A MUFFLED SOUND EXPLOSION!! (PARMANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Srivastava, Dr. Kumar Vishwas, Sachin Sanghvi & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Parmanu Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Parmanu is a Bollywood drama/thriller film starring John Abraham, Boman Irani and Diana Penty, directed by Abhishek Sharma and produced by Zee Studios, JA Entertainment and Kyta Productions. The film revolves around the 1998 bomb test explosions conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan under the leadership of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam during PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s tenure. The film has opened to mixed reviews, but what had me most excited about the film (since the subject matter isn’t really the kind I like) was the music by Sachin-Jigar. Well, Sachin-Jigar and Jeet Gannguli, as I learned after the album released.


Sachin-Jigar April start the album off with a refreshing song Shubh Din, which follows the folksy Gujarati/Rajasthani template to the tee, but still manages to turn out as an entertaining number. They recreate their own ‘Aavi Re Hoon Aavi Re’ (from the Gujarati movie Carry On Kesar), and the song has a catchy instrumental loop after the hookline, which Sachin-Jigar have made sure, hooks the audience. The arrangements give the impression that the makers were going for something grander, but had to settle for less than what they intended. The folksiness doesn’t come out full-fledgedly as one would expect from Sachin-Jigar, but ends up sounding muffled. The vocals by Keerthi Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri are amazing though, as is Sachin-Jigar’s composition, so at least the song is entertaining for as long as it plays.
The next folksy number by Sachin-Jigar, Thare Vaaste, is like a patriotic recreation of their song ‘Chunar’ (ABCD 2), especially lyrically. Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics are aptly poignant and patriotic, but sadly, the composers’ tune doesn’t match up to that level; it fails to move the listener. The anthemic tune gets repetitive after some time, and though Divya Kumar does well in trying to make the song sound energetic, it is again the fault of the muffled-sounding arrangements, that the song doesn’t come to life as would be expected.
Kasumbi, the best song of the album, also sees the duo follow the folksy template, but this time Vayu’s lyrics are Punjabi, in a film set in Rajasthan. This one starts off like another ‘Chunar’ spawn, but soon sets in as a moving patriotic number — the shehnaai is the most remarkable instrument used here; it harks back to the old patriotic songs. Again, the arrangements sound muffled here too (what’s with the poor programming throughout the album?) but Sachin-Jigar’s tune is so strong, it can be overlooked. Also, Divya Kumar gives an amazing performance, especially in that gem of a hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are beautiful, incorporating the word ‘Kasumbi’, which is probably the name for the saffron colour associated with patriotism in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
The last two songs composed by Sachin-Jigar in this album, have soothing tunes and less of a folksy impact than the previous songs. Sapna is the trademark Sachin-Jigar romantic melody (a la ‘Meet’ from ‘Simran’) in its composition, but the lyrics by Sachin Sanghvi are not romantic at all. Overall it is a pleasant listen, which Sachin-Jigar doing their signature method of repeating an instrumental loop after the hookline. (The loop in this song sounds a lot like the one in ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ from “Meri Pyaari Bindu”). Arijit Singh is himself in the song, and carries it off like he carries off every song he’s ever carried off. The guitars are enjoyable and soothing, and the sarangi is beautiful, and the song itself is fortunately short — any longer and it would’ve been too long.
The last song by Sachin-Jigar, De De Jagah, is yet another in the same vein as ‘Sapna’, but this time, the lyricist (poet and politician Dr. Kumar Vishwas) complements it with romantic lyrics. What strikes me right away, yet again, is that something is wrong with the mixing, making Yasser Desai’s voice sound like it has been recorded on WhatsApp. Sachin-Jigar’s vibrant composition is one of the best of theirs over the period of 2016-2018, and Yasser Desai, barring the bad use of his vocals, tries to do his best, and succeeds fairly enough. The guitars and tablas complement each other surprisingly well, and the harmonium provides the soul in the song. The tune of the hookline is what will get you hooked to this song, just like songs traditionally are supposed to do.
Now, the reason I described that as Sachin-Jigar’s last song, is because there’s a kind of guest composer we have in the album; he has been waiting patiently for his turn, and I’m more than happy to talk about his song. The man in question in Jeet Gannguli, who has somehow bagged a romantic (read Mohit Suri-like sob-inducing) song in a movie like this. Jitni Dafa is one of those songs we have heard enough of in Bollywood, and I can’t believe the makers would proactively damage their own music album by including such a song in the album. It starts off painfully simple, and until those ‘Aashiqui 2’-ish beats start, it isn’t that painful, but when they do start, you keep waiting for the song to end. Rashmi-Virag write great lyrics, but hey, I’m quite sure John’s character in the film has time to weep like this at such a critical time and dire situation. And the singer is Yasser Desai, trying his best to be a mix of Mustafa Zahid, Arijit Singh, Saim Bhatt and Atif Aslam.


Parmanu has a soundtrack that mostly sticks to the point (barring that guest song) but something is definitely wrong with the arrangements; if they had been better mixed and mastered, the sound would’ve been grander and more enjoyable!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 39

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kasumbi > Shubh Din > De De Jagah > Thare Vaaste = Sapna > Jitni Dafa

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 19 (from previous albums) + 01 = 20

Which is your favourite song from Parmanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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NOT TOO JUNGLEE, BUT JUST RIGHT!! (DIL JUUNGLEE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Anand-Milind, Sharib-Toshi & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arafat Mahmood, Guru Randhawa, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Vayu Shrivastav, Devendra Kafir & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: T-Series / Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: The music hasn’t released as a full album
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Dil Juunglee

Listen to the T-Series songs: Gaana

Listen to the Pooja Music songs: Gaana


Dil Juunglee is a Bollywood rom-com starring Saqib Saleem and Taapsee Pannu in lead roles. The film is directed by Aleya Sen and produced by Jackky Bhagnani and Vashu Bhagnani. The film’s music is by multiple composers — Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Sharib-Toshi and Abhishek Arora. All of these composers have given something listen worthy in the past, and their style of music suits the romcom genre very well, so it’s probably going to be a fun music album.. let’s see!


