MUSIC KA MAIDAAN FATEH NA HO PAAYA! (SANJU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman, Rohan-Rohan & Vikram Montrose
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Shekhar Astitwa, Puneet Sharma & Rohan Gokhale
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 29th June 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 29th June 2018

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Sanju Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Sanju is a Bollywood biopic starring Ranbir Kapoor, Paresh Rawal, Manisha Koirala, Dia Mirza, Vicky Kaushal, Sonam Kapoor, Karishma Tanna, Jim Sarbh and Anushka Sharma among others. The film is directed by Rajkumar Hirani, and produced by him along with Vidhu Vinod Chopra. We all know how Sanjay Dutt features in almost all of Hirani’s films, save ‘3 Idiots’. However, Hirani says he never got to know him personally until one day he started talking about all his hardships during an emotional breakdown. That lit a lamp in Hirani’s mind, and he decided to make a biopic. Now, I can’t comment on the movie as I haven’t watched it yet, but I can sure do a music review, right? 🤣 The music of the film has been composed by three composer entities (one being a duo), Rohan-Rohan, Vikram Montrose and A.R. Rahman. It’s surprising to see Rahman first of all in a multicomposer album, because whenever he did those in the past, it was because he left midway due to other commitments. But here, he was the last addition reportedly! Rohan-Rohan have two songs, and it isn’t their Hindi debut; that happened four years ago with ‘Mumbai Delhi Mumbai’, but it is Vikram’s Hindi film debut — he has done some Hindi pop songs and a Marathi album called ‘Bhay’, which was mediocre. Also, I’ve noticed that Hirani uses music as a prop to take the story forward, but not even in the way other filmmakers do (they’ll have a song play in the background and all). No, Hirani will have a full-fledged four-minute song sequence, but it’ll make the moment fun and enjoyable. However, the music itself isn’t always up to the mark. His favourite film album of mine is ‘Pk’, because the music actually was good there. Let’s check out how the music is with ‘Sanju’, though you might already know by my review’s headline. Sorry. I’m dimwitted that way.


Rohan-Rohan are the ‘chosen ones’ who get to begin this album. And they do it in quite a quirky manner too! Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya is a song that is supposed to be an old song that the character are singing in the 80s, so the song is composed like a 50s nok-jhhok number. It starts with a wonderful opening prelude, which instantly sucks you into the 50s. Sunidhi’s voice modulation is fantastic, and is obviously one of the best vocal renditions of the year. Sonu Nigam, in comparison seems weak, but I wonder, since he can mimic so well, why didn’t he sing in a nasal tone, as well? He still has sung in one, but it could’ve been more pronounced I feel. Rohan-Rohan’s composition is fun, but takes some time getting used to. And Puneet Sharma’s lyrics are very quirky and funny, especially the part when they talk about ‘family planning’ or rather, the lack of it. The song somewhat addresses Sanjay Duty’s commitment issues, and it’s the typical Hirani way of presenting a serious topic in such a flippant and casual way.

Rohan-Rohan’s second song doesn’t fare too well. Bhopu Baj Raha Hain tries to start with a retro sound as well, trumpets blaring, bhopus belting out weird noises, but it soon transcends into a very weird zone. Nakash Aziz was the obvious choice for the song, and I must say Rohan-Rohan’s arrangements are enjoyable, but I’m sure nobody will listen to this song again. There’s not magnetism or attractiveness to it. The antaras are poorly structured, and I’d never expect this song to be in any big commercial film. The worst part is that this is a Hirani film. Though the duo has tried to create the Hirani zone in this song as well, I feel it could’ve been less effervescent. The lyrics by Rohan Gokhale and Shekhar Astitwa are just a bunch of words you never think much about.

Vikram Montrose, the debutant, also starts off his share of the album with a song that everyone would love because of the motivational touch, the powerful vocals and the inspirational lyrics. Kar Har Maidaan Fateh does carry thag irresistibly moving sound, I agree. The choice of Sukhwinder Singh wasn’t surprising, but the choice of Shreya Ghoshal was surprising, and the way she sings is even more surprising — she sings quite lower than she usually sings. She shines even then, though. Sukhwinder Singh’s parts sound almost heard-before and nothing new, but because of the freshness Shreya brings through her low pitch, the song reaches different levels of awesomeness. Vikram arranges is quite standardly, with rock guitars, percussions, and drums. However, the violin playing the hookline in the interludes, is amazing. Also, the composition took some time to grow on me, but when it did, I couldn’t get it out of my head. All in all, it was a good debut for Montrose.

