A MUFFLED SOUND EXPLOSION!! (PARMANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Srivastava, Dr. Kumar Vishwas, Sachin Sanghvi & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Parmanu Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Parmanu is a Bollywood drama/thriller film starring John Abraham, Boman Irani and Diana Penty, directed by Abhishek Sharma and produced by Zee Studios, JA Entertainment and Kyta Productions. The film revolves around the 1998 bomb test explosions conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan under the leadership of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam during PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s tenure. The film has opened to mixed reviews, but what had me most excited about the film (since the subject matter isn’t really the kind I like) was the music by Sachin-Jigar. Well, Sachin-Jigar and Jeet Gannguli, as I learned after the album released.


Sachin-Jigar April start the album off with a refreshing song Shubh Din, which follows the folksy Gujarati/Rajasthani template to the tee, but still manages to turn out as an entertaining number. They recreate their own ‘Aavi Re Hoon Aavi Re’ (from the Gujarati movie Carry On Kesar), and the song has a catchy instrumental loop after the hookline, which Sachin-Jigar have made sure, hooks the audience. The arrangements give the impression that the makers were going for something grander, but had to settle for less than what they intended. The folksiness doesn’t come out full-fledgedly as one would expect from Sachin-Jigar, but ends up sounding muffled. The vocals by Keerthi Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri are amazing though, as is Sachin-Jigar’s composition, so at least the song is entertaining for as long as it plays.
The next folksy number by Sachin-Jigar, Thare Vaaste, is like a patriotic recreation of their song ‘Chunar’ (ABCD 2), especially lyrically. Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics are aptly poignant and patriotic, but sadly, the composers’ tune doesn’t match up to that level; it fails to move the listener. The anthemic tune gets repetitive after some time, and though Divya Kumar does well in trying to make the song sound energetic, it is again the fault of the muffled-sounding arrangements, that the song doesn’t come to life as would be expected.
Kasumbi, the best song of the album, also sees the duo follow the folksy template, but this time Vayu’s lyrics are Punjabi, in a film set in Rajasthan. This one starts off like another ‘Chunar’ spawn, but soon sets in as a moving patriotic number — the shehnaai is the most remarkable instrument used here; it harks back to the old patriotic songs. Again, the arrangements sound muffled here too (what’s with the poor programming throughout the album?) but Sachin-Jigar’s tune is so strong, it can be overlooked. Also, Divya Kumar gives an amazing performance, especially in that gem of a hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are beautiful, incorporating the word ‘Kasumbi’, which is probably the name for the saffron colour associated with patriotism in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
The last two songs composed by Sachin-Jigar in this album, have soothing tunes and less of a folksy impact than the previous songs. Sapna is the trademark Sachin-Jigar romantic melody (a la ‘Meet’ from ‘Simran’) in its composition, but the lyrics by Sachin Sanghvi are not romantic at all. Overall it is a pleasant listen, which Sachin-Jigar doing their signature method of repeating an instrumental loop after the hookline. (The loop in this song sounds a lot like the one in ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ from “Meri Pyaari Bindu”). Arijit Singh is himself in the song, and carries it off like he carries off every song he’s ever carried off. The guitars are enjoyable and soothing, and the sarangi is beautiful, and the song itself is fortunately short — any longer and it would’ve been too long.
The last song by Sachin-Jigar, De De Jagah, is yet another in the same vein as ‘Sapna’, but this time, the lyricist (poet and politician Dr. Kumar Vishwas) complements it with romantic lyrics. What strikes me right away, yet again, is that something is wrong with the mixing, making Yasser Desai’s voice sound like it has been recorded on WhatsApp. Sachin-Jigar’s vibrant composition is one of the best of theirs over the period of 2016-2018, and Yasser Desai, barring the bad use of his vocals, tries to do his best, and succeeds fairly enough. The guitars and tablas complement each other surprisingly well, and the harmonium provides the soul in the song. The tune of the hookline is what will get you hooked to this song, just like songs traditionally are supposed to do.
Now, the reason I described that as Sachin-Jigar’s last song, is because there’s a kind of guest composer we have in the album; he has been waiting patiently for his turn, and I’m more than happy to talk about his song. The man in question in Jeet Gannguli, who has somehow bagged a romantic (read Mohit Suri-like sob-inducing) song in a movie like this. Jitni Dafa is one of those songs we have heard enough of in Bollywood, and I can’t believe the makers would proactively damage their own music album by including such a song in the album. It starts off painfully simple, and until those ‘Aashiqui 2’-ish beats start, it isn’t that painful, but when they do start, you keep waiting for the song to end. Rashmi-Virag write great lyrics, but hey, I’m quite sure John’s character in the film has time to weep like this at such a critical time and dire situation. And the singer is Yasser Desai, trying his best to be a mix of Mustafa Zahid, Arijit Singh, Saim Bhatt and Atif Aslam.


