with Coca Cola, a funky and more glitzy touch to the original by Tony Kakkar. Of course, Neha Kakkar gets to pitch in, and while her brother’s original composition’s tempo is cranked up quite considerably, she gets to sing a new antara, which seems to end as soon as it starts. Again, the choice of retaining the original singer’s voice is a commendable move. Tanishk’s programming saves the song; it’s uptempo beat and strings make it a fun one-time listen — unfortunately, it is not so fun that I would press the repeat button. There is that infectious digital beat that starts the song off though, and it thankfully plays for quite some times for those who loved it. To Tony Kakkar’s original lyrics are added some new lines by Mellow D — the lines sung by Neha Kakkar and the rap by Young Desi. Obviously enough, this is going to be the next club anthem though, for lack of anything better these days.
Tanishk goes on to present another love song, named Photo, this one being a remake of Karan Sehmbi’s ‘Photo’, composed by Gold Boy. Again, the singer is retained, and again, I commend that decision. Tanishk’s beats are really basic though, and provide nothing new to the original song — which was already sufficiently catchy if this was supposed to be catchier. The flute is a nice attraction, but the original had guitars, which I am missing here. The short length of the song keeps it thankfully not boring, but the repetitive composition by Gold Boy would not have been so pleasant if it had gone on for longer. The singer Karan Sehmbi has a nice folksy texture to his voice, which explains why T-Series backed him for a pop single, and agreed to let him sing its remake, which wasn’t the case three years ago when ‘Soch Na Sake’ (Airlift) was sung by Arijit Singh. Nirmaan’s lyrics are cute, with the lyricist also throwing in a clever self-reference in the second verse. A melodious song, but loses appeal because of the digital beats, which makes it sound more like a pop song than a film song.
The last song, Tu Laung Main Elaachi, a remake of ‘Laung Laachi’s title track by Gurmeet Singh, is probably my least favourite of the album. And there are quite a few reasons for that. First of all, a really sweet Punjabi song sung by a really good Punjabi singer, Mannat Noor, has been redubbed by Tulsi Kumar — the first bad choice. Second, the beats have been degraded in sound; there is no freshness in the song as one should expect from a recreation. It sounds like the song has just been recreated for the sake of doing so. The chorus singers at the beginning and the end are nothing short of irritating! The bass has been increased in the recreation, though, it seems, and wow, I’m sure that required a lot of effort! :/


Luka Chuppi is the result of the remake trend in Bollywood going far overboard. I am not sure how the makers always come up with stupid reasons to justify their including remakes in their albums, but I’m sure nothing can justify completely avoiding original music in your album! Atleast for the sake of art, and music in general, if they would have planned out the music of this album less hastily, maybe it would have been better. And it isn’t like these remakes are great, either! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 = 32

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Duniyaa > Coca Cola > Photo = Poster Lagwa Do > Tu Laung Main Elaachi

Which is your favourite song from Luka Chuppi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PRODUCERS KA HALKA HALKA GHUROOR!! (FANNEY KHAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series / ‘Badan Pe Sitare’ on Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th July 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd August 20181400x1400bb3

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Achche Din Ab Aaye Re’: Saavn

Listen to ‘Badan Pe Sitare’: Saavn | Buy on iTunes


Fanney Khan is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Anil Kapoor, Pihu Sand, Rajkummar Rao and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan in crucial roles. The film is directed by Atul Manjrekar and produced by Rakeysh Om Prakash Mehra, Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kussum Arora, Nishant Pitti, Anil Kapoor, P.S. Bharathi and Rajiv Tandon. The film is an adaptation of the Dutch film ‘Everybody’s Famous’, and it deals with the issue of body-shaming. The music of the film has been composed by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition, (#NotARemake) by Tanishk Bagchi. This is Trivedi’s fifth album of the year, and out of the four previous ones, ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ and ‘Pad Man’s were the only solo albums, whereas in ‘Raid’ and ‘Blackmail’, T-Series had forced songs by other composers. Thankfully, in both the albums, the guest songs weren’t bad or frustrating. In fact, in ‘Blackmail’, it was Trivedi who wasn’t at the top of his game. Well, seeing as to how this album is 6/7th his, maybe this will be one of the better ‘multicomposer’ albums of his this year. Let’s dive in!