Now, this album is somehow split between two music labels — T-Series, and the newly-conceived Pooja Music (belonging to Vashu Bhagnani’s Pooja Entertainment) whose digital marketing is being done by Sony Music. The makers probably wanted a remake of ‘Gazab ka Hai Din’ to feature in the album, but since its rights were with T-Series, that song had to be on T-Series as well, right? Because, obviously! And so I guess the Guru Randhawa song was a bonus add-on, like a ‘Buy one get one free’ kind of deal. So yeah, that’s how I guess this album ended up being on two different music labels. Anyway, since that has nothing to do with the music, let’s move on!
The first song on the T-Series part of the album happens to be composed by Guru Randhawa, along with co-composer Rajat Nagpal, the composers of ‘Ban Ja Rani’ (Tumhari Sulu) and ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium). While his previous songs in Bollywood have been rehashes of his pop singles, Nachle Na is an entirely original song, and no prizes to guess that it is his best and least contrived-sounding song in Bollywood.. (At the moment of writing this review, ‘Kaun Nachdi’ from “Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety” hadn’t released, which I now believe to be his best yet.) The beats are groovy, and the electronic loop, though harking back to ‘Aa Toh Sahi’ (Judwaa 2), is quite fresh-sounding. Vocals are good, and I’m surprised Neeti Mohan, of all singers was chosen for this song; she does a brilliant job, and surprises me at the same time. It is the lyrics that fall flat.
Now of course, since Guru Randhawa didn’t remake his own song, the music company had to call in someone who could remake some other song. So we have the more-than-part-time remake artist Tanishk Bagchi presenting Gazab Ka Hai Din, a remake of the song with the same name from ‘Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak’. I must say, he has done a good job providing the padding around the old hook; the mukhda is especially beautiful, but the antara is forgettable. But the addition of the old hook sounds so contrived, the beauty of the song ends there. For me, the mukhda of this song is the only memorable part! I wish he had been allowed to build a new song after this mukhda and not borrow from an old one! Jubin and Prakriti sound functional as always; nothing great in either of their renditions. The strings during the hookline are beautiful, they keep your interest intact through the boring parts of the composition. I also noticed that Tanishk has written the lyrics as close as possible to the old song, thereby keeping a small touch of it alive even in the new composition.
However, Tanishk’s other song Beat Juunglee, which features in the Pooja Music part of the album, is an amazing and instantly catchy one, and though he uses the iconic “Yaahooo!” from Shammi Kapoor’s ‘Chahe Koi Mujhe Junglee Kahe’ (Junglee), I’m happy that he hasn’t been made to recreate that number, because his original composition in this song is so insanely catchy!! Armaan Malik was the best choice for this, and the results show brilliantly. Prakriti Kakar gets not much to do, but does well in her one or two lines. Most insane though, is the programming by Tanishk, which has been getting better day by day. The electronic loop which starts the song is crazy and so are the percussions and horns throughout the song. Vayu’s lyrics are always entertaining and they are just that here as well. It just goes to show you how well Tanishk can actually compose when given the freedom. (As if last year’s ‘Shubh Mangal Saavdhan’ wasn’t proof enough!)
Sorry for rambling about that song, but the next song, by Sharib-Toshi, Bandeya, deserves just as much praise. Now this composer duo hasn’t been in the picture for a long time. And by in the picture I mean the way Tanishk is constantly in the picture, every month. The last song they composed was in the recently released “Fukrey Returns”, and now they return with another Punjabi song, this time a sad song sung by Arijit Singh. The composition is soulful, the arrangements heart-warming and the lyrics by Devendra Kafir amazing. The composition has the feel of Anu Malik’s ‘Mere Humsafar’ (Refugee) but the similarity is only in the first line of the hook. Arijit himself is quite at ease with this kind of a song, and is his usual soulful best.
The second best song of the album, after ‘Beat Juunglee’, has to be Abhishek Arora’s Dil Jaane Na, an amazing fusion track that starts off as a soft romantic number, but segues into a pumped-up electronic number with a groovy beat to it. Seasoned voices like Mohit Chauhan and Neeti Mohan are the perfect choice for the song, and they deliver well. I love the way composer Abhishek Arora makes the seamless transition from the soft portions of the song to the upbeat ones, and not just once but numerous times throughout the song. All in all, this song is a treat for people who like light and fluffy music!


The album was “Juunglee” after all, but I loved the Pooja Music part of it much, much, much more than the two songs on the T-Series label. Some things are just meant to be less “Juunglee” and hence less likeable than others!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7 + 9 + 8 + 8.5 = 39

Album Percentage: 78%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Beat Juunglee > Dil Jaane Na > Bandeya > Gazab Ka Hai Din > Nachle Na

Which is your favourite song from Dil Juunglee? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 10 (from previous albums) + 01 = 11

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

SACHIN-JIGAR STAY GROUNDED!! (BHOOMI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Anvita Dutt, Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 28th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Bhoomi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bhoomi is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Aditi Rao Hydari and Sidhant Gupta in lead roles. The film has been directed by ‘Mary Kom’ and ‘Sarbjit’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Sandeep Singh. The film is a revenge saga revolving around a father trying to avenge his daughter, who is a rape victim. Now, this filmmaker Omung Kumar, has been known for making loud and sobby dramatic films, but also, both of his previous films have had amazing music albums as well, featuring in the Music Mastani’s Top 20 Albums of the respective years they released in. While ‘Mary Kom’ featured music by newcomers Shashi-Shivamm, and ‘Sarbjit’ featured a nice mix of T-Series-affiliated artists (Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli), and newcomers Shail-Pritesh, this time Omung raises the bar by roping in highly busy composers Sachin-Jigar. Now this is probably the first time I remember seeing the duo compose for a drama like this, so it’ll be something new for them and for us. But expectations are still sky high because of Omung! So let’s see how far above the bhoomi (ground) Sachin-Jigar’s music flies!


1. Trippy Trippy

Singers ~ Neha Kakkar, Benny Dayal, Brijesh Shandilya & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s fifth album of the year starts off with a song I can’t believe they have made!! The song is a club song with a composition that I would expect from someone like Badshah or Yo Yo Honey Singh, and not Sachin-Jigar! The composition is very weird, and not in the good way. It is basically just a typical item song composition, and coming from Sachin-Jigar, that is quite shocking. The male portions especially, are very disappointing. Those are actually the parts that could’ve been the best. Also, the antara is quite similar to their own “Teri Mahima Aprampaar” (Entertainment). The hookline is just Badshah belching out the words in an expressionless tone. Here, it is evident the composers were trying to experiment, just to make the song sound a bit better, but sadly, they couldn’t make those experiments work. For example, the flute and dhols arrangement was clearly done to increase the quirkiness of the song, but it backfires, sadly. The beats too, aren’t addictive or anything — it is just a straightforward song to listen to and forget. The vocals by Neha Kakkar are very disappointing after that amazing rendition of hers in ‘Ghungta’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz)! Here she doesn’t even sound half as energetic as she did there! Benny Dayal and Brijesh Shandilya (and of course Badshah) are used very less, and their portions are just repeated over and over. Good, because those parts are very irritating. Also, the ‘Hicky hicky’ sung by Neha is kind of irritating too! The lyrics by Priya Saraiya are the usual fare we get to hear in such songs, and nothing really makes sense. A song that must be a mistake!!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Lag Ja Gale

Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Next up, the composers present a romantic song, very saccharine-sweet, and following a Sufi template to the tee. Again, it is shocking that Sachin-Jigar’s music gets so predictable, but let’s not complain just yet. The composition here is very beautiful, and doesn’t take time to like. The mukhda and antara are especially very beautiful. It is the hook line “tere mere pyaar nu“, that is very predictable and sounds out of place, in an otherwise beautiful song. I can’t remember which, but it sounds an awful lot like a very famous 90s song too. The presence of Rahat almost impeded me from liking the song a lot. His voice has been making songs heavy and inaccessible these days (Like it did for ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ from ‘Baadshaho’), but thankfully, Sachin-Jigar have employed his voice prudently, and not overdone the high pitch or the aalaaps, and it comes out very beautiful. The “Rab Varga” loop gives the song a very unconventionally abrupt start, and it’s one of the best effects of the song. The arrangements by the duo are the trademark Sufi dholaks and tablas, but because of the composition, you bear with it. Also, a wonderful sarangi keeps you engaged throughout the song! The major part of the song also has acoustic guitars, making it a kind of fusion between Sufi and acoustic guitars. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are very cute, and very simple-sweet. A rare song by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan that will be known for simplicity! I wish there was some innovation though, as it has turned out very predictable!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Will You Marry Me

