DEBUTANTS HIJACK THE ALBUM FROM NUCLEYA!! (HIGH JACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar
♪ Lyrics by: Akarsh Khurana, Vibha Saraf, SlowCheeta & Rajat Tiwari
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

High Jack Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


High Jack is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film starring Sumeet Vyas, Sonalli Seygall, and Mantra Mugdh, directed by Akarsh Khurana and produced by Phantom Films and Viu. The trailer makes it seem like a movie that requires insanely quirky music, and the music is by multiple composers. Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar are composing for this album, and barring Nucleya, all the other composers are debuting with this album. So, fasten your seatbelts as we take off on this flight that is the album of this film!


Nucleya starts off the album with probably the freshest song I’ve heard in a while, Behka. The song starts with a pleasant guitar strum accompanied by a fresh EDM sound, that runs all throughout the song, and Nucleya does a nice job not making it boring, even though the song runs for four minutes! Vibha Saraf sings one stanza at the beginning, and the same one towards the end; barring that, the song is completely EDM — and good EDM at that! Nucleya is great at this kind of stuff, and it’s nice to see a Bollywood producer actually letting him make it. Anurag Kashyap directed his energies into making a high octane rap song earlier this year in ‘Mukkabaaz’, and now he (because Phantom produced the film) lets him do his signature EDM, which turns out mind blowing.
Nucleya’s other song Aapaatkaleen, is a short theme song with dialogues by the cast members, and another catchy and groovy EDM rhythm, and fun sound effects. It’s nice to see Nucleya get experimental with sound in a Bollywood film.
Anurag Saikia’s Bollywood debut happens with another experimental track, the best of this album, Prabhu Ji. The song appears in two versions. Both versions have the same arrangements, but just sung by two different singers, Asees Kaur and debutant Suvarna Tiwari.
The Asees Kaur Version will definitely be the radio’s favourite, while music lovers would love the Suvarna Tiwari Version, because of the classical singing talent she possesses. At the end of the day, both versions are enjoyable. Anurag Saikia’s composition is a winner, because it is an efficient bhajan-like tune, and the amazing fusion with Electronic music is a wonderful touch, making the song sound extremely fresh. The lyrics by director Akarsh Khurana are great, and intentionally (or unintentionally?) funny, because in such a film you know this isn’t going to be a real bhajan situation, so the lyrics sound all the more quirky!
SlowCheeta and Shwetang Shankar step into Bollywood with Kripya Dhyaan De, another song with some sick electronic programming, especially with the bagpipes. There isn’t much by way of composition here, as it is primarily a rap song, but that too, has been done tastefully. However, it isn’t something that you’ll think of much after listening to it. It’ll play and get over, and you’ll forget about it soon. That’s not saying it isn’t catchy though, and the composers have given it a nice soundscape.
The last composer Rajat Tiwari, also debuting with this album, presents his song Happy Ending Song, also in two versions. Both the First Version and the Second Version go completely acoustic and say so too, in the lyrics by Akarsh Khurana. (“Electronic music kaafi sun liya, isiliye acoustic bajaana hai“). The composition itself is enjoyable, feel-good, much like the rest of the songs in the album, and again the arrangements and vocals are done well. Taaruk Raina is a great find, he sings the song in a charming way in both versions, and while Sumedha Karmahe accompanies him (sounding as usual like she could have sounded better) in the first version, Manasi Mulherkar (sounding like Shefali Alvares). The lyrics are enjoyable and suitable for the end credits scene.


Barring one song, the album is completely high on electronic music, but more than that, it is a launchpad for four talented composers, who kind of hijack the album from Nucleya!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 8.5 + 6 + 7 + 7 = 52

Album Percentage: 74. 3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Prabhu Ji (Both Versions) > Behka > Happy Ending Song (Both Versions) = Aapaatkaaleen > Kripya Dhyaan De

 

Which is your favourite song from High Jack? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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IMPRESSIVE TEAMWORK!! (DAAS DEV – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag & Shamir Tandon
♪ Lyrics by: Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Deepak Ramola, Dr. Sagar, Bulleh Shah, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Munir Niazi, Gaurav Solanki & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th April 2018