As is the norm, I usually get the guest composition done with at the beginnjng, or leave it for the very end; here, I will get it over with. So Tanishk’s guest composition Mohabbat, which has left many confused as to whether it’s a remake of Noor Jehan’s ‘Jawaan Hai Mohabbat’, (but which clearly isn’t a remake of that, if you pay attention to the tune), starts the album off. And it is one of the most disappointing original songs by Tanishk. First of all, he creates some weird sounds that hurt the ears, and continues it with grating programming of Sunidhi’s voice that makes her sound horrible! The composition is quite simple, and a bit catchy on and off, but for the most part, it is a very forgettable tune, that could’ve been propped up by Sunidhi’s vocals, if the composer hadn’t programmed it so badly! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are nothing great, and when the song isn’t interesting, the lyrics don’t really matter that much.

Amit Trivedi too, uses Sunidhi for his first song, Halka Halka, an EDM reimagination of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s famous Qawwali. The difference in Sunidhi’s voice itself shows you what Tanishk had done wrong in the first song. Anyway, the song as a remake, is quite creative — the composer adds a pacy drop to the song after the hookline, and I love the new padding he has composed before the hookline, as the mukhda; it has a beautiful tune, which Sunidhi delivers fascinatingly. However, I didn’t quite like that the hookline has been extended to four lines. The original hookline with two lines was good enough! Divya Kumar complements Sunidhi well, and against the EDM backdrop, both of them, a duo not yet tested by composers, sound magical, and I’m glad Trivedi did try such a contrasting pair for a song.

Trivedi is also made to remake Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi’s iconic Badan Pe Sitare and who better than Sonu Nigam to sing a version of that song? We’ve been hearing the man sing his take on the song ever since I can’t even remember when, and to hear a proper mixed and mastered audio version of him singing the song is a treat for his fans. Amit Trivedi does an awesome job recreating the actual raw orchestra touch of the original song — drums and trumpets owning the arrangements. And obviously, Sonu Nigam owning the song with his energetic and boisterous performance!

The original part of the album is not as exciting as the remake part, sadly, but Amit still manages to give one beautiful song, Achche Din, which has a sweet middle-class touch to it, in both lyrics and tune. Amit’s heartfelt rendition helps the song sound genuine as well, and it suits the setting of Anil Kapoor playing a taxi driver waiting for his fortune to get better. Irshad KamilsK lyrics have a sense of genuineness in them, which propels the song further and Amit’s use of clarinets (I.D. Rao) and flutes is wonderful. But what keeps the song together is the strong composition. The reprise version type of song, Achche Din Ab Aaye Re is the same audio file with a little additional coda at the end, where the lyrics have been tweaked to let us know that Anil Kapoor’s character’s fortune has sparkled.

The rest of the album is sung by Monali Thakur, who is the voice for Pihu Sand, who plays Kapoor’s daughter in the film. The first of the songs, Tere Jaisa Tu Hai, is straight out of the ‘Secret Superstar’ soundtrack, with a less stronger voice than Meghna Mishra. Monali Thakur seems to be struggling with the high notes in this song; the song itself has nothing new to offer beyond the soaring trumpet portions, but then, we heard something similar in ‘Main Kaun Hoon’ (Secret Superstar), so it doesn’t strike me as anything special. Irshad KamklsK lyrics are meaningful, but only good to listen to as long as the song plays; they are easily forgotten after the song ends.

The last song Fu Bai Fu is like those Bollywood medleys that used to feature in our movies, except, since the music label might not possess rights to all the songs, the composer has composed a song and the lyricist sprinkles different lyrics throughout that tune. The songs featured are quite fun to listen to, but nothing beyond that. The use of the Marathi folk song ”’ Bai Fu’ merely raises eyebrows — why was it needed? And was it needed? The arrangements are some of the most bland arrangements Trivedi has provided in recent times — a repetitive loop of the same sounds plays all throughout the song. Monali’s rendition is good in this song, though, and so are her imitations in the interlude. But again, why?


The whole album seems like the producers were way too overconfident with their movie, and in the process, their halka halka ghuroor seems to have made them pay no attention to the quality of the music album! A letdown of a music album for a movie that revolves around music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 7 + 7 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 6 = 

Album Percentage: 67.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Achche Din = Achche Din Ab Aaye Re > Badan Pe Sitaare = Halka Halka > Tere Jaisa Tu Hai > Mohabbat = Fu Bai Fu

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 30 (from previous albums) + 02 = 32

Which is your favourite song from Fanney Khan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