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

After two slightly disappointing songs, Sachin-Jigar get to make a wedding song for the film. Now, this song seems to be one of those disappointing songs which grow with time, because that’s what happened with me. I found it a bit weird at first, but in the successive listens, I started to like it bit by bit. Now this is purely subjective, but I still think Sachin-Jigar didn’t try to make this song (or any song from this film) complicated and layered, and that’s why this is happening. The songs are straightforward, something we hardly get from Sachin-Jigar, and that’s why we might be disappointed at first. Anyway, the composition is a peppy wedding number, complete with Punjabi phrases and effective Indian wedding arrangements. The hookline seems very cheesy at first, but becomes catchy later on. The beginning is quite entertaining, with those dialogues, and after that, Jonita’s weird programmed voice singing something gibberish, I believe. That is one of the best parts of the song. The female chorus too, is very entertaining, and the word “ponga pandit” specifically caught my interest. Lyricist Anvita Dutt has utilised it so nicely. As the hookline gets closer though, the song increases its heard-before-ness, and it becomes an ordinary wedding song by the time the hookline arrives, though it is catchy. The antara is no better. Vocals are entertaining, especially Jonita’s, and the female backing vocalists. Divya gets the same part to sing twice, and he sounds good too, but it is the composition of his parts that sounds too flat. Arrangements consist of digital beats accompanied by Indian wedding instruments like the shehnaai (wonderful interlude on that!), dhols etc. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are very innovative at parts and very ordinary at parts. A confusing song! You don’t know whether you like it or not!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Kho Diya

Singer ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Now comes what I’ve been expecting from Sachin-Jigar ever since ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ released and I loved all the songs. After that, frankly, I didn’t love any Sachin-Jigar song as much as I loved the song ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’, in any of their albums that released. But now, in ‘Bhoomi’, they come up with a deserving opponent for ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ with this song, another ghazal, and in my opinion, even better than ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ itself. I’ll explain why. The composition is genuinely ghazal-like, as in an actual, authentic ghazal! Though that song was also a ghazal, it did have minor Bollywood-ish touches. But in this song, Sachin-Jigar do not bow down to peer pressure in order to make a Bollywood-friendly song. The song still does carry many nuances of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s style of composition though. I sincerely hope SLB catches this song and ropes Sachin-Jigar in for his next project! The antara is one of the most beautiful compositions I’ve heard in a while. The arrangements too, are amazing, with soothing tablas, divine manjeeras, beautiful Guitars, and scintillating strings that provide an atmosphere of love and divinity. The water drop sounds, so characteristic of SLB, sound beautiful. Sachin Sanghvi says this is his first solo song in Bollywood (He also sang a duet with Shreya Ghoshal in ‘Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story’ before this), and he does his solo debut in a smashing manner! His voice has that amazing metallic touch, which people might mistake for programming, but it is his raw voice! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are yet again, one of the most brilliant she’s written this year. A lovely number that is surely going to stay with me for a long time!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Daag

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The pathos enters now, as it always does. Of course, because this is an Omung Kumar film after all. There has to be an overtly dramatic sad song. And that happens to be this song. Now, the composition is really good, if I have to judge as per it’s genre. But as an individual song, this doesn’t take me anywhere. After the magic that the former song had me possessed with, this song falls flat! The duo try to lift it up with an intriguing and mysterious arrangement (this guitar riffs do the trick), but how much can a song be able to be saved by good arrangements if the composition isn’t appealing? Sukhwinder adds to the tedium, with his heavy voice, and it sounds very uncomfortable. Even though the composition is so poignant, it all sounds fake due to the overcooked nature of the music and vocals. The hookline itself too, is very tedious. It sounds like something that should have released around 2008. Sadly, this one isn’t memorable at all!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Jai Mata Di

Singers ~ Ajay Gogavale & Sanjay Dutt, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani

To wrap up the album, Sachin-Jigar present a devotional song. Now Ganeshotsav has ended, and Navratri is about to start, and with the film opening just one day after Navratri starts, it seems an apt decision to include a song entitled ‘Jai Mata Di’ in the album. Now, the song is primarily a very dramatic devotional song again, to make it fit with Omung Kumar standards of drama. However, it fares a bit better than that one, thanks to the divine touch. The composition is amazing, and Sachin-Jigar mould themselves into a very trademark Ajay-Atul mode to compose this one. Actually, if Ajay-Atul had composed for the ‘Sarkar’ series, and the chants would’ve been ‘Jai Mata Di’ instead of ‘Govinda’, then this would have been the perfect background score for the ‘Sarkar’ franchise. To add to the Ajay-Atul feel, Sachin-Jigar even rope in Ajay as the lead vocalist. As always, he aces the song. Sanjay Dutt starts the song with a mantra, bt his interventions throughout the actual song when he sings “Jai Maa Jai Maa’, sound better. The arrangements are good, and Especially the strings are amazing. Other sounds like the tabla, and the pathos-filled composition make it sound like yet another SLB song, a la ‘Gajanana’ (Bajirao Mastani), and ‘Dola Re Dola’ (Devdas). This song isn’t something to enjoy with your earphones, but something to experience in theatres!

Rating: 3.5/5


Bhoomi is a great example of an album composed by talented composers, but which suffers due to their inexperience in the genre of drama. Sachin-Jigar have composed for drama films very less; they usually go for rom-coms or musicals, but in this one, their discomfort is visible while composing for such a film. They still do try to add their own elements into the album, like the quirkiness of ‘Will You Marry Me’, which diffuses into thin air later on in the song. The best song in definitely ‘Kho Diya’, which I’m sure you will agree with, and so might they themselves. Anyway, it is one of those rare occasions where Sachin-Jigar disappoint, and it will surely pass!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 3 + 3.5 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kho Diya > Lag Ja Gale > Will You Marry Me = Jai Mata Di > Daag > Trippy Trippy

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhoomi? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

EK COMPOSER, DO COMPOSER, TEEN COMPOSER!! (LUCKNOW CENTRAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arjunna Harjaie, Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Adheesh Verma & Sukhwinder Singh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 18th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Lucknow Central Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Lucknow Central is a Bollywood drama film, starring Farhan Akhtar, Gippy Grewal, Inaamulhaq, Deepak Dobriyal , Diana Penty, Rajesh Sharma and Ronit Roy. The film has been directed by Ranjit Tiwari, and produced by Viacom18 Motion Pictures, Monisha Advani, Madhu C. Bhojwani and Nikkhil Advani. The plotline of this film closely resembles that of recently released ‘Qaidi Band’, and it is obviously a coincidence of the worst case. There is a difference though. The music here, is done by multiple composers. Leading the way is youngster Arjunna Harjaie, with three songs, and after he impressed so much in ‘Titoo MBA’, I cant wait to hear what he did here. Tanishk Bagchi has two songs too, and one is a remake, because he is the remake specialist according to T-Series. Guest composer Rochak Kohli presents one song in the album. All three of these composers have proved their mettle in the past, and it goes without saying that when it is an Advani production, the film is bound to have good if not great music. Also, I think Farhan Akhtar himself looks into the music of his films, and so it is bound to be great. Comparisons between this film and ‘Qaidi Band’ are sure to happen, but I noticed ‘Qaidi Band’ relied much more on the music, and this will rely much more on plot points. It reflects even in the number of songs — that film had nine, while this one has five and one version. So let’s see if this album supports the film!