Daas Dev Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Daas Dev is a Bollywood political thriller starring Rahul Bhat, Aditi Rao Hydari and Richa Chadha in lead roles. The film is directed by Sudhir Mishra, and produced by Saptarishi Cinevision. The film has tanked as Such it Mishra’s weakest film, but we concern ourselves with the music, and let me tell you, this album is probably the dark horse album of the year! The music is composed by Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag and Shamir Tandon. Read on to find out why I call it the dark horse album of the year so far! 🙂


Sandesh Shandilya and Vipin Patwa are the lead composers for the film: both have two songs each while the other three composers present us with one song each. Let’s start with Vipin Patwa’s portion of the album, since he hasn’t been active for so long!
Sehmi Hai Dhadkan is a melancholic but intense romantic song, that really works opposite to how these songs usually work with me. I actually liked the song. The tune is gripping, the instrumentation deep and likeable, and Atif’s vocals strong. The cello and piano work together against the digital beats, and Vipin’s composition is really captivating, especially with the hook, and the line before it, where Atif performs an impeccable aalaap. Dr. Sagar’s lyrics are good, but run of the mill. Vipin’s other song, Tain To Uttey, is a nice reimagination of Bulleh Shah’s verse, set against an electrifying folksy-rock fusion. Javed Bashir performs in a way that equals his rendition of ‘Piya Tu Kaahe Rootha Re’ (Kahaani), and he sounds amazing in those aalaaps, and in the hookline, when the composer brings in amazing rock elements accompanied by nice classical music elements. The interlude with Javed’s SARGAM is unforgettable.
Sandesh Shandilya though, takes the album to a different plane, with clever folk-techno fusion in both his songs. The relatively weaker (in no means a bad song), Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri, is a sensual romantic song sung by Papon and newcomer Shraddha Mishra. Two of Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s poems get amalgamated into this song, where Papon delivers an amazing performance as always, and even newcomer Mishra supports him and does her part beautifully with her distinct voice. The composition stands out as sensuous and experimental, while the techno sounds give it an even more intense lounge-ish sound. It reminds me of ‘Behroopia’ (Bombay Velvet) with its soundscape. The composition of the antara is mind blowing and tough to not love!
Sandesh’s other song, my personal favourite of the album because of its quirkiness and happy-go-lucky sound, is Challa Chaap Chunariya. The composition is essentially that of a folksy dance song, and it gets really catchy in the hookline and the cross line before it, and even more captivating with Rekha Bhardwaj’s stylish vocals. But the real magic here is the fusion by Shandilya. It’s so surprising this is the same Shandilya who made songs like ‘Suraj Hua Maddham’ (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham) and ‘Aaoge Jab Tum’ (Jab We Met) in the 2000s, but now he has reinvented his style so drastically! The sarangi pairs beautifully with the psychedelic sounds, and the quirky programming makes it even more addictive.
Arko Pravo Mukherjee also breaks out of his spree of composing sugary sweet romantic songs, to create a nice rock ballad. Rangdaari has all the elements of a catchy rock song. Navraj Hans gets a short prelude in Punjabi, that we wish lasted longer, or featured once more in the song, until Arko takes the mic and sings his addictive composition. The arrangements are just like any rock song you’d hear, but nevertheless, very likeable. The hookline has a catchy composition as well; I just wish some more established singer had sung it. The guitars in the interludes are amazing, and so are the romantic lyrics by Arko Pravo Mukherjee.
Debutante composer Anupama Raag presents Azaad Kar, a song composed on that oh-so-heart-warming seven beat rhythm that is so prevalent in Bollywood, mainly for sad songs. The Indian tune is beautiful, as are the arrangements, with one digital plucked instrument playing throughout, coupled with jingle bells and tablas later on. The choice of Swanand Kirkire for singing it is really perfect; kudos to Anupama for remembering him. Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are good too.
The weakest song of the album comes from Shamir Tandon; he composes a very heavy pathos-filled rock song, Marne Ka Shauk, that does not connect at all, with cringeworthy vocals (surprisingly by Papon and not so surprisingly by Krishna Beura) and very cringeworthy lyrics (as expected from Sameer Anjaan by now). It’s probably what the Devdas in this retelling sings when he starts drinking. 😂