His second song Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya, is hinged on the quirky lyrics by Puneet Sharma and Rohan Gokhale. Papon brings a different, rough texture to his otherwise smooth voice, but I enjoyed Ranbir’s parts more. And Supriya Pathak (not the one you’re thinking of) sings her lines quite funnily. The groove and gun sounds throughout the song have been overused so many times in so many gangster movies in Bollywood, that it sounds boring here. The song is also unbearably long, at just under than 5 minutes. However, I’m sure this song is for the theatres.

And then enters A.R. Rahman, who gets two songs too. Ruby Ruby starts with that irresistible bass line, followed by the wonderful guitars (Keba Jeremiah) and a grungy voice keeps whispering “Rrrrrubyy”. When the actual melody starts, you are initially confused, and the song takes some listens to get used to, but since it depicts Dutt’s drug addiction phase, I think it’s deliberately composed like that — so many lines repeating so many times; there’s actually three discernible different parts in the song that keep repeating over and over. And it sends us into a trance. The percussions are amazing too, as are the strings! Shashwat Singh masters the grunge very well, and I especially loved the part when he does the descension from ‘Tu bhi, ruby, ruby…’. Poorvi Koutish is a capable backing vocalists, and her ‘la la la’ is so haunting, it sucks you in.

Speaking of haunting, Rahman’s next song Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo is just that. A sensuous composition, rendered just perfectly by Nikhita Gandhi, the song immediately has you hooked. It has a number of lines ending with high notes, which Nikhita holds so wonderfully. The rhythm Rahman employs in the background is intriguing, and reminds you of ‘Muskaanein Jhoothi Hai’ from ‘Talaash’ with the shakers, the subtle percussion, and very muffled strings that give the song an even more sensuous atmosphere. Irshad Kamil writes lyrics that suit the ambience of the song, and I feel that the song itself can transport you to the moon. Also, Nikhita hums so brilliantly at the end of the song. 😍


Sanju turns out to be the weakest Hirani album for me, due to the meaningless quirks from the newer songs by the younger composers, that just brings the album down. The music field has sadly not been conquered by Hirani this time.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 5 + 8 + 6 + 8.5 + 9 = 44.5

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी< सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo > Ruby Ruby > Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya = Kar Har Maidaan Fateh > Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya > Bhopu Baj Raha Hain

Which is your favourite song from Sanju? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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WON’T BECOME AS PHAMOUS AS IT DESERVES! (PHAMOUS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sundeep Gosswami, Surya Vishwakarma & Krsna Solo
♪ Lyrics by: Puneet Sharma & Naveen Tyagi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 18th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

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Phamous Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Phamous is a Bollywood action comedy starring Jimmy Shergill, Pankaj Tripathi, Shriya Saran, Jackie Shroff, Mahie Gill and Kay Kay Menon. The film is directed by Karan Lalit Bhutani and produced by Raj Khatri. The film has music composed by Krsna Solo, Sundeep Gosswami and Surya Vishwakarma. The latter two composers are debutants, while Krsna is a well known name, from whom we expect great music. Let’s see whether our expectations are met!


Krsna gets to open the album with the the electrifying desi rock number that Bandook is. The film is situated in the Chambal region of Madhya Pradesh, so a full-on gangster track was expected, but what wasn’t expected was that Krsna would produce a twist in the tale with the addition of the electrifying rock elements. Right from the opening ad-lib by Vishal Dadlani, followed by the entry of those rock guitars, you know that you would love the rock in this song. And of course, with the powerhouse that Vishal is, the composer can rest assured that his song will be rendered beautifully and with the right amount of spunk. Puneet Sharma’s lyrics are perfect, calling the gun as the daughter of iron! The composition too, is really catchy, and it doesn’t sound forced, and especially doesn’t sound like the composer has made some extra effort to make the tune match the rock. The grunge in Vishal’s voice, the energy of the guitars, the energetic percussions and the catchy tune, all fit in place to make an effective gangster theme song for the Chambal region.