Parmanu has a soundtrack that mostly sticks to the point (barring that guest song) but something is definitely wrong with the arrangements; if they had been better mixed and mastered, the sound would’ve been grander and more enjoyable!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 39

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kasumbi > Shubh Din > De De Jagah > Thare Vaaste = Sapna > Jitni Dafa

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 19 (from previous albums) + 01 = 20

Which is your favourite song from Parmanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DECEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP (FUKREY RETURNS, FIRANGI, TERA INTEZAAR & MONSOON SHOOTOUT – Mini Music Reviews)

It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.


♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.


Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44


♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!


A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya



♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.


This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil



♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.


An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay



Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

MULTICOMPOSERS KI KHATTI-MEETHI BARFI!! (BAREILLY KI BARFI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Samira Koppikar & Sameer Uddin
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Pravesh Mallick, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Puneet Sharma & Akshay Verma
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 11th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th August 2017

Bareilly Ki Barfi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bareilly Ki Barfi is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, starring Kriti Sanon, Ayushmann Khurrana, and Rajkummar Rao in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Nil Battey Sannata’ fame Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari, and produced by Nitesh Tiwari and Shreyas Jain. The movie revolves around the Mishra family, who are in search for a suitable groom for their daughter, played by Sanon. The complexities and pressure of getting married is too much for Bitti, Sanon’s character, and she decides to run away. On the run, she finds a book, ‘Bareilly Ki Barfi’ at the train station, and picks it up, only to realise that the female protagonist thinks a lot like her! Thus she embarks on a quest to look for this someone who thinks so much like her. The story seems very content-driven, but that’s not to stop it from having some good music; in fact, most content-driven films have better music than others! Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari’s first film, ‘Nil Battey Sannata’, had an awesome album completely composed by a newcomer duo, Rohan-Vinayak. This time, the makers go for the multicomposer route. Tanishk Bagchi, Tanishk-Vayu, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar and Sameer Uddin are composing the music for this film. As I am expecting an overall good album, and since every name is a known name (even Sameer Uddin, who is the one who had done those remixes in ‘Bluffmaster’ long ago) I don’t think I need to say what I expect from each of them individually! So let’s help ourselves to this ‘Barfi’!


1. Sweety Tera Drama

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Pawni Pandey & Shraddha Pandit, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Pravesh Mallick

An aptly U.P. flavoured start to the album, the first song is a fun and upbeat dance number, along the lines of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’s title song. Coincidentally, the man behind it is Tanishk, the composer of that song. The composition is very fun and enjoyable, and the composer has kept it relevantly short; such songs are least enjoyable if they ramble on for four minutes and longer. The shortness gives it a crisp feel, and leaves you wanting more. There is one mukhda and one antara, both composed entertainingly. The arrangements too resemble those of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ title song, with the dholaks (Naveen Sharma), harmoniums and bulbultarang (Pradip Pandit) and quirky digital beats. The star music is amazing, especially that sarangi bit by Sangeet, that is so easy to miss! Tanishk adds very fun sound effects like that rap by Pravesh Mallick, then a random but funny “Myujik” that just plays anytime. His digital instrumentation is fun as well. The song has been sung by three singers and the rapper. The rapper, as stated before, brings out the U.P. flavour very well, and begins on a promising note. Dev Negi is his usual fun self, while Pawni and Shraddha, the two female vocalists, with two lines each, make a difference even with the little scope! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are fun too! A fun dance number that strives to be simple but sweet!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Nazm Nazm / Nazm Nazm (feat. Ayushmann Khurrana) / Nazm Nazm (feat. Sumedha Karmahe)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee / Ayushmann Khurrana / Sumedha Karmahe, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Arko steps forth to present his song, and as is the requisite whenever Arko composes for a multicomposer album nowadays, he gets to do the romantic song of the album. Well, since he is so good at making these, it seems logical. This song here, is yet another example of his romantic song composing skills. The composition is charming, but there is one small drawback, and that is that it takes a long time to grow. It consists of many twists and turns, and isn’t instantly hooking like most of his other songs. The second antara is particularly beautiful. The hookline manages to get the audience charmed. The lyrics though, are beautiful, and are another instance of how beautiful Arko himself writes!! The song appears in three versions, though, and one does feel that it is one too many. Arko doesn’t sing this song as well as he sang ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), ‘Dariya’ (Baar Baar Dekho) or ‘Saathi Rey’ (Kapoor & Sons), and thus, his version comes across as slightly boring. The arrangements in this version also resemble ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom) with those extra sugary Duff rhythms and synthesizer tune (Keys by Aditya Dev). It reduces the likability a bit. Ayushmann increases the ear-friendliness of the song with his trademark charming voice, and renders it with ease. His style of rounding the vowels makes the song sound so much like he has composed it himself. The variations he takes on many notes, which Arko had not, makes the song sound more layered. The arrangements too, get more Ayushmann-ish, with acoustic guitars (Krishna Pradhan), but the Arko-ness is retained with the amazing piano notes. Thankfully, the Duff rhythms are done away with. The last version happens to be a female version; a version I personally feel was least required. So Zee Music releases videos of singers singing covers of hit songs, and I almost know that this version will be used as that. Not to take it away from Sumedha though; she sings beautifully! Arko arranges this one with a soothing flute, but nothing else really stands out! A romantic song that features so many times, we have no choice but to love it!