All in all, this album turns out to be a surprisingly great album from multiple composers, but each pitch in to do their best, as per the script of the movie.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 8 + 5.5 = 54

Album Percentage: 77.14%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Challa Chaap Chunariya > Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri >
Azaad Kar = Tain To Uttey > Sehmi Hai Dhadkan = Rangdaari > Marne Ka Shauk

Which is your favourite song from Daas Dev? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHANTANU SCORES, OTHERS ARE FORCED!! (OCTOBER – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shantanu Moitra, Anupam Roy & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanveer Ghazi, Swanand Kirkire & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 28th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 13th April 2018

October Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


October is a Bollywood film starring Varun Dhawan, Banita Sandhu and Gitanjali Rao. The film is directed by Shoojit Sircar and produced by Ronnie Lahiri and Sheel Kumar. The film’s music is scored by Shantanu Moitra, Anupam Roy and Abhishek Arora, three composers who have recurring composed for Sircar’s films. Let’s see how well this album turns out!


Lead composer Shantanu Moitra really knows how to shed his Raju Hirani composition style when necessary. For Shoojit Sircar production “Pink” (2016), he created a pensive melody “Kaari Kaari”. This time, he starts the album off with the instrumental that has gained monumental success (especially since it is an instrumental), the October Theme. The track is full of beautiful violins (lead violin by Rohan Roy), a soulful piano (George Joseph, Artem Panteleev), not to forget the deep cello (Ilya Ten). Shantanu’s composition is beautiful, but the treatment he gives it with the instrumentation is what makes it redeeming.
That’s proved in the next song Chal, where the same tune, doesn’t create quite the same impact. Shantanu adds a very awkward 70s pop sound, not going quite well with the standard set by its instrumental version. Monali’s voice sounds very different, and Tanveer Ghazi’s lyrics create no impact whatsoever except a bit of occasional awkwardness. I must say though, the guitars (Ankur) are catchy.
It’s in Manwaa that the composer strikes gold. Sunidhi Chauhan’s voice is a perfect choice for the heart-warming semiclassical composition, and Shantanu’s trademark style of repeating an instrumental loop in the background works wonders as always. Swanand Kirkire pens soulful lyrics, while Shantanu accompanies Sunidhi’s voice with amazing arrangements — mostly digital beats, making it a wonderful fusion track. The composition of the antara is excellent, Sunidhi mastering the high notes as always. The song is hands down the best of the album, and most suited for the film!
Anupam Roy’s Tab Bhi Tu, in the initial couple of listens, sounds like the typical Bollywood Rahat cry fest, but after some time, I warmed up to it. It is definitely a new genre that Anupam Roy tried, and the composition, though maudlin and heavy to the ears, takes some getting accustomed to before you keep humming it all day. Shamik Chakraborty’s arrangements are the highlight here, with the electric guitars (Rishabh Ray) and drums (Sandipan Parial) standing out, and the flute (Sushanta Nandi) neutralising the rock. Tanveer Ghazi’s lyrics, again, create less impact.
Abhishek Arora’s song Theher Ja, is probably the one that suits the film the least, and though the composition is amazing, the composer ruins it with a techno beat, and electric guitars and the like. I would’ve preferred an unplugged version or a version with piano and violins against Armaan’s soothing vocals. Abhiruchi Chand’s lyrics are functional.


Considering that there were no songs in the film, the composers managed to give some good songs, but nothing more, except one I’ll love forever! What the result is, is that Shantanu, also the background score composer for the film, ends up composing within the film’s soundscape, but the others’ songs sound forced in just to create a music album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 6.5 + 9.5 + 7 + 6 = 37

Album Percentage: 74%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Manwaa > October Theme > Tab Bhi Tu > Chal > Theher Ja

 

Which is your favourite song from October? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DIL RAAZI HAI, TO LISTEN ON LOOP!! (RAAZI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy
♪ Lyrics by: Gulzar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 18th April 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 11th May 2018

Raazi Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes

 