Sundeep Gosswami and Surya Vishwakarma collaborate to produce the sweet romantic number Dil Beparwah, a song which, surprisingly, marks the first duet of Jubin Nautiyal and Jonita Gandhi! The mandolin with which the song starts instantly sucks you in, with a strong oriental touch, and when Jubin starts off, instantly evoking memory of Sonu Johan’s such romantic songs, you get goosebumps. Rather, I did. Sundeep-Surya’s tune is strong, arrangements are sweet, and that’s why the vocal prowess of Jubin and Jonita seems to have magnified. Yes, the music is quite standard of an affair and nothing too innovative,but sometimes it’s really soothing to hear such a simple romantic song, especially when the arrangements and vocals are spot on like this. Jonita especially sounds great. Naveen Tyagi’s lyrics describe the feelings of young romance really well, and I really loved the second interlude where the composing duo adds beautiful mandolins. The second antara sounds like an unnecessary add-on though, making the song too long for no reason. Anyway, it’s one of the better romantic songs we have got in a long time.

The dance number Titri sees Sundeep go solo, and the song he creates is like a rustic answer to Pritam’s ‘Tukur Tukur’ (Dilwale). Again, Sundeep does a great job with the quirky and rustic ethnic strings, which sucks you in right from the beginning. The backing vocals by him are just as fun, accompanied by quirky rabaabs and harmoniums, not to mention the wonderfully quirky sound effects. The singer Priyanka Negi debuts, I believe, with this song, and it is truly one of the strongest debuts this year! She owns the song and how! I also commend the lyricist Puneet Sharma for presenting a song of this genre without making the lyrics vulgar or anything. Last year, Gaurav Dagaonkar gave us ‘Aye Saiyan’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) which was a similar song, but a recreation. As such, this stands out because of it being original, yet providing a similarly quirky and rustic touch. The composition of course, is catchy, and everyone who hears it is sure to groove along until it is over. Fortunately the song isn’t short.


The album to this film is surprisingly great, with three songs that do two things right — fit well with the script and setting of the film, and are catchy as standalone tracks as well. Sadly, the album won’t become as Phamous as I think it deserves!!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8.5 + 8 + 8 = 24.5

Album Percentage: 81.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandook > Dil Beparwah = Titri

 

Which is your favourite Song From Phamous? Please vote for it below! Thanks!☺️

5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

HOPE TO HEAR MORE OF RUPERT’S MUSIC!! (HOPE AUR HUM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rupert Fernandes
♪ Lyrics by: Saurabh Dikshit
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st May 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

Hope Aur Hum Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Hope Aur Hum is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Naseeruddin Shah and Sonali Kulkarni, directed by Sudip Bandyopadhyay and produced by PVR Pictures and Thumbnail Pictures. The music for this film is given by newcomer Rupert Fernandes, so let’s wait no longer to see how he scores in his debut!


Rupert Fernandes opens his debut album in Bollywood with a groovy title song. Hope Aur Hum works because of its catchy arrangements, composition, and the hook which repeats so many times — almost like a commercial jingle. The composer provides nice padding though, around the hookline. I must say that the song gets repetitive towards the second half, because of the mainly whispery nature it has been sung in. Speaking of which, Bhoomi Trivedi and Suraj Jagan are the perfect choices for such type of vocals. The arrangements consist of engaging rock guitars, drums, and the nice banjo-ish plucked instrument. Saurabh Dikshit’s lyrics suit the children’s movie theme, but that doesn’t mean adults won’t appreciate them too!
Sonu Nigam’s Acche Bacche Rote Nahin is another song where the hookline is repeated a time too many, but the song still hits the nail on its head, because of the way it handles the emotional quotient. Rupert doesn’t make it too melodramatic, and it works just well enough to be an engaging listen throughout! Sonu Nigam’s different variations of the hookline is one reason why the repetition of the line doesn’t matter too much! When you have a performer like Nigam, you can have only one line and repeat it all throughout your song; as if it’ll matter, because he’ll do the rest! Saurabh Dikshit’s limited lyrics still manage to do well in the ‘sad song’ genre, where lyricists usually just beat around the bush, rinse and repeat. I loved Rupert’s addition of engaging guitar riffs throughout the song; it’s the only instrument in the song, and oh, how wonderful it sounds!
Shaan’s Aye Zindagi happens to be the star song of the soundtrack; Dikshit’s verse “Aye zindagi, khelenge phir kabhi, aaj mood nahin hai!” hooks you instantly, and thankfully, Rupert accompanies Dikshit with a just as cute composition to go with the words. Again, guitars feature as the prominent (maybe only) instrument in the song, and the vocalist is depended upon to do the rest — Shaan manages that quite easily! It is a pleasure to hear him in a song he deserves, after a long time! And I commend the composer for roping him in, when the ideal choice would be Arijit Singh or Mohit Chauhan! Anyway, it is another case where the best song is saved for the last! 🙂


