5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