Raazi is an upcoming Bollywood period espionage thriller (I swear I made that term up myself; what else can you call it?!) starring Alia Bhatt, Vicky Kaushal, Rajit Kapur, Jaideep Ahlawat, Amruta Khanvilkar and Soni Razdan in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Talvar’ fame Meghna Gulzar, and produced by Karan Johar, Hiroo Yash Johar, Apoorva Mehta and Junglee Pictures. The film is based on the novel ‘Calling Sehmat’ by Harinder Sikka. Now, thrillers in Bollywood have very little scope for music. Meghna Gulzar, in her first movie ‘Talvar’, had roped in Vishal Bhardwaj for the music since he was the writer and producer for the film. Here though, she goes for Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, the trio who invented the Bollywood rom-com sound as we know it these days (by which I mean most of the rom-coms that stay obedient and don’t follow the multicomposer trend), which was a surprise. This is the trio’s first project after ‘Rock On 2’ in November 2016, and whose music released in September 2016, so that was a long wait. And even after the wait, it was a thriller film we were going to get their comeback album for, and not a rom-com as I would have liked. Nevertheless, expectations weren’t low! It’s Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Gulzar after all; what can go wrong?


Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, who we are hearing after more than one and a half years, do not make it that obvious. When you come back with a melody as strong as Ae Watan, you really don’t need to worry about whether audiences will remember you even after so long. Half the battle is won there itself! Now, the song comes in two versions, the male version by Arijit, and the female version by Sunidhi. Arijit’s Version has done a good job in attracting the masses towards the album, but that doesn’t mean Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy compromise on its quality. The song is reminiscent of olden day patriotic numbers, complete with a resplendent backing chorus (Raman Mahadevan, Ravi Mishra, Binaya Mohanty, Arun Kamath & Arshad Mohammed). Arijit is in his element, especially when he starts the song with that wonderfully seamless transition from the low to high octave! Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy help him with immersive arrangements that do not fail to appeal to the patriot within you. The strong melody too, makes its mark felt. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s strings and percussions are wonderful, with heavy hangovers from their “Lakshya” album. Just as he started, Arijit ends the song on a high note, literally!
Sunidhi’s Version, on the other hand, takes the folksy rote, making for a blissful and heavenly listen. Sunidhi, as always, sings brilliantly, but it doesn’t end there. She gets an even better backing chorus than Arijit. This time, sweet children accompany the lead singer (from Shankar Mahadevan Academy’s Children’s Chorus). The name that stands out is Satyajeet Jena, who had participated in the last season of “Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Li’l Champs”, and he gets his own little solo performance towards the end, which he aces! The children’s chorus, and the tinny programming give the song a wonderful retro touch, like the songs from the era depicted in the film (something like ‘Humko Man Ki Shakti’ from ‘Guddi’). Tapas Roy’s rabaab creates a soulful Kashmiri sound, while Dipesh Varma and Shikhar Naad Qureshi do an amazing job with percussions!
Both versions have mainly the same lyrics, and when it’s Gulzar saab’s pen, you know it can’t go wrong! His lyrics evoke a patriotic feeling right away, and coupled with the beautiful melody, it is hard to ignore this song!
Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy continue the Kashmiri folk with Dilbaro, a bidaai song which sounds happy but is lyrically quite heart-wrenching. (Just like Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s ‘Chaandaniya’ from ‘2 States’ which I like to call the happy sad song.) The melody here is so cute, it’s impossible to not start humming along right away. (Part of that is also because it sounds very familiar, but you can’t pinpoint which song or songs it sounds like!) The lead vocalist here is Harshdeep Kaur, who as always, delivers a charming rendition, and sounds like Alka Yagnik in the high-pitched antara too! Shankar Mahadevan’s surprise cameo is wonderfully placed, as are the lyrics by Gulzar for that portion. Vibha Saraf is the one who should be credited though, for piquing your interest in the song, because it is her sweet Kashmiri lines that suck you in right away. On the arrangements front, Tapas Roy returns for wonderful work on the Rabaab, not to mention Arshad Khan’s heart-wrenching esraj; whenever that plays, it’s as if the strings of your heart are being tugged at. The hookline of the song is so powerfully soothing, cute and charming at the same time, it is difficult not to get the song stuck in your mind after just a couple of listens!!
At the end, we have Raazi, a song that equals the ‘Dangal’ title track in many uncanny ways. First of all, it is one of those rare title tracks where the title of the film actually makes sense in the song. Arijit Singh pulls off a ‘Binte Dil’ yet again in the one minute long prelude to the song, where he does the voice inflection impeccably yet again. It is only when the Esraj (again, splendidly performed by Arshad Khan) takes us back to the actual song, when we come back to trademark SEL sound — a repeating Bouzouki riff (oh so trademark SEL!) by Tapas Roy is wonderful. The repeating chants of “Agar Dil Raazi Hai” are equivalent to ‘Dangal’s “Dangal Dangal“. The folksy arrangements are similar to that of ‘Dangal’! I’m just so happy we have these two beautiful title tracks to cherish forever! They are so similar yet so different! Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy bring in even more of their signature marks when the second antara gets very melancholic, something only Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy can manage without making it over the top! And Gulzar saab’s lyrics manage to wow you yet again. The star of the song is definitely Arijit Singh, using different inflections each time he sings the hookline. No wonder he’s the top singer of today…just that some composers know how to use his talent to the best!


Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy return after a hiatus that seemed longer than it was, and it is only when this album came out when I realised what was missing from Bollywood music in 2018 — smart composers who can manage to compose as per the script, but whose songs have a life outside of it as well! Finally, we get a soundtrack this year, which I’ll be raazi to listen to on loop!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 9 + 9.5 + 9.5 + 9.5 = 37.5

Album Percentage: 93.75% {I guess we got our Best album of the year so far!}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Don’t. Even. Ask.

 

Which is your favourite song from Raazi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT THE TYPICAL CRY-FEST!! (PARI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anupam Roy
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd March 2018

Pari Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Pari is a Bollywood horror/fantasy film starring Anushka Sharma, Parambrata Chaterjee, Rajat Kapoor and Ritabhari Chakraborty. The film is directed by debutant Prosit Roy and produced by Anushka Sharma, Karnesh Sharma, Prernaa Arora and Arjun N Kapoor. The film apparently did well at being an unconventional horror film with an actual plot, and hence got mostly positive reviews. The music for the film has been composed by Anupam Roy, back after his surprise album ‘Dear Maya’ last year. The album contains only two songs, but from past experience, I can say that long albums don’t always mean the best albums! So let’s have a look at what Anupam has to offer in this short album!


Anupam Roy’s short, and befittingly, at that, album to this horror film consists of two songs, polar opposites of each other. So Ja So Ja is the one that you can immediately associate with the horror genre; it is one of those horrorific lullabies that Bollywood serves to us once in a while, when they’re not too busy wanting the music of horror films to resemble ‘Aashiqui 2’s music. As a result, the song, unlike most songs from Hindi horror films, haunts, and how! Anupam’s composition is just enough sinister to make you get goosebumps and feel uncomfortable. Of course, the heavy use of piano and strings makes the song sound deeper than it would with just the vocals. Speaking of which, Rekha Bhardwaj delivers another splendid performance, requiring a lot of finesse, thehraav and serenity from her part; but then again, when has she not delivered what the song requires of her? Roy experiments with the beats in the antara, adding a sort of retro touch to the composition, and arrangement. The only part the song actually sounds like an actual lullaby is the high pitched line in the antara — also the highlight of the song, both times it plays in the respective antaras. In the interlude, Anupam places an amazing strings portion that is coupled with amazing drum beats too! All in all, this is a wonderful horror song! Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are amazing too, managing to get the horror aspect of the song across effectively, keeping the lullaby intact.
The second song from the album, Meri Khamoshi Hai, is probably the best song I’ve heard till now this year. It’s such a beautiful number, which steals your heart away instantly. Right from the opening guitar portion, to the wonderfully pleasant tablas throughout the song, Anupam Roy makes sure that music lovers are placated, even though the film doesn’t call for such a love song. Not that I’m complaining, I’m so glad he was asked to make this song! At least it’s better than the usual painful, dreadful, melancholic love song we get in other horror films. A newcomer Ishan Mitra is roped in to sing this song, and his Arijit-ish vocal texture is just perfect for the song. His voice is a bit more polished than Arijit’s and that’s why it is all the more perfect for such a semiclassical melody. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are heart-warming. And the composition is such that I don’t think we’ll get another love song as powerful in melody as this, for a long time. I had this feeling last for ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and it wasn’t surpassed at least for me, by any other song last year. I predict the same with this song! (Which is also the first song to get a 10/10 this year. Yay!)


