DEBUTANTS HIJACK THE ALBUM FROM NUCLEYA!! (HIGH JACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar
♪ Lyrics by: Akarsh Khurana, Vibha Saraf, SlowCheeta & Rajat Tiwari
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

High Jack Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


High Jack is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film starring Sumeet Vyas, Sonalli Seygall, and Mantra Mugdh, directed by Akarsh Khurana and produced by Phantom Films and Viu. The trailer makes it seem like a movie that requires insanely quirky music, and the music is by multiple composers. Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar are composing for this album, and barring Nucleya, all the other composers are debuting with this album. So, fasten your seatbelts as we take off on this flight that is the album of this film!


Nucleya starts off the album with probably the freshest song I’ve heard in a while, Behka. The song starts with a pleasant guitar strum accompanied by a fresh EDM sound, that runs all throughout the song, and Nucleya does a nice job not making it boring, even though the song runs for four minutes! Vibha Saraf sings one stanza at the beginning, and the same one towards the end; barring that, the song is completely EDM — and good EDM at that! Nucleya is great at this kind of stuff, and it’s nice to see a Bollywood producer actually letting him make it. Anurag Kashyap directed his energies into making a high octane rap song earlier this year in ‘Mukkabaaz’, and now he (because Phantom produced the film) lets him do his signature EDM, which turns out mind blowing.
Nucleya’s other song Aapaatkaleen, is a short theme song with dialogues by the cast members, and another catchy and groovy EDM rhythm, and fun sound effects. It’s nice to see Nucleya get experimental with sound in a Bollywood film.
Anurag Saikia’s Bollywood debut happens with another experimental track, the best of this album, Prabhu Ji. The song appears in two versions. Both versions have the same arrangements, but just sung by two different singers, Asees Kaur and debutant Suvarna Tiwari.
The Asees Kaur Version will definitely be the radio’s favourite, while music lovers would love the Suvarna Tiwari Version, because of the classical singing talent she possesses. At the end of the day, both versions are enjoyable. Anurag Saikia’s composition is a winner, because it is an efficient bhajan-like tune, and the amazing fusion with Electronic music is a wonderful touch, making the song sound extremely fresh. The lyrics by director Akarsh Khurana are great, and intentionally (or unintentionally?) funny, because in such a film you know this isn’t going to be a real bhajan situation, so the lyrics sound all the more quirky!
SlowCheeta and Shwetang Shankar step into Bollywood with Kripya Dhyaan De, another song with some sick electronic programming, especially with the bagpipes. There isn’t much by way of composition here, as it is primarily a rap song, but that too, has been done tastefully. However, it isn’t something that you’ll think of much after listening to it. It’ll play and get over, and you’ll forget about it soon. That’s not saying it isn’t catchy though, and the composers have given it a nice soundscape.
The last composer Rajat Tiwari, also debuting with this album, presents his song Happy Ending Song, also in two versions. Both the First Version and the Second Version go completely acoustic and say so too, in the lyrics by Akarsh Khurana. (“Electronic music kaafi sun liya, isiliye acoustic bajaana hai“). The composition itself is enjoyable, feel-good, much like the rest of the songs in the album, and again the arrangements and vocals are done well. Taaruk Raina is a great find, he sings the song in a charming way in both versions, and while Sumedha Karmahe accompanies him (sounding as usual like she could have sounded better) in the first version, Manasi Mulherkar (sounding like Shefali Alvares). The lyrics are enjoyable and suitable for the end credits scene.


Barring one song, the album is completely high on electronic music, but more than that, it is a launchpad for four talented composers, who kind of hijack the album from Nucleya!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 8.5 + 6 + 7 + 7 = 52

Album Percentage: 74. 3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Prabhu Ji (Both Versions) > Behka > Happy Ending Song (Both Versions) = Aapaatkaaleen > Kripya Dhyaan De

 

Which is your favourite song from High Jack? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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