A short and sweet soundtrack; I can only hope we get to hear more of Fernandes’ music in the future, because this one will probably, sadly, go unnoticed!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 7.5 + 8 = 22.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aye Zindagi > Acche Bacche Rote Nahin > Hope Aur Hum

 

Which is your favourite song from Hope Aur Hum? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

SADLY, NO EMOSANAL ATYACHAAR!! (BLACKMAIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Badshah, Guru Randhawa & Preet Hundal
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Badshah, Guru Randhawa, Sabi, DIVINE & Dhaval Parab
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 6th April 2018

Blackmail Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Blackmail is a Bollywood dark comedy, starring Irrfan Khan, Kirti Kulhari, Arunoday Singh and Divya Dutta in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Delhi Belly’ fame Abhinay Deo, and produced by Abhinay Deo, Ramesh Deo, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Now, the film’s music has been given by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition each by Badshah and Guru Randhawa. Let’s see why I found that the two guest songs were better than Amit’s songs here!!


Now, who knows what blackmailed Amit Trivedi into accepting an album with two songs by other artists, something I believe he has never done after a certain point in his career! Anyway, he starts his part of the album with a pulsating, electrifying rap song Badla, an ode to the underdogs in the world, who wish to take revenge on the people who’ve been unfair to them. The song starts off entertainingly, with Amit singing in his trademark robotic voice, making the song actually sound as if it’s sung by one frustrated with the ways of the world. It’s the rap by DIVINE though, that lifts the song up and makes it what it is, and I’m glad Bollywood has started getting actual rap songs this year, starting from ‘Mukkabaaz’s ‘Paintra’. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics for the melody portion are functional; nothing great, but DIVINE and Dhaval Parab do a better job for the rap lyrics. Everything else like the techno sounds, is just as expected in a rap song.
Bewafa Beauty doesn’t work as much as the first song; Amit seems to be trying to hard to make it sound like a 90s song just because Urmila Matondkar features in the video! The singing by Pawni Pandey is jarring at places, and the whole song as such doesn’t sound at all like an Amit Trivedi song. The lazy pace of the song and its neverending length makes it seem all the more boring. The arrangements too, are typical for such songs — there is no innovation in the synth sound, the dholaks, and it ends up sounding just mediocre. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are the only high point of the song; they summarize the story of the movie in five minutes.
Nindaraan Diyaan starts as a nice sad song with a pleasant acoustic backdrop, very similar to Amit’s ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) that came earlier this year. Amit’s own voice works wonders for the song, and it gives vibes of the signature Amit Trivedi sound. But when the song breaks into rock for the entire second half of the song, it seems unnecessary and loud — it would’ve been better, had it been restricted for an interlude and not till the end of the song. Just like ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’, Amit adds a soothing backing chorus that finds its way through the mist of the rock and manages to soothe the ears. The lyrics again, by Bhattacharya, are the highlight of this song that sounds like any other Trivedi song, and has nothing much working for it other than that.
Trivedi’s last song Sataasat is a quirky song, again, falling in the trademark Trivedi quirky zone, but again, it fails to impress, even with its jazz sound, the slurred vocals of Trivedi and Amitabh’s lyrics. It joins ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ in being a “good, but not quite there” song. I can’t even see myself revisiting these four songs anytime in the near future, which is unfortunate, because Amit Trivedi was in great form last year, and to see him give an entire chunk of songs with none standing out, is disheartening.
Surprisingly, or maybe not, the mass caterers please my sensibilities even more. Badshah’s Happy Happy really manages to make you feel happy, with the signature Badshah techno loop, and groovy rhythm, not to mention Aastha Gill’s playful vocals. In fact, the portions sung by her are some of the best in the song. The lyrics are just alright for this kind of a song, but at least the song manages to make an impression and stay in the mind.
Guru Randhawa’s Patola is less memorable, but my personal favourite. That cheesy 90s sound, which he adds to Preet Hundal’s pop single ‘Patola’, to transform it from a typical Punjabi pop song, into a catchy wedding song, really works! The similarity to ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium) is forgivable, mainly because Guru takes out Bohemia’s rap, and adds his own touch to the lyrics, to tweak them as per the requirements of the movie. The same cheesy sound that ‘Ishqyaun Dhishqyaun’ (Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela) carried, this song too carries, and in such an innocuous way, that it does create an impact.