Anupam Roy’s best album in Bollywood till now, also happens to be his shortest!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 10 = 18

Album Percentage: 90% {So we get our best album of the year till now; it’ll be difficult to surpass!}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Meri Khamoshi Hai > So Ja So Ja

 

Which is your favourite song from Pari? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

4 GEMS!! (3 STOREYS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Clinton Cerejo & Amjad-Nadeem
♪ Lyrics by: Puneet Krishna, Amjad-Nadeem, Alaukik Rahi, Shellee & Pushaan Mukherjee
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

3 Storeys Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


3 Storeys is a Bollywood psychological thriller, starring Pulkit Samrat, Renuka Shahane, Richa Chadha, Masumeh, Sharman Joshi, Ankit Rathi and Aisha. The film, directed by Arjun Mukerjee, is produced by Farhan Akhtar and Ritesh Sidhwani. The film revolves around a chawl, where three stories of three people living in three different storeys, are intertwined. The music for the film has been given by Clinton Cerejo, who usually does music for thrillers like this, and a guest composition by Amjad-Nadeem too, is included in the album. Let’s see what the album for this film consists of!


Lead composer Clinton Cerejo sticks to his usual style of composition, yet manages to create some beautiful tracks. Bas Tu Hai is a poignant and intense romantic melody set on a pulsating alternative rock template (reminiscent of Pritam’s songs), guitars doing just the right trick for the audience to shower their love upon it. The mellow composition is just perfect for such a film that has a mystery vibe to it, and Arijit and Jonita make a great pair together, singing the song with the right amount of intensity, and without making it sound melodramatic. Credit goes to Clinton too, for doing his best to not make it fall into the “typical song” category that such songs usually fall into — the song has repeat value and a life outside the movie. The antara has Arijit going into a full rockstar mode, and it begins amazingly, with a nice rock guitar backing him. Puneet Krishna’s lyrics are nice and soothing as well.
The next song by Clinton happens to fall into his comfort zone. Azaadiyaan is the standard Clinton Cerejo affair, with a soaring melody backed with a minimalistic arrangement. It reminds me of ‘Haq Hai’, another beautiful minimalistic song from Clinton’s album for ‘Te3n’. Bianca and Clinton always complement each other so well, and just like all their previous duets, this one works more because of that chemistry. The harmony between the two has been done well throughout the song. Not a song that will instantly connect, but when it does, you’ll want to keep humming it.
Clinton’s last song is the most fun out of the three songs he has composed. Zaroori Bewakoofi has Mohit Chauhan at his mischievous best, and the backing vocalists supporting him with a camaraderie that is so fun to listen to. The “Kahaani Atrangi Si” loop by the backing vocalists (Vivienne Pocha, Crystal Sequeira & Bianca Gomes) is entertaining, and a special mention goes to Clinton for his vocal trumpet and other entertaining sound effects placed strategically throughout the song, like the quirky sounds in the interlude. Guitars, piano, all the instruments that have been used, reflect a carefree attitude, and the digital beats used are a clever throwback to Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s method of creating carefree songs. The composition is a bit weak, but the backing vocalists and the sound effects help to overcome that! Again, the lyrics here, by Pushaan Mukherjee, are fun too!
Guest composers Amjad-Nadeem return after over half a year to compose a charming garba song, Raasleela. Like all well-made garba numbers, this has strong percussions, a nice flute assortment loop, and the wonderful techno sounds support that even more. The sweet and simple nature of the song is its strong point. Sumedha, sounding uncannily like Shraddha Kapoor in places where the composition is too high, renders the song well, but it could’ve been much better, going by her performances on reality shows, and her previous songs in Bollywood! Amjad-Nadeem do a great job in making the composition catchy though, so everything else is kind of covered up.