1. Kaavaan Kaavaan

Singer ~ Divya Kumar, Chorus ~ Shivek, Anubhav, Aditya, Shubham, Umesh, Veljon, Vishal and Sarthak From Asm Academy, Original Composition by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

When Bollywood starts remaking songs from Hollywood movies (doesn’t matter that the song is Hindi, though) you would think things are finally messed up for real. However, it is a pleasant surprise when the remake actually turns out to be good, and quite innovative. Arjuna Harjai (now spelling his name as Arjunna Harjaie) returns after a year and a half, after the song from ‘Do Lafzon Ki Kahani’ last year, and gets the opportunity to recreate this quite popular Punjabi number ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ (Monsoon Wedding). The original had been composed jointly by Sukhwinder Singh and the film’s composer Mychael Danna. Now this remake is quite a good one. The composition has been kept intact for most of the song, with Arjunna having composed a new prelude to the song, with a haunting tune that immediately gets you interested. The original composition is good, and the “Kaavaan Kaavaan” portions, which I found irritating in the original, actually sound good here. The thing that makes this remake worthwhile though, is the amazing music. Arjunna equips a booming dhol rhythm (Vishal Dande), that has the required effect on the listener, making him or her groove to it happily. The shehnaai gives a wonderful traditional feel to the song. Strings and dafli have been used occasionally to infuse a strain of pathos through the song, and especially the antara (incorporated from the original itself) is beautiful, both in tune and its arrangements. The numerous tempo changes would normally be very confusing to a listener, but here, Arjunna manages them so seamlessly, it is unbelievable. As for the vocals, Divya Kumar steps into Sukhwinder Singh’s shoes without a problem, but because he does so, it evokes memories of Divya’s own ‘Jee Karda’ (Badlapur) in the first line of the song. 😄 And then a layman can easily say, “Hey! It’s a copy!” Because he wouldn’t know that ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ came before ‘Jee Karda’. But I commend the makers for firmly sticking with Divya’s voice anyway, since he has sung amazingly — the Punjabi-ness comes across beautifully through his voice, and he especially does the emotional portions very nicely. Kumaar’s additional lyrics are good too, adding on Sukhwinder’s original. An apt remake, with an amazing rhythm, and changes that do not disrupt the original song’s integrity.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Meer-E-Kaarwaan

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Neeti Mohan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli enters the soundtrack next, with his sole song, which happens to be a wonderful Sufi duet, with, again, a strain of pathos running through it. The composer doesn’t usually get to do such songs, but he did impress us with the amazingly soothing ‘Rozana’ (Naam Shabana) earlier this year, so it is no surprise that he ended up composing this one so well. The composition is so fresh, and quite like the Pritam school of alternative rock, it mixes Sufi sounds with a templated rock rhythm. Without the Sufi, the rock would’ve sounded incomplete, and vice versa. So it is like a beautiful combination that couldn’t be avoided. The antara is beautiful, and I must mention Neeti here, because she has sung her antara splendidly, and it is a delight to hear her in that whispery voice of hers. Her co-singer, Amit Mishra, builds on where Pritam left him off in ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), and here, he makes an effort to remain soft and not as energetic as he was there, and the result is excellent. The arrangements are rich as well, the dholaks providing the authentic Sufi touch, while the amazing guitar work (Keba Jeremiah) and strokes (Tapas Roy) are one of the highlights of the song. The choruses at the end and in the second interlude, have been composed beautifully. Also, there’s a pause after the second interlude, where one thinks the song ends, but it seems Rochak has more to give us! The lyrics by Adheesh Verma are great too! A song that wonderfully mixes elements of Pritam and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy styles of composition, and a beautiful Sufi-Rock arrangement!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Teen Kabootar

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Divya Kumar, Additional Vocals ~ Aflatunes, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Raftaar

Arjunna returns to the album with his second song, this time, a fun a cappella number full of onomatopoeia. The beginning itself gets your interest peaked and you listen closely right from the beginning, where the singers do an innovative sargam, that sounds excellent. The composition by Arjunna, yet again, resembles the style of a cappella that Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are well-known for, and they have succeeded with it in songs like ‘Maston Ka Jhund’ (Bhaag Milkha Bhaag). The composition doesn’t appeal to you at once though. It is the various vocal rhythms and sound effects that help you to find it appealing. The vocalists do an amazing job. Mohit’s metallic voice is the perfect choice for the song, and when he goes seamlessly from low to high notes, it sounds wonderful! Divya usually takes the high octaves and does so here as well. These lead singers definitely do well, but the backing vocalists also provide a very fun element to the song! The interlude where they sing “Chaaku Chaaku Leke Jaa..” is so fun to listen to! Even Raftaar’s rap adds an element of fun to the song. About the arrangements, whatever I say will be less. Amazing percussions (Taufiq Qureshi’s Mumbai Stamp) and guitar work makes the song appealing to listen to, and as mentioned before, Arjunna’s amazing use of the a cappella style in a desi way makes this song sound very unconventional. Kumaar’s situational lyrics too are clever and serve the purpose well. This song might be Arjunna’s ticket to many more Bollywood films which need quirky music!!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Rangdaari

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Arijit Singh has started to get songs in every film yet again; there was a kind of low phase intermittently. The only difference is that before, it used to appear right at the beginning of soundtracks. Now it has changed. And in this album too, we see an Arijit Singh song popping up as the fourth song on the soundtrack. The composition is amazingly beautiful. Arjunna Harjaie composes a wonderful Sufi tune, which is familiar to the ears, but soothing nonetheless. The hookline is something you’ve heard time and again, but still works its magic to soothe you down. Especially that line “tu laagey mujhe dushman si..” has been composed very beautifully. The antaras are beautiful, and the whole structure of the song reminds me of the recently released ‘Bairaagi’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) which sadly, didn’t work for me as well as this. Arjunna decorates his magical composition with stellar musical instruments. First of all, he gives the genuine Sufi touch with the dholaks (Aanchal Goud), which sound wonderful and very earthy. But it is the interlude, in which he introduces a wonderful flute piece (Shubham Shirule), accompanied by a MIND-BLOWING sargam by Arijit (or is it Arjunna?). And it is then that the song gives off beautiful Rahmanish vibes, but also gets its own place in your heart. The Duff rhythms do sound too heard-before, but they’re ignorable due to the wonderful things Arjunna has added besides that. The ethnic strings sound amazing here, and as always, Tapas Roy has done magic with them. The vocals by Arijit are top-notch, but it is his everyday composition and he aces it as was expected. The lyrics are very impressive here as well. A beautiful Sufi song, with a familiar sound, but still impressed me because of its innocence!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Renesa, Original Music by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