Rating: 4/5 for Arko’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version, 3.5/5 for Sumedha’s Version

 

3. Twist Kamariya

Singers ~ Harshdeep Kaur, Yasser Desai, Tanishk Bagchi & Altamash, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

The next song has Tanishk coming back together with his partner with which he debuted, Vayu. They keep coming back together occasionally, and it is quite fun. Though their last song ‘Beat It Bijuriya’ could’ve been better, this one is a real treat. The composition is very simple, and if it were not for the amazingly quirky beats and arrangements, the song would not have sounded half as good. Of course, a very templated dhol rhythm accompanies the song, but a very quirky digital sound also comes along with that and everything sounds so innovative. The interlude is amazing, with the dhols and shehnaai. Rock guitars are really electrifying in the antara. The hookline, the way it is sung, is so cool. The pause between ‘Twist’ and ‘Kamariya’ really makes the difference. Im probably hearing Harshdeep Kaur in this zany avatar for the first time. I mean, she has sung upbeat numbers, but not so crazily funny! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are a clever mix of Bhojpuri and Hindi and English. A song that calls for loud whistles and cheers in the theatre! U.P. folk meets techno music!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Bairaagi / Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar,  Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

Samira Koppikar, who really pleasantly surprised me with her song in ‘Dobaara’ earlier this year, jumps onto the album next, with a melancholic song that is sung by –obviously — Arijit! The song is good, I can’t take that away from it. But somewhere the composition evokes so many memories of previous Arijit songs that were composed on the same rock lounge-ish template. It actually sounds like a Pritam song when that beautiful backing chorus comes in, and that’s probably the best effect of the song. The composition too, is beautiful, and hits the heart straight. I just don’t think I would listen to it a lot. The vocals are, obviously spot-on. What can be expected when it is Arijit? Fortunately, there’s another version, possibly for the music lovers. Samira sings this one, and it starts with a heavenly chorus by her. She sings in beautifully, and is first of all supported by a wonderfully soothing folksy string instrument, evoking memories of ‘Sahiba’ (Phillauri). Later that Punjabi feel is increased, when a nice dholak-led rhythm sets in. This version is definitely better than Arijit’s. The lyrics by Puneet Sharma are aptly romantic and melancholic at the same time. The word ‘bairaag‘ is a word I don’t think I’ve heard in a Bollywood song after ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela)! Beautiful song, but might not stay with me for long.

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4/5 for Samira’s Version

 

5. Badass Babua

Singers ~ Abhishek Nailwal, Neha Bhasin & Sameer Uddin, Music by ~ Sameer Uddin, Lyrics by ~ Akshay Verma

A relatively newer addition to the album (as the composer Sameer Uddin wasn’t credited in the trailer or first poster of the film), this one is a funky “gangsta” song, probably made for Rajkummar’s character in the movie. The U.P. vagabond and rowdy feel is brought out with entertaining lyrics rendered with spunk by Abhishek Nailwal and the composer himself. The gangster feels are brought out by the rap, the techno beats and the overbearing sinister tone. The composition is catchy, but again, not a very lasting tune. The arrangements are more of what the song might be remembered for, if at all. The vocals are fine, and obviously the male singers have done an amazing job, or else, it wouldn’t have sounded so much like a gangster song full of attitude. Neha Bhasin is sidelined unfortunately, and reminds me of Ambili’s portions in ‘Hum Hain Bank Chor’ (Bank Chor). Entertaining, but not everlasting.

Rating: 3/5


Bareilly Ki Barfi is a relatively good multicomposer album. I think these days, the quality of multicomposer albums is definitely increasing, because makers now know the formula for it. You obviously need two upbeat numbers to increase the album’s hit status, and of course, a romantic song, a sad song (preferably by Arijit) and then a couple of versions. Zee seems to have mastered the formula, and they produce another album like ‘Behen Hogi Teri’, which is a mix of styles from different composers, yet comes together as a united album. With a mixed variety of songs, these multiple composers have come up with a nice, khatti-meethi Barfi!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 = 31

Album Percentage: 76.25%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Nazm Nazm (Ayushmann Khurrana) > Twist Kamariya = Sweety Tera Drama = Nazm Nazm = Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar) > Bairaagi = Nazm Nazm (Sumedha Karmahe) > Badass Babua

 

Which is your favourite song from Bareilly Ki Barfi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