Four sweet and simple tracks that work only because of their simplicity!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8.5 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 8 = 31.5

Album Percentage: 78.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bas Tu Hai > Raasleela > Azaadiyaan = Zaroori Bewakoofi

 

Which is your favourite song from 3 Storeys? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

KRIPAYA DHYAAN DE, YEH ALBUM SUNN LE! (LOVE PER SQUARE FOOT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen
♪ Lyrics by: Gopal Datt, Anand Tiwari, Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab, Sumeet Suvarna, Abhiruchi Chand & Jamil Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 14th February 2018

Love Per Square Foot Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Love Per Square Foot is a Bollywood rom-com that premiered on Netflix this Valentine’s Day. The film stars Vicky Kaushal, Angira Dhar and Alankrita Sahai in lead roles, and is directed by Anand Tiwari, and produced by Ronnie Screwvala. The film’s music has been composed by Sohail Sen, back after a long time; his last was ‘Happy Bhag Jayegi’ in 2016. Let’s hope his musical style is intact and he delivers yet another enjoyable album!


Sohail Sen’s return to music composition after one and a half years doesn’t hold as much magic as his previous outings used to. That being said, this album takes some time to warm up to, and in the first listen, doesn’t create much of an impact.
Proceedings are kicked off by the entertaining Mumbaiya rap song Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De, a tribute to all things Mumbai. The residents of the metropolis would feel a certain pride once they listen to this song, as will the train station announcers. The rap by Mumbai’s Finest (Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab & Sumeet Suvarna) is entertaining, a bit in the style of DIVINE, and thankfully fits snugly into the song. Lively beatboxing starts off the song, but the song kind of loses its connect in the initial one minute or so, until it settles into its place. After that, it is really enjoyable. I love the way Sohail introduces a nice Maharashtrian-flavoured bhajan segment towards the end, and a nice Ganpati dhol taasha rhythm in the interlude. The vocalists seem to be newcomers, but do a great job in conveying the youthfulness of the city.
Udit Narayan, the evergreen singer, the only singer who hasn’t seemed to age, returns after quite some time, with Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti, an upbeat wedding song led by the quintessential brass band. Sohail also composes it in a typical 90s tune, to help Udit get more comfortable, probably. It still works thanks to the catchy rhythms and composition and of course, the vocals! Nothing particularly new here, though. The lyrics are funny though, comparing love and marriage.
Benny Dayal and Shivangi Bhayana get the weakest song of the album, Chicken Dance, a song whose composition falls all over the place, though the initial adlib is entertaining. The electric guitars do not work at all, and it ends up being a clumsy party number with no recall value. Benny thankfully has the magnetism in his voice to help listeners keep listening, but Shivangi doesn’t have that quality yet!
Aashiyana is a beautiful romantic song, the only song of the album whose lyrics (by Abhiruchi Chand) make a huge impact on the song. Altamash Faridi and Tarannum Malik, regulars on Sohail Sen albums, know how to do justice to his music, and so the results in the vocal department are amazing. I commend the composer for not going for Arijit though there was a huge scope, because Altamash’s voice brings a freshness to the song, though slightly over-nasal. Tarannum sings her part beautifully too! The antaras are the best parts of the song, composed in a tune that is easily hummable. The reason the lyrics stand out so much, is the conversational way they have been written, seeming like a tribute to Gulzar, who is also mentioned in the song!
Maqbool Hai, the other song by Altamash, is a nice mellow number, starting off with an operatic piece, and seguing into a very Bhatt-ish but very hauntingly catchy melody that wins your heart over. Again, Altamash sings his heart out, creating beautiful effects. The Rahman touch is audible in the song as well, and somehow it sounds like a song that resembles songs from 2008-2009. It still sounds fresh though.
Rekha Bhardwaj ends the album with two versions of a classically-based melody Raaz Apne Dil Ke, a song that fares better and seems more lovable in its Indian Version, with arrangements that complement the composition — tablas, played in a soothing rhythm, and a wonderful tanpura setting the mood for a wonderful classical listen. The Western Version sounds like the composition is uncomfortable with the clumsy “doo doo doo da” with which the song starts, not to mention the digital beats in the background. Not the very best examples of fusion, but there is still a hint of classical music (sarangi) here too, which makes it bearable, at least.


Sohail Sen has done better than this previously, but overall, the album is enjoyable, with a mixed variety of songs, and none being utterly bad!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 7 + 5.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 6.5 =

Album Percentage: 72.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aashiyana > Maqbool Hai = Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Indian) > Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De > Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti > Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Western) > Chicken Dance

 

Which is your favourite song from Love Per Square Foot? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