So ‘Kaavaan Kaavaan’, the opening track of the album, gets a ‘Remix’, or so T-Series calls it. But this isn’t the remix of Arjunna Harjaie’s song. It is the remix of the original song from ‘Monsoon Wedding’, done by Tanishk Bagchi, the third composer of the album. Also, I wouldn’t call it a remix at all, since it might just be another remake of the song by Tanishk, but Arjunna’s must have gotten chosen as the main version. This one is merely Tanishk’s original take on this song. That having been said, I can say Tanishk has worked very hard on this one. He tries to add digital beats wherever possible to make the song sound fresh, but some places it just doesn’t work, especially after the Indian arrangements that led the Arjunna version. Not that Tanishk hasn’t added dhols and all, but the emotion of the song doesn’t come across as well in this one. For a dance track though, this is better. Tanishk also ropes in Sukhwinder himself to re-dub the song, and that’s definitely a plus point. Renesa does the female portions of the song, and she sounds awesome. What bugged me was the hookline, where I found the backing vocalists too loud. A more zesty remake, but not more effective.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya, Vayu, Tanishk Bagchi & Arman Hasan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Tanishk’s second song serves as the caboose for this album, closing the album on a very lively and bright note. I say this because right from the beginning of the song, you know it is going to lift your spirits. It starts quite similarly to ‘Raula’ (Jab Harry Met Sejal), with lively plucked strings. The composition is fun to listen to, too, but gets slightly disjointed in the latter parts. It starts off brilliantly though, and the hookline is delightful. The arrangements here too, are mainly digital beats, but this time they succeed in remaking the song livelier. Tanishk’s trademark liveliness comes across well through this song, and it is a thing to wonder, why he spends time in doing some remakes. The singers do justice to the song, the lead singer, Brijesh doing an exceptionally good job. Little Arman Hasan, who we heard in ‘Kankad’ (Shubh Mangal Saavdhan), singing alongside his father Raja Hasan, does well too. Vayu has probably done some backing vocals, so I couldn’t really place him in the song! Kumaar’s lyrics, are amazing. He writes some amazingly positive lines in this one too, taking the support of various scientific inventors like Thomas Edison and Graham Bell. Lively song, but could’ve been slightly better!

Rating: 4/5


Lucknow Central is one of those rare multicomposer albums that is a delight to listen to. Well, I guess when each composer knows what he is best at, and delivers the best of whatever he is best at, with the proper supervision by the director and producer, the multicomposer album can also turn out well. Ek Composer, Do Composer, Teen Composer, But No Sign That This Album is Multicomposer!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 = 24.5

Album Percentage: 81.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rangdaari = Meer-E-Kaarwaan > Kaavaan Kaavaan = Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De = Teen Kabootar > Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 31 (from previous albums) + 02 {counting both different takes on ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’} = 33

 

Which is your favourite song from Lucknow Central? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: SIMPLE REHNE DE!! (SIMRAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Simran Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Baras Ja” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Baras Ja” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ To hear “Baras Ja” on YouTube:


Simran is an upcoming Bollywood drama film, directed by Hansal Mehta, produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Shailesh R. Singh, and Amit Agarwal. The film stars Kangana Ranaut, Soham Shah, Mark Justice, Hiten Kumar and Esha Tiwari Pande in crucial roles. The film revolves around a Gujarati lady settled in the United States of America, who gets involved in crime. The film does seem quirky and very racy, and definitely very humorous. Now, Hansal Mehta usually does not rely on music to carry his films forward, as is evident from the fact that out of his recent film, ‘Shahid’ had just one song (not even released properly by a music label), and ‘Aligarh’ had no songs. Then there was ‘Citylights’, which, due to it being a joint venture with the Bhatts, had a stellar album by Jeet Gannguli. This film seems to be Hansal’s lightest film in a long time, and the result is that we can read the names of Sachin-Jigar in the credits, for music. Now, roping in Sachin-Jigar can’t mean anything except that Hansal wants great music for this film, doesn’t it? Accordingly, Sachin-Jigar have scored six songs for the film, and very situational too. Still, before I reveal much, let’s see how the music fares!!


1. Lagdi Hai Thaai

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Doodho nahaao, phoolo phalo tum,
LED jaisi karna glow tum,
Sabko duayein yeh naseeb rakhna,
Jodi sada ye muskuraaye!
Maike ki photo ik kareeb rakhna,
Aisa na ho ki bhooli jaaye, jaaye, jaaye!
Jadon nache baby sajj dhajj, Lagdi hai thaai!”

– Vayu

It must be so difficult to compose for seven film albums in a year, but Sachin-Jigar are up and about, composing for the fourth album, which happens to be ‘Simran’. The first song matches Sachin-Jigar’s roots, as it is a Gujarati track by soul, but Punjabi by sound. Actually, it’s a beautifully thought out fusion of Gujarati and Punjabi, something nobody would ever be able to do this well and this seamlessly! The composition is perfectly suitable for a song that should make you get up and dance, and the desi touch, both Punjabi and Gujarati, add to the enjoyability of the song. Both the mukhda and the antara have been composed on the same tune, and Sachin-Jigar follow the trend to keep the song short and more appealing. The short length never hampers the beauty of the song. The hookline is amazing as well, but it is the arrangements that makes the song sound amazing. When it starts, you may be quick enough to dismiss it as yet another typical Punjabi number, added into the album just to be another ‘London Thumakda’ (Queen), but later you realise the magic, when the Gujarati dhols begin to awe you. The brass band (Trumpets by Kishore Sodha) is used very nicely here, and without sounding stale or heard-before, it provides a nice and fresh touch. But what is really amazing, is that wonderful flute (Naveen Kumar) which has been played in a very typical Gujju style, and it does nothing but inspire you to learn how to play flute! 😛 But I’m sure this kind of a flautist would take years to become so good! The vocals are amazing. At first, I thought Guru Randhawa has been chosen just because he has a history of many pop songs with T-Series, but turns out, he has given the Punjabi touch to the song very genuinely, and keeps aside all his pop song background for this one filmy song! Jonita is a surprise package; singing in Gujarati and all — though I think she is Gujarati. Anyway, she sings the old lady portions with as much ease as she does the lead heroine’s portions! In fact, she sings the Dadi Maa portions in Gujarati even better!! One thing I didn’t enjoy was the drunk part at the end, it seemed forced. Vayu’s lyrics are some of the most positive wedding song lyrics I’ve seen in Bollywood, a place where people come to weddings only to eat, drink and dance. But here, Vayu makes the characters sing things like “LED Jaisi Karna Glow Tum!” I swear, it is one of the most positive blessings I’ve heard in a Bollywood wedding song, and so less dramatic than the blessings they used to sing in songs like ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kal Ho Naa Ho) and all! All in all, this is a very enjoyable Gujju-Punjabi fusion, with amazing arrangements to accompany the energetic vocals!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Pinjra Tod Ke