Once again, who knows what blackmailed Trivedi into signing such an album where he was to share the field with two immensely popular hit makers, who end up surpassing him too, this time, as unbelievable as it sounds. Sadly this album is devoid of the usual Trivedi ’emosanal atyachaar’!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 8 + 7 + 8 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Happy Happy = Patola = Nindaraan Diyaan > Badla > Sataasat > Bewafa Beauty

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 01 = 19

Which is your favourite song from Blackmail? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT QUITE BLACK SHEEP ANYMORE!! (BAA BAAA BLACK SHEEP – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan), Jaidev Kumar, Sajid-Wajid & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Sunil Sirvaiya, Rajesh Manthan & Jalees Sherwani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd March 2018

Baa Baaa Black Sheep Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baa Baaa Black Sheep is a Bollywood comedy film starring Maniesh Paul, Manjari Fadnnis, Anupam Kher, Kay Kay Menon Annu Kapoor in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishwaas Pandya and has music by Superbia, which is Gourov-Roshin-Shaan’s band. They have given one full album in the past (‘Coffee with D’) which was terrible, but this one seems to be slightly better! Let’s see!


Superbia’s stint in music composition continues after the cringeworthy album to “Coffee With D” (2017). This time, they start the album off with much more promise, recreating a sort of medley that T-Series calls ‘Mixtape’. They recreate Abhijit Vaghani’s recreation/amalgamation of Galla Goriyaan/Aaja Soniye, the two original songs respectively by Harbhajan Mann (a pop single) and Sajid-Wajid (from ‘Mujhse Shaadi Karogi’). I must say, the song works to whatever effect the makers wanted. It is an enjoyable Punjabi club number rendered surprisingly enjoyably by Mika Singh, and Kanika’s voice is as always, addictive. I just wish ‘Aaja Soniye’ had more parts in the song than it does. Harbhajan Mann’s composition to ‘Galla Goriyaan’ does the rest of the work, making this an enjoyable dance song.
Heer, the romantic song, is also surprisingly well sung by Mika Singh, who has sung such numbers in the past, and should sing them more often. Not that it is a soulful number, but still softer than the songs he’s known to sing, like the previous song on the album. Mahalakshmi Iyer is heard after a long, long time, and is pleasant to the ears. The only fault if any, in this song, is the irritating repetition of the hookline, which almost demolishes whatever fun we were having listening to it. The arrangements are nice, with amazing guitar work, but not never-heard-before. Lyrics are functional.
The song that tries to be its own “Ek Do Teen” (Tezaab/Baaghi 2), except this time, counting age instead of days, is Angelina, a typical 2000s type of song sung very 2000s-ishly by Sonu Nigam. The effect of the Latino touch in songs has been wearing off these days, and it just makes them sound dated. The vocal onomatopoeia is just cringeworthy, too.
Then there are two songs that up the quirk quotient, except one does it the right way and the other, the bad way. Baa Baaa Black Sheep is as cringeworthy as a title song can get, sounding contrived at every note. Shaan sings like he had no choice, and the female backing vocalist just sounds weirdly happy singing whatever lines she’s given. The lyrics are just bad, so there’s no point of talking about them.
Ram Leela, on the other hand, had me in splits when I heard it for the first time, especially because of the hilarious “dhikichyaoun” after every hookline. 😂 This one has to be heard to understand, and all I can tell you is that it’s kind of a spoof of the Ramayana with enjoyably funny lyrics.