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jannat ke saaye, jannat le aaye hai,
Baahon mein, ab zindagi,
Kismat ki dori jo, baandhi woh kholi,
Jeene chali, main abb zindagi,
Pinjra tod ke, tod ke, udd jaana hai,
Baahein kholke, kholke, udd jaana hai!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song starts off as a mellow composition, with piano notes almost assuring you that this is going to be a sad number. However, it is wonderful to see how Sachin-Jigar seamlessly change the mood of the song, making it uplifting and motivational as the song progresses. That is almost like a symbol infused into the song by Sachin-Jigar. The lyrics by Priya Saraiya talk about breaking free of restrictions, and flying freely — so Sachin-Jigar have probably structured the song in a way to resemble that, starting off very slowly, but breaking free subsequently! What a wonderful form the song takes on, once you realise that! Sachin-Jigar’s composition is nothing new, it is the usual Sunidhi pathos, but it works wonders even though it is heard-before. After all, it isn’t necessary for things to be complicated to like them, is it? The hookline is very motivating, as is the second antara, a sprightly conclusion to the otherwise soft song. It takes on a more energetic tempo and composition, and even has more energetic arrangements, since the electric guitars and drums truly break out in that part. The rest of the arrangements have a soothingly Western touch — starting off with amazing piano, progressing into a euphoric acoustic guitar-led arrangement, until the aforementioned second antara arrives. The interludes contain a wonderful “Oley Oley“, by a backing vocalist I suspect is Jonita Gandhi, she sounds exactly like her. This type of song nowadays, usually goes to Sunidhi, and she aces it, as always. It’s nice to see her finally getting recognised not only as a singer of those upbeat numbers she was terribly typecast for in the late 2000s. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics, as mentioned before, are motivating and uplifting, in the true sense! This is probably Priya’s best work in a long time! A beautiful song, with a simple and heard-before vibe, but still manages to impress monumentally!!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Meet

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Tu hi mera meet hai ji,
Tu hi meri preet hai ji,
Jo labon se ho sake naa judaa,
Aisa mera geet hai ji!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song happens to be a very happy-go-lucky romantic song, sung by Arijit, the kind of song Sachin-Jigar have usually done many times with Atif. Since their songs with Arijit have always been unconventional and never-heard-before, this comes as a surprise, as it conforms to the regular Arijit school of romance. However, the composition is really charming, and has you hooked (at least to the hookline) in the first listen. In the subsequent listens you “try” to get hooked to the mukhda and antara. Sadly, I still can’t recall the tunes of these portions immediately, even after having listened to the song at least six times by now. Does that mean the song is bad? Not at all. The song is amazing. Sachin-Jigar weave magic even with those notes that evoke memories of compositions by other composers, but doesn’t really evoke memories of any song in particular. It has the charm of an old Bollywood song, and it is the kind of composition to which we would say “Ah, the nostalgia”, after listening to it after a long time somewhere in the future. It is for this reason that the song gets such a huge repeat value even though it isn’t hooking as such. The hook has wonderful variations Arijit takes not every time, so they remain exclusive, but you keep waiting for the times he does take those variations! The arrangements are just as soothing as the composition; again, a wonderful piano piece opens the song, coupled with a magical and fairy-tale-like strings portion, until the Acoustic guitars come in to lighten up the mood. The whole thing sounds so fulfilling with that wonderful composition. The guitar riff repeats throughout the song. The interlude has a nice flute portion, which keeps you listening, if not hooked. Arijit aces such songs, and does so yet again. Again, I must mention those wonderful aalaaps of his, in the hookline. Priya writes amazing lyrics here too, but here they’re quite simple, even more simple than ‘Pinjra Tod Ke’, and has a plain and straightforward theme — love. A charming love song, with simplicity ruling it.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Single Rehne De

Singers ~ Shalmali Kholgade & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Mere dad bole karle shaadi, varna marr jaayegi boodhi daadi,
Shaadi kar, shaadi kar, shaadi kar, aakkho din shaadi kar,
Aur koi kaam nahi hai kya??”

– Vayu

A laugh riot arrives next, with a song that’s evidently about the main character trying to convince her father to let her stay single. There is actually very less by way of composition in the song, whatever little there is, just keeps repeating. The song is more like a rap, but it is the lyrics that hold it higher than it would have been. Vayu cracks you up with humorous lines that usually don’t find their way into songs; they are typical to scripts of rom-coms, but I find it very cool for them to find their way into a song. The production too, is good, but very repetitive again. Nevertheless, it goes with the unconventional nature of the lyrics. Shalmali Kholgade renders the rap with a feisty attitude, and Divya Kumar, relegated to the background does his one line well. Shalmali says the conversational portions of the song, at the beginning in such a funny, humorous way, that you start to get interested in the song due to her! Not a very fresh composition, but fresh lyrics and vocals, and even arrangements, which are sadly repeated too much!

Rating: 4/5

 

5. Simran

Singer ~ Jigar Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Chulbuli hai, chulbuli hai, nakchadhi hai, manchali hai,
Palak jhapakte falak churaa le apni Simran!
Jaani anjaani, thodi si deewaani,
Deewaana sabko banaa de apni Simran!
Ho, suljha ke hi khud hi yeh badhaye apne dil aur dimaag ki uljhan!
Oye oye oye Simran, alhad si Simran!
Na jaane tu chali re kahaan!”

– Priya Saraiya

The title song which we heard in the trailer is presented to us next, and it is this song which is actually the one that took the most time for me to like. The composition is very likeable, and has a lilting charm to it, in a very playful way, and has a charming ‘Barfi’-esque vibe to it, with the numerous sound effects and the whole description of the main character. The composition is great, if you look at it, but the arrangements confused me. Firstly, I was apprehensive about them because they were so similar to the ‘Barfi’ title track, with the whole accordion, mandolin and vocal sound effects, that I wasn’t sure if I liked them! I love ‘Barfi’, but I just felt weird about this song being so close to that. Later on, I started appreciating the arrangements, because of their lilting European touch and it was definite that Sachin-Jigar’s music would be inspired by Pritam’s as they were his disciples after all! Jigar has sung the song himself, and he has carried it out very well, and his raw, Un-autotuned vocals make the song even better as it sounds more natural and casual! The lyrics by Priya too, do a great job in acquainting us with the character of Simran, and her nature. A good title song, with an amazing arrangement.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

♪ Bonus Song

♪ Baras Ja

Singer ~ Mohit Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jo nainon mein hai boondein,
Inhe rukhsaar ko, jee bhar ke chhoone de zara…
Ae dil, baras jaa, baras jaa na!
Abb toh aakar bhigo de tu mujhe!”

– Priya Saraiya

Now this song released later, a few days after T-Series had released the “Full Album”. Coincidentally, it had flooded in Mumbai on that day, and they came with a song called ‘Baras Ja’ the same night, so maybe they were waiting. 😶 Anyway, the song is probably the best, and least simple song on the soundtrack. It has a very complicated tune, but in spite of that, it is so easily loveable! It starts with a very sublime sound of the matka, and again, a soothing flute portion (Sachin-Jigar have really gotten it right with the flute in this album!!) that ensures you that this song was worth the wait! The composition is beautiful, very 90s, and very earthy at the same time, being very soothing. The antara is very, very amazingly composed, and Sachin-Jigar mix elements of Pritam’s and Rahman’s style of composition, to present to us a song, that is rooted to Indian music, especially in the arrangements. The song is decorated with beautiful flute pieces, and the Indian percussion really helps give it that earthy feel. Wonderful piano notes provide the much needed Western touch to the song too, but the Indian-ness overpowers it. Mohit Chauhan reminds us of his ‘Tum Se Hi’ (Jab We Met) days, and croons the song just as mellifluously. He does get a beautiful song all to himself after a long time, after having two songs by Pritam in ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’, sharing space with a co-singer in both of them. This is his first solo song after a long time! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics again, are very effective in bringing out the romance, and help give the song another thing to boast about. If it had been released earlier, it would’ve been easier for people to find, with all the other songs of the album, and got more audience! I am sad because this is definitely the best of the album!!

Rating: 5/5


Simran is yet another beautiful album from Sachin-Jigar. After three albums this year, out of which one was a multicomposer one, they strike gold yet again with their fourth one. I definitely think we can attribute the beauty of this album to one and only one reason — that it’s a solo composer album, and the director Hansal Mehta was clear in what he wanted. The freedom and creative liberty given to Sachin-Jigar is evident, because they’ve made some of the most beautiful melodies, without making things too complicated. That shows us how things can be made more attractive by following a simple formula — “Simple Rehne De!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Baras Ja = Pinjra Tod Ke > Meet = Simran = Lagdi Hai Thaai > Single Rehne De

 

Which is your favourite song from Simran? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

TANISHK-VAYU KI SHAANDAAR DAAVAT!! (SHUBH MANGAL SAAVDHAN – Music Review)

How clever, how innovative and how unconventional! In keeping with the unconventional theme of this movie, the music company Eros Music (who before this, have never disappointed me in releasing music on time!) have thought of a very innovative music release strategy i.e, to not release the album as a “full album” even after the movie has released! Wow!! How nice! One of the composers of the album, Vayu Srivastava, (@purevayu on Twitter) though was kind enough to assure me that this was the last song; so going ahead with the review!

UPDATE (5th September 2017): Eros Now has now released the full OST, and it does indeed, only have five songs.


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 5th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st September 2017

Shubh Mangal Saavdhan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on ErosNow CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan is a Bollywood film, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar in the lead roles, directed by debutant R.S. Prasanna and produced by Aanand L. Rai and Krishika Lulla. The film revolves around the film’s leading man, who suffers from ‘erectile dysfunction’, what he calls a ‘Gent’s Problem’. The madness and mayhem that follows in the already engaged to be married couple’s life is the premise of the story. (Because the adults have found out as well!) So the theme is quirky and the film has been getting RAVE reviews, but there was no sign of the music album, even after the film had released! Eros Music seems to be following a certain promotional strategy, and I must say, it’s the worst promotional strategy ever, where the promotion carries on even after film release! At least Sony Music releases the album 11-12 hours before the film, leaving the music lovers satisfied! This irresponsible type of music release where the music released after the movie, is just plain weird. Anyway, the music album happens to be fast-coming-to-the-top composer duo Tanishk-Vayu’s first solo album, in which they’ve composed all songs, and even written all the songs! And whatever I’ve heard of Tanishk-Vayu’s music, it is always quirky and zany, and a brilliant mix of Indian and Western sounds, so I’m sure that they would provide amazing music for this film, about the wedding of two people from small middle-class families in Delhi! Let’s dive in and see how sumptuous their wedding feast turns out to be!


1. Rocket Saiyyan

Singers ~ Ritu Pathak, Brijesh Shandilya & Tanishk Bagchi

“Duniya palat doonga, tu na lena tension,
Tere hi liye hai meri sagli attention,
Dekho na baby dil ki wire ke length ko,
Chhukar dekho pyaar waale current ko!
Baatein kare phenke gulaab, hamare saiyyan,
Aisi velocity janaab, phawware saiyyan,
Rocket hamare saiyyan!!”

Tanishk-Vayu start their first solo album, with a quirky romantic song, with the peppiness quotient very high. The song is a quirky take on the quintessential Indian Wedding songs, and the duo’s small experiments all throughout the song make it so appealing. The composition, for one, is so crazy and zany, it appeals instantly, to people who are open to loving weird stuff, and I’m one of them! Right from the beginning, the duo uses quirky sounds to catch the attention of the listener, and it works in a weird way. The actual composition is very simple, and in some places I could tell they’re just trying to be overtly crazy and weird, but it just works so well, you don’t have time to think about it. The song has a mukhda and an antara, the mukhda by the female singer, while the antara is by the male. Both have the same, crazy kind of tune, and the hookline is very catchy, as it should be. However, it might just be reduced to a “Comedy” song. There is a certain quality in the arrangements as well — the quirk creeps into the music too, and alongside the usual wedding percussion, we get funny sounds like babies crying, and other computerised noises, that just act as nice attractions throughout the short song. The use of the shehnaai (Seems digital) in the interlude produces quite a humorous effect. The vocals are good for the type of song it is — Ritu Pathak, returning to sing after a long, long time, manages it very well, and a bit off tune too, producing a good, imperfect effect that suits the song very well. Brijesh Shandilya, the composers’ favourite, also does an amazing job, but has a very little portion. The lyrics by the duo too, are funny and cute. A song that might irritate a lot of people, but the quirk is what you have to look out for!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kanha / Kanha (Unplugged)

Singers ~ Shashaa Tirupati / Ayushmann Khurrana

“Roke mohe, toke mohe, kaate re dagar o re Yamuna ke tatt ki,
Laaj nahi, kaaj nahi, maare jo kankariya, toh phoote mori matki,
Vaak chatur bharmaave, prem jaar arjhaave,
Jo bhi kare, kare sab quick, quick, quick, quick!
Kahun main piya ji thoda karlo sabar par na, maane na,
Kanha, maane na!”