Superbia’s second full album turns out to be balanced between bad and good, but largely just an album that you’ll forget after listening to it, if at all you stumble upon it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 5 + 4 + 6 = 31

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Galla Goriyaan / Aaja Soniye > Heer > Ram Leela > Angelina > Baa Baaa Black Sheep

 

Which is your favourite song from Baa Baaa Black Sheep? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Baa Baaa Black Sheep) = 17

THE LYRICISTS’ SUCCESSFUL RAID!! (RAID – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir & Indraneel
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 16th March 2018

Raid Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Raid is a thriller starring Ajay Devgn, Saurabh Shukla and Ileana D’Cruz, directed by Rajkumar Gupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak. The film is about India’s longest raid in the 1980s, and I’m sure all of you have already watched the film; blame my laziness for the late music review. Anyway, the music has been composed by Tanishk Bagchi and Amit Trivedi, both having composed (rather Tanishk having recreated and Trivedi having composed) two songs each.


Once again, T-Series taps into the remake-producing compartment of Tanishk’s brain, but this time, the results are actually not bad! Two Qawwalis of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan have been chosen by the makers here, and Tanishk recreates each of them with finesse and most importantly, respect. Sanu Ek Pal Chain, a soft romantic number, turns out to be the polar opposite of the horrendous ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ (Baadshaho). Tanishk learns from his mistakes and this time the soul of the original song is kept intact. Tanishk’s composition skills are also tested here, because he makes his own antara, and does quite well at it too. The arrangements are similar to how Arko arranges his love songs, with the acoustic sounds being more prominent. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s rendition is great, and thankfully not ear-piercing like ‘Baadshaho’, and the lyrics by Manoj Muntashir hit the right note.
If “Sanu Ek Pal” was remade well, Nit Khair Manga‘s makeover is splendid, and Tanishk shows some real creativity there. Again, Rahat and Manoj join hands with him for the vocals and lyrics respectively. But if you notice, Tanishk has many more original lines to compose here, and apparently has much more freedom to do what he wants, and it results in some mind-blowing arrangements. The hookline is the peak of the song, where Tanishk starts off with the typical Sufi tabla rhythm, only to stop it, and start it again. It continues in this stop-start fashion all throughout! The trend of playing the hookline on the mandolin is followed here, too, but it sounds great here, and not contrived like it does everywhere else. Rahat manages the vocals beautifully, his nuances on point and very intricate.
Amit’s half of the album is purely situational. What Amit couldn’t probably do, they made Tanishk handle, and what Tanishk probably can’t do, they let Amit handle, as he is, after all, a senior to Tanishk, and knows how to create situational songs!
Black is like the theme song of the movie, but Amit Trivedi gets the 80s setting of the film spot-on in his arrangements for this song. Sukhwinder handles such songs amazingly, and he does so here too. Since the song is situational, it doesn’t grow instantly, but the peak of the song is surely the high pitched line before the hook. The hook, trademark Trivedi stuff, is something that will set your head nodding in its rhythm. The interlude is entertaining too. Indraneel’s lyrics suit the theme well; I guess he is a debutant, have never seen his name as a lyricist before! Amit’s percussions are top-notch, and the trumpets help give the song an authoritative feel.
The other Trivedi song, Jhuk Na Paunga, is your everyday Bollywood patriotic song, but oh, does it work in its intent. Comparisons to ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift) are inevitable, but in its own place, the song works well. It starts off with a typical Trivedi guitar riff followed by a typical Trivedi trumpet piece, and as soon as Papon’s feathery voice kicks in, so do your goosebumps. The mellow hookline is enough to melt the heart of anyone who regards himself a staunch nationalist. Again, the percussions and brass instruments are the highlight of the arrangements, but Amit adds a wonderful tabla rhythm in the antara, which will steal your heart. The chorus towards the end of the song is fascinating — “Toofan Mein Jalti Hui…“. It is small touches like this that make this the best song of the album, but the main reason, is Indraneel’s lyrics. Though the composition might be inaccessible for many of the masses, nobody can say they didn’t connect with the poignant lyrics.


Both the music composers do equally well here, but the lyricists raid the music and take away the spoils!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 7.5 + 8.5 = 31.5

Album Percentage: 78.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Jhuk Na Paunga > Nit Khair Manga > Sanu Ek Pal Chain = Black

 

Which is your favourite song from Raid? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Raid) = 15