This next song happens to be Tanishk-Vayu’s most straightforward song of their career, conforming the most to conventional standards than any of their other songs that have all been quirky! Of course, that was called for here, since they had to compose a thumri, and you can’t really mess with thumris. They have a particular fixed structure, and a way of making them. That being said, the duo does a wonderful job in making their first semi-classical song, and they win half the battle with the strong composition itself! The composition is so free-flowing, like so many of the Radha-Krishna songs of Bollywood. I can just predict that this will make its place in the list of Great Bollywood Krishna songs. The hookline is just so sweet, and instantly likeable, and the composition of the entire thumri has a very tangible Rahman touch to it; it is impossible to dislike that. It freshens your mind up instantly, as good Indian classical music always does. The song is presented to us in two versions — one by a professional, and a female version, as conventional thumris usually are. That version is sung by the awesome Shashaa Tirupati, who uses her sweet voice to melt your heart singing the thumri. She’s getting really good classical based numbers in the Rahman camp as well this year, and now she gets to sing this one, which almost sounds as if it’s a spawn of the Rahman songs. The duo give the female version a beautiful, traditional arrangement, with amazing tablas, sarod, and awe-inspiring flute solos. It is a delight to the ears, and the richness of the music just can’t be forgotten for a long time. It starts so richly too, with the background vocalists singing a nice vocal rhythm, alongside the playful combo of the santoor and flute! But even with all the conventional-ness of the arrangements, the duo tries something unconventional, and adds drumbeats every time before the hookline, and that’s what makes the song even more interesting! The second version is by the leading man of the film, Ayushmann Khurrana, who seems to be singing at least one song in every film of his nowadays. Of course, since he can sing so well, he aces the song, but I never knew he could sing classical this well. Of course, it doesn’t sound professional, but it is good enough! The duo decorate this one with a beautiful guitar riff (Tapas Roy) and a nice loop on the ukulele that’s so captivating! So while one version is completely semiclassical, the other one follows a more “Unplugged” (as it is named) route, with the guitar playing the lead role. Last but definitely not the least, the lyrics of both versions are beautiful. I commend the duo for using traditional words like “sakhi“, “laaj“, “panghat“, “badra“, and making it sound more rooted. And on the other hand, the duo uses English words, creating a fun contrast. The Radha-Krishna story has been kept intact, and the romance of the protagonists uses that as a backdrop, and it is so beautiful to listen to! Kudos to Tanishk-Vayu for a wholesome semiclassical number, in two delightful versions!!

Rating: 5/5 for Shashaa’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version

 

3. Laddoo

Singer ~ Mika Singh

“Boli aisi ke, tamatar bhi mangayein toh lage jaise mushaayaron mein
Baitha sunn raha hoon usko!
Aankhein aisi ke, milaayein jab nigaahein, ye nigaahein dagmagayein,
Kuch samajh mein bhi na aaye dil ko!
Ho, jab se mohabbat uthi, seene mein ghus gayi Gupti,
Iss dil ke laddoo bant gaye!”

The duo bring back the quirkiness and unconventional quality of the album with this song, a romantic song sung by Mika! Now, before we start complaining about how Mika isn’t suitable for romantic songs, I would like to remind you about “440 Volt” (Sultan) last year, which was a romantic song that wouldn’t have sounded half as good if Mika hadn’t sung it. This time, Tanishk-Vayu compose a very quirky number and rope Mika in to sing it. The composition is again, a very desi composition, that will appeal to your sense if you love traditional tunes with an innate quirk. The mukhda is amazing, the antaras make sure you don’t make your attention wander elsewhere, but the hookline is the best part — it is so short and simple, as if they’re stating an obvious fact, “Iss Dil Ke Laddoo Bant Gaye!” and it’s over as soon as it starts. That’s the best part of this hookline; it doesn’t hover around for long and waste your time. The arrangements are very beautiful — a very traditional beat of manjeeras and dholaks among rich guitar riffs sounds very interesting, and never before heard. The shehnaai-like sounds are also very fun to listen to. The manjeeras give the song a very unconventional and traditional rhythm, and that is what made me listen very closely to the arrangements in the first place! Towards the end we get a fun shehnaai portion, and it seems to be a sweet conclusion to the fun-filled romantic song. The vocals by Mika are surprisingly amazing; the duo seem to have done a good job in giving him the right brief, and so he doesn’t eat up many of his words here! The way he sings the hook is a way nobody else could’ve done it! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and the comedy element is intact even in this song. The quirkiest romantic song I’ve heard in a while!!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Kankad

Singers ~ Raja Hasan, Shashaa Tirupati, Rajnigandha Shekhawat & Arman Hasan

“Mere liye tu Ram na Ranjha, utna bahut hai, jitna sanjha,
Chhote bade sab tere, sapne hain mere abb,
Mere wale sapne toh, sach mein hain mere abb,
Tu jo rahega toh, saath dega toh, Rab se kya mangungi main,
Sab kuch toh paa lungi main,
Dil yeh kahin ladkhadaye agar toh thaam le na please!
Kankad bhi kabhi koi aa nahi sakta tere mere beech!!”

The duo wind up the album with a wedding song, but again, it is a very traditional wedding song, and full of emotion! The composition is very heavy on emotion as well; and it focuses on the emotion much more than it does on the enjoyment factor! At the end it basically just freshens your mind and makes you feel good. The makers had kept this song hidden until even after the movie was released, but I don’t understand why, because it was such a beautiful number!! The composition showcases Tanishk-Vayu’s versatility, and they prove that they can compose emotional numbers just as well as those upbeat comic numbers. The hookline especially is steeped with emotion — you can just feel the emotion through the earphones as it plays. The arrangements too, represent some of the duo’s most rich arrangements in terms of folk instruments and traditional sounds. The quintessential wedding chorus starts the song off, with a tumbi sound, and your interest is peaked right there. The dholaks, dafli, strings and a surprise element of the shehnaai in the interlude all provide an amazingly rich arrangement, at the same time keeping things very enjoyable and danceable on! The whole composition and arrangements have a very distinct Rahmanish touch to them! The vocals are beautiful, with Raja Hasan (after a long time, yo!) taking care of the male portions well, keeping the emotion intact. However, he could have been better in certain places.  The female singer, Shashaa Tirupati, has a very small part, but still manages to steal the lightning, as that part has been composed so thoughtfully by the composers, and it is full of tangible emotion. The various backing vocalists like the small child singing at the end, provide a nice “grand Indian wedding” feel to the song. But still, the lyrics which are so full of emotion, do not make you feel as if it is a conventional Bollywood wedding song; it is just too sweet for that! The lyrics are what make you realise the true meaning of the song, and I salute the makers for making this emotional song against the backdrop of the wedding. Last month we saw an emotional song against the backdrop of the Holi festival, ‘Gori Tu Latth Maar’ (Toilet: Ek Prem Katha), and this time, Tanishk-Vayu follow the same template, to make another beautiful wedding song full of love and emotion! A commendable job, to create an emotional wedding song! Not your everyday Bollywood Wedding song!! This ends the album on a very high note!!

Rating: 5/5


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan really proved how talented Tanishk-Vayu are. Usually, they appear in multicomposer albums where they hardly get enough scope to show their talent in composing for an entire movie, with a particular theme running throughout the movie. Here, when they get the chance finally, they make great use of the opportunity and provide us with an enjoyable album full of quirky music, and also some emotional music. Their method of fusing quirky sounds with traditional desi beats and tunes, really is the hallmark of their music, and it is what makes their music light, fluffy and a delectable treat to listen to! Thank you, Tanishk and Vayu, for treating us to such a delicious wedding feast of an album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 92%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kanha = Kankad > Laddoo = Kanha (Unplugged) > Rocket Saiyyan

 

Which is your favourite song from Shubh Mangal Saavdhan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